Definition of ticket in English:

ticket

noun

  • 1A piece of paper or card that gives the holder a certain right, especially to enter a place, travel by public transport, or participate in an event.

    ‘admission is by ticket only’
    • ‘Organizers warned yesterday that holders of fraudulent tickets would not be admitted to World Cup events.’
    • ‘The busway tickets are sold in two ways: vouchers for a certain amount of money in the form of a ‘smart card’ and regular tickets for each trip.’
    • ‘These days the travelers validate their purple tickets or season ticket coupons at automatic turnstiles.’
    • ‘Festival passes are available for $75 and are exchangeable for tickets to six performance events.’
    • ‘The man came by to check their tickets and their travel permits, but appeared not to be suspicious.’
    • ‘Most travel agents charge a fee to deliver paper tickets.’
    • ‘They each handed their tickets to the ticket taker and entered the plane.’
    • ‘Although technically open to the public, entry was limited to holders of scarce tickets of admission.’
    • ‘The airline has announced it would charge travel agents a $55 fee if they requested paper tickets for domestic flights from July 1.’
    • ‘Travelers who buy tickets with credit cards can typically get refunds from the credit card company if an airline fails.’
    • ‘Raffle tickets for the event are now on sale and admission on the night will be £5.’
    • ‘All season ticket holders managed to get tickets, but many faced lengthy waits.’
    • ‘In addition to the movie tickets, he preserves even the entry tickets to all entertainment events like circus and magic shows.’
    • ‘They let season ticket holders sell tickets they otherwise wouldn't use.’
    • ‘Apparently, they were issuing two and three tickets to each season ticket holder and that's why they ran out.’
    • ‘An all-in ticket costs €60, but you can get tickets for individual events as well.’
    • ‘They sign a contract to present one performance of their work in April, and to help sell tickets and publicize the event.’
    • ‘Early booking of tickets for the event is advisable as tickets are limited.’
    • ‘However, it is necessary to use a paper ticket for international travel.’
    • ‘The objective is to stop people passing used public transport tickets to each other.’
    pass, warrant, authorization, licence, permit
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A receipt for goods that have been received.
      • ‘Some have a Post Office or bank-like flavour to them, with clerks waiting behind grilles to receive customers' bets and issue tickets as receipts.’
    2. 1.2A piece of paper or card bought as a way of entering a lottery or raffle.
      ‘the two winning tickets, bought within days of each other, went unclaimed’
      • ‘A couple of weeks ago I bought ten pounds worth of lottery tickets.’
      • ‘Anyone who matches the unique Millionaire Raffle number at the bottom of the ticket wins £1 million.’
      • ‘Tickets for the raffle are on sale locally.’
      • ‘In the morning, I stumbled out to the newsagent to buy a lottery ticket to send my sister for her birthday.’
      • ‘Last week, a woman bought and then lost what she says is the winning ticket in the Mega Millions lottery which, at the time, was at $150 million or so.’
      • ‘At the grocer's last night I briefly considered buying a lottery ticket - it was clearly a lucky day.’
      • ‘I had three beers, and bought a couple tickets for a charity raffle.’
      • ‘I had someone on the phone today trying to sell me an $80 raffle ticket to win a new Ferrari.’
      • ‘The raffle tickets were $20 each.’
      • ‘On a whim, he bought two more lottery tickets in early July of this year.’
      • ‘The committee wish to thank all those who in any way contributed to the proceeds and those who bought tickets for the raffle.’
      • ‘The chance of winning the lottery with a single ticket have not changed, however; it's still 1 in 14 million.’
      • ‘The unsuspecting holder of a winning Lotto ticket which was bought in west London has just a few days to claim a £3.9m prize.’
      • ‘A few minutes ago, I stood in a supermarket queue a couple of places behind a woman who bought fifty pounds' worth of lottery tickets on her credit card.’
      • ‘I've never bought a lottery ticket or a scratch card.’
      • ‘The winning ticket was in his wallet, which was stolen the night before.’
      • ‘The odds are so unfavourable that unless you really liked to take on risks at unfavourable odds why would you ever buy a lottery ticket?’
      • ‘Make a chart and list all your fixed and variable expenses, down to your weekly lottery ticket purchases.’
      • ‘Tickets for the raffle cost £1 per each.’
      • ‘I've bought a lottery ticket, so fingers crossed.’
    3. 1.3(in information technology) a request logged on a work tracking system detailing an issue that needs to be addressed or task that must be performed.
      ‘if you have opened a ticket and it's not yet been resolved, then there is no need for you to open a new one’
      ‘they closed the ticket without doing anything’
      • ‘I've had a trouble ticket open on this exact issue for the past two weeks.’
      • ‘He determined that the modem and software must be working fine and ok'd the ticket to be closed as a probable issue with the caller's home phone lines.’
      • ‘Currently we have 16 customer tickets open with speed-related issues.’
      • ‘The system keeps your ticket open and will show a status of "waiting for customer's response".’
      • ‘They acknowledged that I was not getting what I was paying for, and opened a ticket to look into what was going on.’
      • ‘Open a ticket in the bug tracker under the category "content defect" and we'll put it in the queue.’
      • ‘The repair person receives the ticket and resolves the issue and closes the incident when the problem is resolved.’
      • ‘I can't help you until you've opened a problem ticket.’
      • ‘The ability to work with tickets directly from the admin area would greatly ease its use for managers.’
      • ‘If you have created a ticket in the member centre and feel that you are happy that we are working on the issue or that the issue has been resolved please close the ticket.’
      • ‘Have you opened a ticket with the Help Desk yet?’
      • ‘The options in this section allow for opening a support ticket, viewing all open tickets, viewing closed tickets (and re-opening them if necessary), searching open and closed support requests, and editing the user profile.’
    4. 1.4A method of getting into or out of (a specified state or situation)
      ‘drugs are seen as the only ticket out of poverty’
      ‘companies that appeared to have a one-way ticket to profitability’
      • ‘Home ownership is not a one-way ticket to quality street, and it is not for those with low or uncertain incomes.’
      • ‘The beauty pageant is a ticket out of town for the hopeful girls who participate.’
      • ‘Sean's ticket out of the hood was the State Cops.’
      • ‘This shows that people are hoping that their degree is a ticket to a career of some higher sort.’
      • ‘His charisma bought him a one way ticket to the calypso semi-final and final dozens of times.’
      • ‘Making a profit on the house is his ticket to a better life for his family.’
      • ‘In 1961 being a folk singer was not a ticket to writing celebrity gardening columns.’
      • ‘Jay's ticket to the big time is his band Archangel, and therein lies his problem.’
      • ‘In recent weeks Irish theatre on tour has looked like a one-way ticket to financial oblivion.’
      • ‘It was my ticket to untold riches, until I discovered that like all the best ideas someone had already thought of it.’
      • ‘Yet how could this be anything but a one-way ticket to even worse times?’
      • ‘Combining moves from more unusual dance methods can be the ticket to standing out in a performance or audition.’
  • 2A certificate or warrant, in particular.

    1. 2.1An official notice of a traffic offence.
      ‘the officer issued Rhodes a speeding ticket’
      • ‘The fact of the matter is that the police see a range of policing as important to reduce crime, including the issuing of tickets for traffic offences.’
      • ‘I like to think that women get away without traffic tickets more often than men.’
      • ‘Ideally, punishment for marijuana-related offences would be similar to a traffic ticket, or an open alcohol offence.’
      • ‘It also leads me to realize that many motorists here have no regard for the law, and are in full realization that failure to pay a traffic ticket fine will not bring you a penalty, at least not too soon anyway.’
      • ‘If you owe child support or have outstanding traffic tickets, the guards, theoretically, will know.’
      • ‘Now even a local police officer writing a traffic ticket can determine that a violator is subject to a deportation order and presumably make an arrest.’
      • ‘A total of 24 people received tickets for traffic offences.’
      • ‘Everyone looks to take advantage of every loophole available when paying taxes, paying a traffic ticket, appearing for jury duty or whatever.’
      • ‘Our current fines, applied after many warnings, are so small they amount to a traffic ticket.’
      • ‘As well as nowhere to park I discovered three traffic wardens eagerly sticking tickets on any and every car that had attempted to park where they could.’
      • ‘Nearby, a business called Latin American Services promises help with plane fares, income tax forms, and traffic tickets.’
      • ‘Endorsable tickets for offences such as speeding and passing red lights, lead to three points on your licence and a £60 fine.’
      • ‘Over-zealous traffic wardens have slapped tickets on two Radcliffe traders outside their own shops, even though they were unloading stock.’
      • ‘Still, the news came at a bad time: Esteban was trying to pay off traffic tickets and send money back to his family in Veracruz.’
      • ‘The highest fine that was listed on the ticket was for eight dollars.’
      • ‘And if you owe money for traffic tickets, we could track you down.’
      • ‘The next thing I knew, a traffic ticket was on the windshield of that car, and the blond-haired woman who owned the car came out a few hours later to see it.’
      • ‘You know, a traffic ticket was what she really was responsible for, and she ended up going to prison for committing a felony.’
      • ‘The provincial government is increasing fines and penalties for provincial offences, including speeding tickets, as of August 1st.’
      • ‘They wrote out 35 tickets for other offences across the weekend.’
      • ‘You give them a warning, it's like a traffic ticket.’
    2. 2.2A certificate of qualification as a ship's master, pilot, or other crew member.
      • ‘It held that the exculpatory clause in Russell’s pilot ticket, which is standard in the maritime industry, effectively barred claims against him for simple negligence.’
      • ‘He went to work for the Northern Steamship Company and obtained his master's ticket in 1946.’
    3. 2.3British A certificate of discharge from the army.
  • 3A label attached to a retail product, giving its price, size, and other details.

    • ‘They have price tickets and bar codes attached.’
    • ‘Shipped in a large container from somewhere in the Far East or Eastern Europe, the label and the price ticket will probably have been added in a sweatshop in the north of England.’
    label, tag, sticker, slip, tally, tab, marker, docket
    View synonyms
  • 4North American [in singular] A list of candidates put forward by a party in an election.

    ‘his presence on the Republican ticket’
    • ‘All three believe it is imperative that a candidate from this region is on the party ticket come the next General Election.’
    • ‘No candidates running in Iowa in the past 30 years joined together on the Democratic ticket in the election.’
    • ‘I was hoping there'd be an antiwar candidate on the ticket and was disappointed when Kerry picked Edwards.’
    • ‘If four candidates on a single ticket were all to get into Legco they would require the support of nearly the entire constituency.’
    • ‘Now there's another story, which is Lieberman, the first Jewish candidate, Orthodox Jewish candidate on a national ticket.’
    • ‘On December 1, both parties announced they will be fielding a joint ticket of candidates under the name of the Kurdish Unity List.’
    • ‘On Sunday in the Sligo Park Hotel, they will select three candidates on the party ticket.’
    • ‘The Dems already have someone, but any party who has any candidate on the ticket is eligible if they don't already have a rep.’
    • ‘Not wanting to run on the same ticket as the LaRouche candidates, Stevenson was listed on the ballot as an independent that year.’
    • ‘Mr Lane said that by the whole district voting the temptation was there not to put two strong female candidates on the ticket.’
    • ‘She will never win a place on a national Republican ticket as a candidate for president or vice president.’
    • ‘The vice presidential candidate on the Democratic ticket is the attack dog.’
    • ‘But I do want to encourage people to shake up university politics by not voting in a full ticket of candidates, which has happened in the last several elections.’
    • ‘But what about boosting the ticket before the elections?’
    • ‘Rather than seeking that co-option in September last, Phyllis was selected as a second candidate on the ticket in an effort to take a second seat.’
    • ‘For this reason, parties seek to ensure that their own voters follow the party ticket and transfer their votes to another candidate of the same party.’
    • ‘It helped Cr Gates defeat Cr Irwin on preferences and ensured the other members of his ticket, Crs John Hampton and Brian Suffolk, were elected.’
    • ‘But I don't get to vote for a fantasy ticket; I have to choose between the candidates selected for me.’
    • ‘Even Republican Jews are praising Gore's choice of Lieberman, an Orthodox Jew and the first Jew to run on the national ticket of a major party.’
    • ‘Flannery would be a good candidate on any party ticket and will put in a strong campaign over the coming weeks.’
    1. 4.1A set of principles or policies supported by a party in an election.
      ‘he stood for office on a strong right-wing, no-nonsense ticket’
      • ‘The Iraqi Shias have produced a unity ticket for the elections under the direction of Grand Ayatollah Ali Sistani, the leading Iraqi Shia cleric.’
      • ‘These numbers suggest that a coalition of Islamic parties supporting a single ticket could have won the presidency.’
      • ‘Yet the war shapes other campaigns too, and if Dean falters then there is another candidate on the anti-war ticket: General Wesley Clark.’
      • ‘Progress fought the election on an anti-immigrant ticket.’
      • ‘The party won a resounding victory at the parliamentary elections on a ticket of law and order, and tax cuts.’
      • ‘Alan Jones is an old mate of Turnbull's and naturally supports the ticket and the new constitution.’
      • ‘I would like to vote, this year or sometime, for a ticket and a party that is pro-life, pro-family, and pro-poor.’
      • ‘The concept of going forward with a unity ticket that was bipartisan was always something that we had on the table.’
      • ‘If he's wrong, the only way he'll win their support is through a very-big ticket policy that Green groups believe is worth it.’
      • ‘The ‘unity’ of the presidential ticket rarely survived the election.’
      • ‘Just ahead, the Democratic ticket is official, and the game is underway.’
      • ‘It raises the prospect of the Lib Dems going into the election on a ticket backing extra powers for the Parliament, putting at odds with Labour.’
      • ‘So I think that most of these people are just being given this as a reward for basically soldiering on and supporting the ticket.’
      • ‘I believe that we have been effective champions of our ticket's policies and principles, and that we have achieved much both locally and across the city.’
      • ‘Mr Kerry, a decorated Vietnam veteran, calculated that he didn't need to add foreign policy heft to the ticket.’
      • ‘Are there candidates on the anti-globalisation ticket, then, Tony?’
      • ‘The team is expected to lobby several political parties in a bid to win their support for the ticket in the runoff, he said.’
      • ‘Earl F. Dodge has run for President on the Prohibition ticket in every election since 1984.’
      • ‘People are getting no satisfaction and they are strongly considering having somebody stand in the May elections on a ticket of keeping the school open.’
      • ‘In Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, who swept to power on an election ticket of uncompromising Islamism, the cabal of conservative mullahs have a president to their liking.’
  • 5informal The desirable or correct thing.

    ‘a wet spring would be just the ticket for the garden’
    • ‘Yeah, that's the ticket, deliver two months ahead of schedule.’
    • ‘Both Hyundai vehicles will be just the ticket for transporting the couple's two children, Austin and Phoebe.’
    • ‘Ginkgo may be just the ticket, but not all mountaineers are rushing to the supermarket.’
    • ‘Let's get married in a cow field, that's the ticket.’
    • ‘Sometimes, procrastination is just the ticket.’
    • ‘You and Owen stand in front of me Margaret, so you'll both see better, that's the ticket.’
    • ‘Once I read his article, I slapped myself in the head and thought ‘Oh my God, that's the ticket!’’
    • ‘Hey, that's the ticket: a prime-time presidential address.’
    • ‘Spin it, talk it up, smear and talk down critics - that's the ticket.’
    • ‘Preserve things just as they are, that's the ticket.’
    • ‘Show me handing over that cheque for a billion new health dollars to some disabled kid, that's the ticket.’
    • ‘A tram stop planned for the £300M Kingsway Business Park would have been just the ticket for the 7,000 plus workers expected to find jobs there.’
    • ‘Given the choices, I'd say the pickup truck is just the ticket.’
    • ‘The rectangular lake looked a bit murky, and the spray from the fountain was quite fierce, but cooling off with a paddle in the cascade seemed just the ticket.’
    • ‘Except for all the driving, Idaho was just the ticket for a nice vacation.’
    • ‘A heart-to-heart may be just the ticket for forging a better bond with a busy or stressed-out mom.’
    • ‘For any male Jewish-born atheist, misogynist, egoist out there, this book is just the ticket.’
    • ‘With prices from just £46 a person per night in luxury, family-run B&Bs, a break with Carolina Vacations could be just the ticket.’
    • ‘So a good romp at the close of 2003 was just the ticket.’
    • ‘Warm woolly sheepskinned lined slippers sounded just the ticket.’
  • 6US Scottish informal [with adjective] A person of a specified kind.

    ‘I think you're all a bunch of sick tickets’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Issue (someone) with an official notice of a traffic offence.

    ‘park illegally and you are likely to be ticketed’
    • ‘I hope the next cop who tickets me looks just like that, fishnet stockings and all!’
    • ‘A police officer noticed the passenger had no legs and ticketed the man to the tune of about $350.’
    • ‘Wardens are told to ticket a distraught woman whose car has broken down.’
    • ‘He said that the police did not ticket the presidential guard but only reported the incident to his superior.’
    • ‘Should we be surprised, in the light of recent revelations and allegations, that there is growing scepticism towards explanations by the police as to why they are out there ticketing motorists?’
    • ‘During similar cycling safety campaigns by the police force, cyclists have complained that police focus more on ticketing cyclists than drivers.’
    • ‘It's been brewing for more than a year, this public resentment of the rapacity of police ticketing for traffic offences.’
    • ‘And hovering over them all is the constant threat of the police, who ticket the men tirelessly, leading to hundreds of dollars in fines and repeated stays in jail.’
    • ‘On the incident report for Lodge's citation, it was noted the police did not use force while ticketing him and that he did not receive medical treatment.’
    • ‘He replies, ‘I am wondering if I should ticket you, or let you off with a warning.’’
    • ‘Some baiters were reassigned to a ‘Dumpster Task Force’ to ticket people for leaving garbage out.’
    • ‘On a typical day he might start the morning with a walk around Pickering, ticketing tourists, before zipping across to scour Helmsley.’
    • ‘Another important rule is that they can't ticket you while you're in the drivers seat of your car, or at your vehicle.’
    • ‘The driver was duly ticketed, then the traffic warden flew home, presumably satisfied with his busman's holiday.’
    • ‘If you treat the officer respectfully and roll over, there is no need for him to ticket you to win an argument.’
    • ‘Traffic wardens were powerless to ticket him because the law says penalties cannot be given out if the lines are obscured.’
    • ‘In Westmount, they ticket you for idling in a car for four minutes.’
    • ‘If the cops camped out at the corner of Spadina and College, they could cover the costs of their salaries by ticketing bike-lane parkers.’
    • ‘A police officer witnessed this blatant disregard for the law and attempted to ticket the student for jaywalking.’
    • ‘And don't tell me about the $200 speeding ticket you got doing 165 on the freeway.’
  • 2(of a passenger) be issued with a travel ticket.

    ‘passengers can now get electronically ticketed’
    ‘ticketed passengers’
    • ‘Most airlines showed sensitivity in waiving change fees for ticketed passengers on London-bound flights immediately following the terrorist attacks.’
    • ‘During the four-day Easter holiday, the airline had to pay out $500,000 to fly 145,000 ticketed passengers in hired planes or rival airlines.’
    • ‘There are two different ways to travel: either through ticketed travel or ticketless travel.’
    • ‘Those who made it on the ill-fated planes were ticketed passengers but some apparently used aliases, officials said.’
    • ‘Over the same period, the 13 other airlines tracked by the Transportation Department displaced 412, 447 ticketed passengers voluntarily or against their will.’
    • ‘After another long wait during which the check-in agent kept refreshing his screen every two minutes they did ticket me and I did get the earlier flight.’
    • ‘It cost the airline $500,000 to fly 145,000 ticketed passengers on rival airlines or in hired planes.’
    • ‘His last name matches that of a passenger who was ticketed to board flight 68 but did not show up, the officials said.’
    • ‘All Mileage Plus award reservations on Mexicana must be booked and ticketed by Dec. 31, and travel must be completed by March 31.’
    1. 2.1North American Be destined for a specified state or position.
      ‘they were sure that Downing was ticketed for greatness’
      • ‘Also ticketed for EU sanctions are fresh apples, pears, and rice from the US.’
      • ‘A number of the older buildings downtown have been ticketed for renovation and artists have begun to drift in, lured by low rents.’
      • ‘Deen Grant, who missed his rookie season because of a hip injury, appears to be ticketed for the free safety job.’
      • ‘The animal was then ticketed for rendering and subsequently very quickly disappeared.’
      • ‘Overall, he was 2-2 - 1 in 1999-2000 and ticketed for a backup role this season before Shields' injury.’
      • ‘Some Indians officials fear Ramirez is ticketed for one of the New York teams.’
      • ‘Connie Nielsen is miscast as the femme fatale (originally, the role was ticketed for Monica Bellucci).’
      • ‘Additionally, Fong noted, the USDA vet failed to eartag the animal, a required procedure, after it was ticketed for further testing.’
      • ‘Before he injured his knee in camp, Navies was ticketed for the starting job on the strong side.’
      • ‘They could use a quarterback because Trent Dilfer is ticketed as their starter.’
  • 3(of a retail product) be marked with a label giving its price, size, and other details.

    ‘the sports jacket had been ticketed at two hundred dollars’
    ‘the ticketed price’
    • ‘When I found my VCD player, I was offered a 9 percent discount after my first show of negativity regarding the ticketed price.’
    • ‘If the scanned price of a ticketed item is higher than the shelf price or any other displayed price, the customer is entitled to receive the lower price.’
    • ‘We are committed to partnering with those vendors willing to ship ticketed merchandise.’
    • ‘Radio Frequency (RF) labels provide well ticketed products that stimulate impulse buying and can increase sales dramatically.’

Phrases

  • be tickets

    • informal Be the end.

      ‘if that man talks to the police, it's tickets for him’
  • have tickets on oneself

    • informal Be excessively proud of oneself.

      ‘she dressed me up fit to kill and I must confess I had a few tickets on myself as I walked’
      • ‘Mariah, you might have noticed, has tickets on herself.’
      • ‘Here's a star centre who, unlike many in the Auckland and Canterbury teams, doesn't have tickets on himself.’
      • ‘His girlfriend has married his brother, the affable local copper (Andrew S Gilbert), and everyone is suspicious about why the bloke who always had tickets on himself is back.’
      • ‘Some people have tickets on themselves; other people just sniff and say ‘if you need to ask, you couldn't afford me.’’
      • ‘Oooh, he certainly has tickets on himself, doesn't he?’
  • punch one's ticket

    • 1informal Deliberately undertake particular assignments that are likely to lead to promotion at work.

      ‘Giles had punched his ticket at all the right stops within the journal’
      • ‘War Chant punched his ticket to the Kentucky Derby when he won the San Rafael Stakes and was second in the Santa Anita Derby.’
      • ‘He had punched his ticket as a climbing Sherpa, but the next challenge was to make his mark on Everest.’
      • ‘Last Sunday, the Terrapins punched their ticket to an eleventh straight NCAA tournament with an uninspiring, painful to watch victory over a mediocre University of Virginia team.’
      • ‘That's not to say some big names weren't still looking to punch their ticket to 2004-05.’
      • ‘Reba's Gold punched his ticket to Japan with a win in the Steinlen Handicap on November 10.’
      • ‘The Cardinals have a manager who has punched his ticket to the Hall of Fame; the Astros have one who finally has proved what he can do when he has enough good players.’
      • ‘The Bucs still have tough games against New England and Atlanta before they can punch their ticket to the play-offs.’
      • ‘He punched his ticket to the classics with a 3 3/4-length win in the Arkansas Derby but was eased three weeks later in the Kentucky Derby.’
      • ‘After a mediocre regular season saw them finish at 12-8, the Golden Bears ripped off an impressive post-season run to punch their ticket for the big dance with the Canada West championship.’
      • ‘Johannesburg kept his record perfect and punched his ticket for the Breeders' Cup Juvenile later this month.’
      1. 1.1(in sport) ensure one's progress to a further contest or tournament.
        ‘in scoring 13 points, they punched their ticket to the Super Bowl in Jacksonville’
        • ‘Last year the Saints had to sneak into the B.C.s via the back-door but would rather punch their ticket more easily this time out.’
        • ‘Folklore did not waffle in her response, delivering a 14-length knockout of six other rivals to punch her ticket to the Breeders Cup Juvenile Fillies on Saturday.’
        • ‘Well, the Democrats finally punched their ticket and surprise, surprise, it's the Johns: Kerry and Edwards.’
        • ‘I find it to be a filthy and disgusting act, and ultimately a way for people to punch their ticket for an eternity in hell.’
        • ‘Last Sunday, the Terrapins punched their ticket to an eleventh straight NCAA tournament with an uninspiring, painful to watch victory over a mediocre University of Virginia team.’
        • ‘That's not to say some big names weren't still looking to punch their ticket to 2004-05.’
        • ‘The Bucs still have tough games against New England and Atlanta before they can punch their ticket to the playoffs.’
        • ‘If the season hasn't already punched his ticket to Cooperstown, N.Y., then a third MVP Award certainly would guarantee his place in the Hall of Fame.’
        • ‘At 39, he probably has punched his ticket to Cooperstown with a résumé that includes 2,639 hits, 564 doubles and 1,603 runs.’
        • ‘These are the kinds of things that would punch my ticket to either the Puget Sound or Silicon Valley.’
  • write one's (own) ticket

    • informal Dictate one's own terms.

      ‘a woman with a PhD in engineering could write her own ticket at any Canadian school’
      • ‘Following his successful career as a stand-up comedian and a stint on Saturday Night Live, Murphy practically wrote his own ticket for success.’
      • ‘I'm hoping to have a good year and write my own ticket, pave my own way next year.’
      • ‘It will not take artists long to determine that they can write their own ticket in this world and eventually restructure their contracts with their record companies to give them more money per download.’
      • ‘They have such awesome purchasing power that they write their own ticket.’
      • ‘He'd been in Recruitment for a while now, everyone in-house knew it was the fast-track, if you did well you could write your own ticket to a good position anywhere.’
      • ‘After a decade of being able to practically write their own ticket, American workers have found they are no longer in the driver's seat.’
      • ‘It seems the porky guard's brother-in-law can pull strings on the parole board, and good boxers can write their ticket to an early parole.’
      • ‘She continues, ‘A minority with the above credentials can write their own ticket.’’
      • ‘I believe that you write your own ticket, and that you prepare yourself for the kind of life you want to lead (whether or not you ultimately live up to that, is also your choice).’
      • ‘They are the rare exceptions who were able to write their own ticket!’

Origin

Early 16th century (in the general senses ‘short written note’ and ‘a licence or permit’): shortening of obsolete French étiquet, from Old French estiquet(te), from estiquier to fix, from Middle Dutch steken. Compare with etiquette.

Pronunciation:

ticket

/ˈtɪkɪt/