Definition of throne in English:

throne

noun

  • 1A ceremonial chair for a sovereign, bishop, or similar figure.

    ‘King Solomon's great ivory throne’
    as modifier ‘the throne room’
    • ‘Their resemblance to thrones is an ironic reflection of the violent bases of power.’
    • ‘Its throne room, edict room, and imperial apartments still remain as a monument preserving the dream world of mandarin China.’
    • ‘Two massive golden thrones sat in the center of one end of the enormous room.’
    • ‘Angelique yawned and shifted sideways in the throne for comfort, lifting her legs over the right arm rest.’
    • ‘Greek inscriptions covering the backs of the thrones command Antiochus' people to process up the mountain on the anniversaries of his birth and coronation to make sacrificial offerings on the altar in front of him.’
    • ‘A large and very ornate throne sat on the far wall, but no one occupied it.’
    • ‘Prominent features will be four thrones carved from rock and placed on an axis representing north, south, east and west.’
    • ‘The Holy Spirit advocates Jesus' case and cause to us just as Jesus advocates ours in the heavenly throne room.’
    • ‘Seat your deity on the velvet thrones garnished with the traditional karigari.’
    • ‘There were several seats on either side of the throne, and eight chairs had been placed in a semicircle opposite it.’
    • ‘Out of the shadows behind the gilded throne seat stepped a familiar figure.’
    • ‘The Knossos throne room has a magnificent throne flanked by wall paintings showing griffins and projects an image of divine power.’
    • ‘Their thrones are placed at the gate of the capital city of Israel, a space that was once occupied by a threshing floor prior to the construction of Samaria.’
    • ‘The throne room of Nebuchadnezzar shows some signs of Greek influence in design.’
    • ‘Splayed backs also feature prominently on the coronation thrones made for George III and Queen Charlotte in 1760.’
    • ‘To the right of St Edward's chair was another chair of state in which the King was to sit during the sermon, and opposite this on the north side of the chancel were the purple thrones of the bishops.’
    • ‘He was seated on his throne in a ceremonial Osiris-like pose, but his eyes betrayed his curiosity.’
    • ‘The Throne's many pieces are arranged symmetrically on either side of a main throne chair.’
    • ‘The doors led into a large throne room, decorated with marble pillars and stained glass windows.’
    • ‘Although a comfortable-looking row of chairs sat facing the throne, he did not take a seat.’
    • ‘Hard as it may be for the sort of people who sit on thrones at their weddings to comprehend, it isn't always all about you.’
    • ‘Approach the throne of God with an open, expectant heart.’
    • ‘And I confer upon you a kingdom, just as my Father conferred one on me, so that you may eat and drink at my table in my kingdom and sit on twelve thrones, judging the twelve tribes of Israel.’
    seat of state, royal seat
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1the throne Used to signify sovereign power.
      ‘the heir to the throne’
      • ‘What everybody forgot was that, with no Empress or heirs to the throne, there was a distinct power void.’
      • ‘In the throne speech amendment, you agreed to hold a vote on missile defense.’
      • ‘Henry was recognised as heir to the French throne and regent of France.’
      • ‘When his friend took over the Papal throne, Galileo thought he would finally find a sympathetic ear.’
      • ‘He has never renounced his claim to the throne of a kingdom which no longer exists.’
      • ‘Just because she had a direct line to the throne and its power, she was dotted over and swarmed with flattery and adoration.’
      • ‘Sophia's son ascended the British throne as George I, the first of the Hanoverian kings.’
      • ‘Someone (who will remain nameless) thinks Charles should abdicate the British throne and come out here instead.’
      • ‘They are the powers around the throne, and often they know their own importance.’
      • ‘Let me suggest that for William, heir to the throne, the monarchy is a Gordian knot whose time for cutting is well overdue.’
      • ‘He is mentioned almost weekly as the heir apparent to some imminently vacant throne.’
      • ‘He came to the throne of the Frankish kingdom in 771 and ruled until 814.’
      • ‘Born in Scotland, he moved to England in 1604 after his father ascended the English throne.’
      • ‘To usurp is to wrongfully assume power or the throne, to encroach upon something.’
      • ‘The royal couple left the Netherlands to ascend the British throne in 1689.’
      • ‘But behind the scenes, the powers around the throne understood who they were dealing with.’
      • ‘When he abdicated his throne, the Princes were each given their own fiefdoms.’
      • ‘By law females are ineligible to succeed to the Imperial throne.’
      • ‘His mysterious death in Naples in 1495 ended European hopes of placing a sympathetic figure on the Ottoman throne.’
      • ‘Leaders come and go, but the power is behind the throne.’
      sovereign power, sovereignty, rule, command, dominion
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2humorous A toilet.
      • ‘The toilet is a mighty throne, and the tub is like a giant overturned turtle shell filled with nectar and ambrosia.’
      • ‘It has the city's quirkiest bathrooms - with expertly renovated antique lavatories that are veritable thrones.’
      • ‘I climbed up on the throne and got comfortable and did my business.’
      • ‘We vow to return on the train and try out the ‘twobicles’ - the double thrones in the ladies toilets - or be arrested in the attempt.’
      • ‘A few years ago, one of our local papers printed a cartoon about Elvis' death on the throne.’
    3. 1.3thrones (in traditional Christian angelology) the third-highest order of the ninefold celestial hierarchy.
      • ‘And he is seeking angels, thrones, powers, dominions and arch angels alike to come and join him.’
      • ‘There's a category of angels called "Thrones" who typically appear as wheels in the sky.’

verb

[with object]literary
  • Place (someone) on a throne.

    ‘the king was throned on a rock’
    • ‘However, his reign also didn't last long and in 717 Leo III was throned.’
    • ‘The Chorus mentions that Agamemnon and his brother Menelaus are very similar to each other, ‘twin throned, twin sceptered, in twofold power.’’
    • ‘How long after the invasion until William was throned?’
    • ‘The throned figured pondered the thought for a moment.’
    • ‘On the hill sat two upright throned sarcophagi.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French trone, via Latin from Greek thronos ‘elevated seat’.

Pronunciation

throne

/θrəʊn/