Main definitions of thrum in English

: thrum1thrum2

thrum1

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1Make a continuous rhythmic humming sound.

    ‘the boat's huge engines thrummed in his ears’
    • ‘Josephine sat up in bed, arms wrapped around her knees, and listened to the rain thrumming on the roof.’
    • ‘The bed was ablaze with the yellow flowers, and here, large humming squadrons of shiny black carpenter bees would thrum from pre-dawn onwards.’
    • ‘Her voice thrummed against his body with a soothing vibration.’
    • ‘Now her heart began thrumming lightly in her ribcage.’
    • ‘There is the occasional bit of ambient engine thrumming, or an occasional starship flyby that uses directional effects, but these uses are infrequent and nothing to write home about.’
    • ‘I could feel the land thrumming with a barely contained vibrancy.’
    • ‘As a child, did you ever slip beneath the bathwater's surface, listen to the blood thrumming in your ears, and find comfort in being completely submerged?’
    • ‘ALL week, front pages and news broadcasts have thrummed and crackled with reports that Bristol is one of Britain's most notorious black spots for drug abuse, prostitution, gun crime and gang warfare.’
    • ‘Rockets scream around you, birds move overhead, engines thrum quietly in your wake.’
    • ‘The engines thrummed slowly to a stop, reverberating power through the air.’
    • ‘She's aware of the engine thrumming beneath her, and through her.’
    • ‘Rain starts thrumming into the canal and onto the skylight outside my room.’
    • ‘The only sounds were bugs thrumming in the grasses above and birds chirping even higher up.’
    • ‘The chopper engine kept on thrumming, and the sea came closer and closer.’
    • ‘He cocked his head as he felt the deck under his feet thrumming with power.’
    • ‘The volcano still thrummed, howling like a strong wind.’
    • ‘Its bones were surely made of brittle glass, they seemed so fragile, and its heart thrummed like a miniature electric motor as it beat over a thousand times a minute.’
    • ‘Those words were thrumming through my head every minute I was in that establishment.’
    • ‘Outside the dramatically beautiful Saitama stadium the coaches were waiting to leave, their engines thrumming in the darkness.’
    • ‘His heartbeat thrummed in his ears, his face hot with blood.’
    purr, whir, throb, vibrate, murmur, buzz, thrum, drone
    murmur, murmuring, drone, droning, vibration, purr, purring, buzz, buzzing, whir, whirring, throb, throbbing, thrum, thrumming
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1with object Strum (the strings of a musical instrument) in a rhythmic way.
      ‘he thrums the strings’
      no object ‘blind men thrum and hum in the soft air’
      • ‘The blind man had finished his song; he began thrumming the strings again and singing amusing ballads.’
      • ‘A case in point is ‘Smelling Limes In Winter’ which begins with thrumming, dulcimer-like pluckings through which a central drone rises.’
      • ‘He starts thrumming the guitar and his age vanishes.’
      • ‘Stretched full upon the floor would lay the minstrel, lute in hands, thrumming gently as his voice rang out through the marble room.’
      • ‘They all sat down and began to thrum the strings of their instruments in a muffled, dreamy manner.’
      strum, pick, twang, plunk, finger
      View synonyms

noun

  • usually in singular A continuous rhythmic humming sound.

    ‘the steady thrum of rain on the windows’
    • ‘Conversations aggregate into a low thrum that sounds like oiled loafers swooshing over carpet.’
    • ‘From inauspicious beginnings, they moved up several notches until their three guitars created a vast dynamic, pulsating thrum on the final song.’
    • ‘Suddenly above the steady vibrating thrum of the C130 cargo plane's four giant Rolls-Royce turboprop engines, a sound rings out.’
    • ‘A loud whoop was briefly transmitted from the ship before the only sound was the thrum of the thrusters as the captain throttled them back down.’
    • ‘Suddenly, world news isn't some distant background thrum you can tune out, it's big and it's scary and it's coming to get you.’
    • ‘Get Back pumps along on a resonant thrum of drums and chiming rhythm guitar.’
    • ‘The steady thrum of air-conditioning followed by the click-clack of the overhead fans raged together in a unique symphony.’
    • ‘Water was her favored element, and she had always found the steady thrum of raindrops hitting the earth to be soothing.’
    • ‘The rumbling grew to the sound of thunder and then to the strongest thrum they had ever heard.’
    • ‘The sounds of their talking was a steady thrum in my ears, growing louder and louder as Four's hand on my arm grew tighter and tighter.’
    pitter-patter, tapping, pattering, drumming, drumbeat, clatter, beat, beating, tattoo, pounding, throb, pulsation, rat-a-tat, pit-a-pat, clack, click-clack, clacketing, thrum, thrumming
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 16th century (as a verb): imitative.

Pronunciation

thrum

/θrʌm/

Main definitions of thrum in English

: thrum1thrum2

thrum2

noun

  • 1(in weaving) an unwoven end of a warp thread, or a fringe of such ends, left in the loom when the finished cloth is cut away.

    • ‘Dana made thrum-catcher bags to place by loom and collect little scraps of fiber or yarn for garnetting.’
    • ‘The new yarn is fastened to the old thrum, the ends being united.’
    1. 1.1 Any short loose thread.
      • ‘Dingfa automatic brushing machine is designed to clean the leftover thrum on fabrics’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Cover or adorn (cloth or clothing) with ends of thread.

    • ‘Llama and alpaca yarn is used to make these beautiful mittens which are thrummed with 100% alpaca rovings.’
    • ‘The red sash of royalty is made of net work, and thrummed with red and yellow feathers.’

Origin

Old English thrum (only in tungethrum ‘ligament of the tongue’): of Germanic origin; related to Dutch dreum ‘thrum’ and German Trumm ‘end piece’. The current sense dates from Middle English.

Pronunciation

thrum

/θrʌm/