Definition of think in English:

think

verb

  • 1[with clause] Have a particular belief or idea:

    ‘she thought that nothing would be the same again’
    ‘it's thought he may have collapsed from shock’
    [with infinitive] ‘up to 300 people were thought to have died’
    • ‘Although the cause is still being investigated it is not thought to be suspicious.’
    • ‘I think every individual situation is just a little different though they have generalities.’
    • ‘He somehow thinks his case is enhanced by insulting the Ohio law enforcement system.’
    • ‘The danger is that people in the city will think the current situation is just another to add to the list.’
    • ‘We have a good idea what facts the judge would have summed up had he thought the situation required it.’
    • ‘But at their recent meeting, members said they thought the situation was getting better.’
    • ‘Secondly did it mislead the prosecution into thinking the case against him was stronger than it was.’
    • ‘I have no idea why she would think that associating with those people is a good thing.’
    • ‘But nobody thinks that idea worth fighting a war over.’
    • ‘He's an end-of-the-century phenom and I can imagine some people thinking he was the best of the last hundred years.’
    • ‘She should leave Bolton and move somewhere else if she thinks the situation is that bad.’
    • ‘The arrest is not thought to be a significant development in the hunt for the double killer.’
    • ‘He thinks the situation will get worse when Swindon Council takes over illegal parking enforcement from the police.’
    • ‘Not everyone thinks the situation will be that dire, though.’
    • ‘He thinks television situation comedy is garbage and only agrees when the network promises him his own special, a promise which the network reneges upon.’
    • ‘The spokeswoman said that the settlement was thought to have happened above a drain.’
    • ‘The only area where technology is thought to play its part is in the realm of communications.’
    • ‘Forty tonnes of marine diesel are still thought to be on board the sunken vessel.’
    • ‘I think some situations can and should be treated with a bit more of a diplomatic approach!’
    • ‘Inquiries are continuing into the cause of the blaze but it is not thought to be suspicious.’
    deem, judge, hold, reckon, consider, presume, estimate
    believe, be of the opinion, have as one's opinion, be of the view, be under the impression
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Used in questions to express anger or surprise:
      ‘what do you think you're doing?’
    2. 1.2I think Used in speech to reduce the force of a statement, or to politely suggest or refuse something:
      ‘I thought we could go out for a meal’
      • ‘If you read any of my books I think you'll find quite a lot about not killing in there.’
      • ‘Tonight is my last night in Preston for a while so I am going for a few pints and a curry I think.’
      • ‘The very fact that we have moved beyond the age of deference supports my case I think.’
      • ‘So with dinner in mind and a recent chat to people in Spain, I think a small sherry is in order.’
  • 2[no object] Direct one's mind towards someone or something; use one's mind actively to form connected ideas:

    ‘he was thinking about Colin’
    ‘Jack thought for a moment’
    [with object] ‘any writer who so rarely produces a book is not thinking deep thoughts’
    • ‘I thought always of death, and therefore I had only one sorrow: the certainty of having to die.’
    • ‘Then I look into the glass and think about the workers in the brewery and all of their hopes and dreams.’
    • ‘I just sat in my chair for a few moments, my mouth silent, my mind thinking.’
    • ‘Natural selection did not design our minds to think directly about how best to pass on our genes.’
    • ‘They need to learn mental disciplines - to think, to count and to ask questions.’
    • ‘The adrenaline kept you going, made sure your mind was thinking quickly.’
    • ‘My mind thinks like a person who's born in 65 and lived in the 70s and 80s.’
    • ‘Creative minds think at the speed of lightning but the fingers move as any average digits would!’
    • ‘In my mind I was thinking ahead all the time whereas I should have been taking advantage of the situation that I was in at the time.’
    • ‘He sat back for a moment, thinking, prodding with his mind towards any intention the man might have.’
    • ‘The more you understand why something has turned out the way it has, the more you can empathise and think with an open mind.’
    • ‘Here we find him as a mind thinking deeply on problems Pakistanis are faced with.’
    • ‘At a time when scripts are written with ‘stars’ in mind, Bhadran thinks differently.’
    • ‘There are two people in this known universe who know what my conspiracy-laden mind is thinking.’
    • ‘Such is the methodology of the mind… it thinks not of perils when enticed by joy.’
    • ‘Frequently, the best solutions are arrived at by thinking outside the standard approach.’
    • ‘I took a moment to read what his mind is thinking, but he quickly guarded his thoughts.’
    • ‘With this in mind, let us think for a moment about the surface of a sphere.’
    • ‘He hadn't cast it a second thought for years but rediscovering the old treasure set his mind thinking.’
    • ‘If you have too much time on your hands to think, eventually your mind will create problems.’
    ponder, reflect, deliberate, meditate, contemplate, muse, cogitate, ruminate, be lost in thought, be in a brown study, brood
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 Have a particular mental attitude or approach:
      ‘he thought like a general’
      [with complement] ‘one should always think positive’
      • ‘You torture yourself endlessly by thinking negatively and imagining the worst today.’
      • ‘And we have to have an educational approach, which thinks in these kinds of terms.’
      • ‘You tend to imagine the worst by thinking negatively and torturing yourself endlessly today!’
      • ‘It might even be more uncomfortable to see the world through the mind of someone who thinks exactly like you do.’
      • ‘If you are minded to think small, then the association would love to welcome you.’
      • ‘You imagine the worst by thinking negatively without good reason.’
      • ‘I don't think this is what people think here, and it will be suicidal in - in the mind of anyone who thinks rightly.’
    2. 2.2think of/about Take into consideration when deciding on a possible action:
      ‘you can live how you like, but there's the children to think about’
      • ‘We need to think of possible legal complications in all sorts of routine situations.’
      • ‘Make sure you have thought of the possible gains and losses if you took the leap.’
      • ‘Nature, of course, thinks of everything and it seems that a nudibranch getting its own sperm or eggs is impossible.’
      • ‘Critics would also hope she seriously thinks about the wounds she will be reopening - and calls the play off.’
      • ‘I know most of you are great people but please think of others when you light up your next cigarette.’
      • ‘The tendency is to take what he wants, and act as he wants without thinking of the possible effect on others.’
    3. 2.3think of Call to mind:
      ‘lemon thyme is a natural pair with any chicken dish you can think of’
      • ‘He had done it since he was a kid, and had done it every way possible a human could think of.’
      • ‘Whatever you can think of in the world of news and specialist information, they're in it in a big way.’
      • ‘Maybe I am of gifted intelligence and can think of more than one number at once.’
      • ‘Two years later she can think of no reason why anyone would do it - and neither can experienced detectives.’
      • ‘These types of Virus writers will use just about any occasion they can think of to act on computer users.’
      • ‘But for me, these remembrances are the best way I can think of to give you a sense of an age long gone.’
      • ‘I can think of no better example of perfect symbiosis of image and music.’
      • ‘I can think of some cases where a marina actually adds to the beauty and charm of a place.’
      • ‘I can think of worse things to be called than a journalist, but not many.’
      • ‘But today Matthew is the only person I can think of like that in that age range.’
      • ‘I can think of quite a lot of those in high places who, if they were to receive a good dose of Britishness, it would do them a power of good.’
      • ‘I can think of about half a dozen malcontents who would love a contest.’
      • ‘It is possible to think of a number of ways in which reciprocity might sustain medical altruism.’
      • ‘My first sales call was to the biggest possible customer I could think of.’
      • ‘The only thing we can think of is that they want to break the pattern [of agreements] in the industry.’
      • ‘If you can think of an animal, the likelihood is it would be made into a rug somewhere in the house, with its head mounted on the walls.’
      • ‘High school is closer to the core of the American experience than anything else I can think of.’
      • ‘The only acceptable reason I can think of is to bring attention to the fact that it was a life-long condition.’
      • ‘I can think of two federal ministers whose basic approach to women journalists is to flirt.’
      • ‘We have to come together as a team and try and think of the best possible way to find Jack.’
      recall, remember, recollect, call to mind, bring to mind, think back to, review
      View synonyms
    4. 2.4think of/about Consider the possibility or advantages of (a course of action):
      ‘he was thinking of becoming a zoologist’
      • ‘Recently, I've been thinking of doing a course with the Open University - which is probably a good thing to do.’
      • ‘If you are thinking of gifting them, consider shelling out around a lakh of rupees or more.’
      • ‘I'm thinking of creating a place here with links and reviews of site for kids.’
      • ‘If you are thinking about setting up a course then you should think through these issues.’
      • ‘Opinion: anyone who thinks of trying to track down these boys and commit some sort of revenge act against them is as low as any other perpetrator of violence.’
      • ‘Mr Lee said that reports suggested the Chancellor was thinking of a 6p rise on beer in the Budget.’
      • ‘The interior minister certainly wasn't thinking of creating a data graveyard.’
      • ‘This is an expense you might not have considered when thinking about moving to the seaside.’
      • ‘I was thinking of going light with some goodies, music and some games and paper to write and draw with.’
      • ‘She thinks of running away but realizes that it would be useless to try.’
      • ‘Any television producer thinking of developing the idea should first of all contact the author of the above, who will not be hard to deal with.’
      • ‘I asked if she ever considered the danger or thought of fleeing the aftershocks and the tumbling buildings.’
      • ‘Now I am about to start a clinical doctorate I am thinking of doing an art course.’
      • ‘He said it will be of benefit to all clients thinking of developing R&D projects.’
      consider, contemplate, give thought to, entertain the idea of, deliberate about, weigh up, turn over in one's mind, mull over, chew over, reflect on, ruminate about, muse on
      View synonyms
    5. 2.5think to do something Have sufficient foresight or awareness to do something:
      ‘I hadn't thought to warn Rachel about him’
      • ‘There was a timber yard next door and someone thought to test the process on pine.’
      • ‘Sadly for me, nobody ever thought to test the damn thing on the Firth of Clyde on a Tuesday.’
    6. 2.6 Imagine or expect (an actual or possible situation):
      ‘think of being paid a salary to hunt big game!’
      [with clause] ‘I never thought we'd raise so much money’
      • ‘Of course not and just think of the massive amount of money we would gain and how much red tape we would lose.’
      imagine, picture, visualize, envisage, envision
      View synonyms
    7. 2.7think oneself into Imagine what it would be like to be in (a position or role):
      ‘she tried to think herself into the part of Peter's fiancée’
      • ‘I've got no problem with anyone thinking themselves into an early grave.’
      • ‘On top of that we had to think ourselves into how the character feels.’
      • ‘Novelists have been keen to think themselves into the position of the victims (though because they relish the danger and are spared the death, the morality of the effort remains questionable).’
      • ‘‘I had so much fun thinking myself into Bessy's head and her sayings like: ‘I couldn't care the core of a cabbage.’’
      • ‘But it was another extreme example of him thinking himself into the part.’
      • ‘One way to tackle these sorts of questions is modern social theory; another is to try to think oneself into a prehistoric frame of mind.’
      • ‘I am trying to think myself into a really rather complicated argument, and still at the stage where you take the old machine apart, and the whole workshop is a mess of bits and scruff.’
      • ‘The ‘orthodox’ historians, he continues, ‘make no attempt to think themselves into the minds of their subjects,’ instead attributing to them views on race that did not emerge until the twentieth century.’
      • ‘Astor put the receiver down and started to think himself into tycoon mode.’
      • ‘Then again, maybe I'm just thinking too much about the entire thing and succeeding only in thinking myself into knots.’
      • ‘These historians make no attempt to think themselves into the minds of their subjects.’
      • ‘I would think myself into the character and then see the world totally through their eyes.’
      • ‘They were trying to imagine what it would have been like, thinking themselves into that instant: standing on a beach, hearing the roar, running for their lives.’
      • ‘Unlike Gwyneth Paltrow in Sliding Doors (a spiritually similar film) who was called upon to play essentially the same character twice, here Mitchell has to think herself into two spaces completely.’
      • ‘This is the nature of empathy, to think oneself into the minds of others.’
      • ‘We have to try and think ourselves into a state of mind now that there is one, rather than all the time saying I do not want one.’
      • ‘This weekend, I just went out there to race and not think myself into a problem.’
      • ‘Sometimes, intelligent people can think themselves into trouble.’
      • ‘In that time he had to think himself into the mind of Luke Mitchell.’
      • ‘You are thinking yourself into new kitchen mode when all you were after was a cut-price polo neck.’
  • 3think of[no object] Have a specified opinion of:

    ‘she did not think highly of modern art’
    ‘what would John think of her?’
    ‘I think of him as a friend’
    • ‘The thing is, it feels to me like you're thinking of game development as big business, corporate, organised fare.’
    • ‘This is her response when asked what she thought of the screenplay upon first read.’
    • ‘Lucy Stephens and Dan Jones asked all sections of society what they thought of the Chancellor's cash plans.’
    • ‘Fortunately, I consoled myself with discovering what Google thought of this site instead.’
    • ‘You can't help wondering what Eileen Caddy thinks of the new developments.’
    • ‘My opinion of myself is very much either reinforced or rejected based upon what others think of me.’
    • ‘Surfinia is a combination of surf and petunia and the plants were originally thought of as ground cover.’
    • ‘He spent most of his political life on what would be thought of in modern terms as the left of politics.’
    • ‘What would those who lost their lives now think of what we are creating from their sacrifice?’
    • ‘Just as our opinion of an individual is not based on what he thinks of himself, so can we not judge of such a period of transformation by its own consciousness.’
    • ‘We are used to thinking of modern international society as reaffirming the value of anarchic political structure.’
    • ‘Buschert has also appeared at city council to let them know what she thinks of the development in her neighbourhood.’
    • ‘As for theories - try thinking of 'em as opinions or models, rather than unquestionable facts.’
    • ‘She also excels at things we think of as entirely modern, such as walkabouts.’
    • ‘Hope you enjoyed the above and I would be interested to see what anyone else thinks of my opinions and whether you agree or disagree.’
    • ‘In fact, have at least some of us not implicitly been thinking of the originator as something like a causal circumstance?’
    • ‘He has not hazarded an opinion of what he thinks of the subject of his study, the bizarre chain of consequences he unleashed and the political context of these new developments.’
    • ‘She told him that in her opinion very few people thought of her a lady.’
    • ‘Public opinion tends to think of carbon dioxide as a waste product or even a poison.’
    • ‘Whatever you think of modern music, the state of rock nomenclature has never been healthier.’

noun

informal
  • [in singular] An act of thinking:

    ‘I went for a walk to have a think’
    • ‘On the way there, looking at Raymond with his sticky eyes and swelling cut, I had a bit of a think.’
    • ‘Have a think and post me a reply, who would society be better off without?’
    • ‘Sit on the bed a few minutes to have a think.’
    • ‘So I had a little think and a bit of a search to check and came up with this list.’
    • ‘Just before settling in for the night Leo decided to go outside and have a think and a cigarette.’
    • ‘Anyway, we had a think in the office but were stumped for specific local Melbourne myths.’
    • ‘She was very upset but she very quickly stopped crying and had a think.’
    • ‘When I stopped coughing and spluttering, we sat down, had a think and decided to let her have one.’
    • ‘So, at the moment the email is sitting in my inbox with an action flag beside it while I have a think.’
    ponder, muse, period of contemplation, period of deliberation, period of reflection, spell of contemplation, spell of deliberation, spell of reflection
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • have (got) another think coming

    • informal Used to express the speaker's disagreement with or unwillingness to do something suggested by someone else:

      ‘if they think I'm going to do physical jerks, they've got another think coming’
      • ‘Any woman still thinking that men are like buses and there'll be another one along in a minute has another think coming.’
      • ‘If they thought that they could get away with it, they have another think coming.’
      • ‘Closest rival Microsoft has well-publicised problems of its own - and even if it overcomes these, the accelerating pretender has another think coming if it imagines that it has an easy shot at becoming world number one.’
      • ‘If we think - despite what I've said about us being better than last year - if we think even for a moment that we are good enough with the present squad to win the championship next season, then we will have another think coming.’
      • ‘If you thought the ethnic game, which held in thrall several generations, had paled into insignificance in the wake of the popularity of spectacle sports such as cricket and football, you have another think coming.’
      • ‘But if someone thinks we are going to be driven away they have another think coming.’
      • ‘If you think I want to model in discount catalogues for the rest of my life, you have another think coming.’
      • ‘London will have taken some heart from our recent results but if they think they can turn us over, they have another think coming.’
      • ‘That may satisfy some people suffering from Frankenfood fixation, but if they think proud British eco-warriors are going to be put off by the facts, they have another think coming…’
      • ‘Those who may think so have another think coming.’
  • think again

    • Reconsider something:

      ‘the advisory committee must think again about its approach’
      • ‘Politicians who have issued intemperate attacks on the apathy of the young must think again.’
      • ‘But I really think, Howie, at this particular time and in the history of CBS News maybe I can be of some help to try to get everybody thinking again and not about what has just happened recently.’
      • ‘She said: ‘It might be that people have thought again about postal voting because of the uncertainty.’’
      • ‘It is then that the public and the private intersect and people start thinking again about marriage.’
      • ‘He laughs, he makes fun of himself, he says absurd things and then takes them back, and then thinks again and doesn't - he actually enjoys himself.’
      • ‘Those who claim Australia will never have to respond because the international community will never agree had better start thinking again or they will end up in the same category as security advisors who said the Berlin Wall was forever.’
      • ‘The charity had intended to give the book away in a raffle but when a London valuer advised them it was worth £1, 500 they thought again.’
      • ‘He put it away - and then thought again, brought it back and examined it some more.’
      • ‘If it does turn out that truth is stranger than your fiction, you must think again.’
      • ‘If they thought that there would be a news blackout on their actions they must now think again.’
      rethink, review, revise, re-examine, re-evaluate, reassess, reappraise, think better of, think over, take another look at, look at in a different light, have another think about
      View synonyms
  • think aloud

    • Express one's thoughts as soon as they occur:

      ‘no definite proposal, my dear chap—just thinking aloud’
      • ‘He was thinking aloud, trying to work out what he thought about this medium he had never worked in before.’
      • ‘The general has thought aloud about his ‘alternative dream’ and gone ahead with the construction of Gwadar deep-sea port.’
      • ‘‘The more I sit here,’ I said, thinking aloud, ‘the more I am surprised how many small creatures there are living in the garden, and around it.’’
      • ‘‘Well, we have a couple of guys who worked for the Army during the war, developing plastics,’ he says, thinking aloud.’
      • ‘Sterling, speaking to a crowd at the Microsoft Campus, thought aloud about the problem.’
      • ‘I'm just thinking aloud really, trying to sort some things out for myself.’
      • ‘I'm thinking aloud a bit here, but the party machine doesn't seem to have quite the same grip in a ward system.’
      • ‘He thinks aloud: ‘I should try a contemporary one.’’
      • ‘‘They'll probably be chasing us as soon as they can start their cars,’ she thought aloud.’
      • ‘It was just a daft thought, I was thinking aloud.’
  • think (the) better of

    • 1Decide not to do (something) after reconsideration:

      ‘he turned to shoot, then thought better of it’
      • ‘Later, thinking better of how this would look, they put the documents back in the box, put gloves on, and staged photographs of themselves opening the box properly.’
      • ‘I was going to repot the pepper seedlings, but having felt the temperature of the compost I thought better of it.’
      • ‘I was tempted to use the toilet brush instead but thought better of it.’
      • ‘I nearly asked what the crisis was about, but I thought better of it.’
      • ‘Then, as if coming out of a reverie, he shook his head gently, thinking better of whatever was on his mind.’
      • ‘Initial thoughts were to go day tripping in Kent but I felt a little ropey this morning and thought better of it.’
      • ‘I contemplated asking the clerk to excuse James because it was only his second day of work experience, but thought better of it.’
      • ‘I was about to add that it wasn't professionalism but a lack of it that accounted for the club's problems, but then thought better of it.’
      • ‘You think better of the prank and decide to avoid certain detention.’
      • ‘This turns out to be one of those jobs that you don't think better of until it's way too late.’
      have second thoughts about, think twice about, think again about, change one's mind about
      reconsider, decide against
      get cold feet about
      View synonyms
    • 2Form a better opinion of:

      ‘his lie would not make us think better of him’
      • ‘He made me think better of the Party.’
      • ‘I for one will think better of him if he is a crook.’
      • ‘I always think better of a person who is willing to admit error than one who tries to pin the blame on subordinates.’
      • ‘My experience is that citizens think better of MPs once they know more about them.’
      • ‘If she had thought better of her brother then she might have thought it was planned that way.’
  • think big

    • informal Be ambitious.

      • ‘‘I went in thinking big and the idea got pared down a bit,’ she says.’
      • ‘This gives them a double chance, and must give them the incentive to think big.’
      • ‘Under his chairmanship, the club thought big and aimed high - then ultimately fell hard when the dreams failed to come true and the lavish spending off the pitch failed to translate into success on it.’
      • ‘The logo is the mark of a bank thinking big and growing into an ambitious and resplendent entity.’
      • ‘It thinks big, has a vision of the future and measures each step it will take.’
      • ‘I have always thought big and it seems to have paid off.’
      • ‘Donald learned the business from his father, but with a twist: He thought big, very BIG.’
      • ‘His energy was unflagging, he thought big and bold.’
      • ‘In business terms and culturally we are very similar: a small people thinking big, and I urge any ambitious company to go for it.’
      • ‘It has a wonderful under-age structure and everybody involved in the club thinks big about all issues, always wanting to improve.’
    • informal

      see big
  • think fit

  • think for oneself

    • Have an independent mind or attitude:

      ‘the aim is to get the students to think for themselves’
      • ‘It's the paradox of pedagogy: how to teach students to think for themselves.’
      • ‘Some people just cannot understand the whole concept of thinking for yourself.’
      • ‘My pedagogical aim is to encourage students to think for themselves, to awaken their consciences.’
      • ‘This relieves the candidate of having to think for himself - and also reduces the political risk that an independent or contrary position entails.’
      • ‘The central core of punk is all about being an individual and thinking for yourself.’
      • ‘Like the best of teachers, Sontag stirs the imagination, ultimately encouraging readers to engage their minds and think for themselves.’
      • ‘Help is fine when needed but we do not want these young minds not to think for themselves.’
      • ‘People who talk about education have forever been mouthing aphorisms about teaching students to think for themselves.’
      • ‘Fortunately for me I'm lucky to have a child who thinks for himself, who is open to the idea that we don't have to follow the nearest crowd.’
      • ‘In short, we must train students to think for themselves.’
  • think nothing of

    • Consider (an activity others regard as unusual, wrong, or difficult) as straightforward or normal:

      ‘ordinarily, our elected representatives would think nothing of spending another $20 billion’
      • ‘Indeed, in the weight room, players supervise one another and think nothing of stopping a teammate's exercise if his form is wrong.’
      • ‘Also, these parents have no regard for local residents and think nothing of blocking access to a resident's property while collecting their little darlings.’
      • ‘That must take quite a lot of managing, but Sir thinks nothing of spending a whole lunchtime stalking a couple of boys who've sloped off for a fag.’
      • ‘When I was a little kid, I thought nothing of tossing a gum wrapper on the ground, and was even known to hurl debris from our car window.’
      • ‘He thinks nothing of resorting to adolescent activity when his mother's Steuben egg and his father's Porsche are damaged and tries to cover this up by turning the home into a brothel.’
      • ‘They think nothing of two more hours at the end of the day.’
      • ‘Him not turning up at the bookshop he ran wasn't unusual, so the guys who worked there thought nothing of him not coming in that Wednesday morning.’
      • ‘She thinks nothing of spending a 12-hour day in an incredibly hot, fly-infested canvas lab.’
      • ‘She thinks little of seeking vengeance for wrongs, tripping out on magic mushrooms and, in an especially lovely moment of controlled atmosphere, engaging in a spot of Ouija board shenanigans.’
      • ‘Sometimes the disjunction is so severe that the patient thinks nothing of even severing a part of the body, like the famous painter Van Gogh who chopped off his ears.’
      consider normal, consider usual, consider routine, take in one's stride, not think twice about
      have no problems with, have no compunction about, have no hesitation about
      View synonyms
  • think nothing of it

    • Do not apologize or feel bound to show gratitude (used as a polite response).

  • think on one's feet

    • React to events decisively, effectively, and without prior thought.

      • ‘No matter what the TV says, taking an umbrella to work is thinking on your feet.’
      • ‘She was improvising and having to think on her feet.’
      • ‘He is insightful, he has his act together, he understands what makes national security tick - and he thinks on his feet somewhere around Mach 3.’
      • ‘He has all the physical gifts, but he also thinks on his feet.’
      • ‘I am sort of thinking on my feet here as I react to the information from my two correspondents and from other sources.’
      • ‘He thought on his feet, a very bright individual as far as prisoners go.’
      • ‘How the candidates think on their feet and react to the audience can be a telling sign as to how they will act once they are in office.’
      • ‘I can see Dallas not knowing what to do, but the other three are veterans and talk about not thinking on your feet or reacting to circumstances.’
      • ‘What marks Aparna's game is that she has a variety of strokes and she thinks on her feet.’
      • ‘It's going to be a case of common sense and thinking on your feet.’
  • think twice

    • Consider a course of action carefully before embarking on it:

      ‘she would think twice about accepting a job where smoking was the norm’
      • ‘‘I don't know how people don't know what's right and what's wrong,’ he says, giving no suggestion that he thought twice about going to war.’
      • ‘Last year, many swimmers thought twice about entering the surf.’
      • ‘Of course, once I thought twice about holiday math, I realized that 16.7 percent of all days occur during November and December.’
      • ‘One day, perhaps not too far away, recycling won't be thought twice about (it's already second nature in many European nations).’
      • ‘And should parents think twice before enrolling their children on scuba courses?’
      • ‘I might have read these lines in any of hundreds of reports over the last decade or so, and the sad thing is that I wouldn't have thought twice about it.’
      • ‘I suspect a number of adults would have thought twice about doing what you did.’
      • ‘Another study, by the Canadian Cancer Society, found 58% of smokers who saw photographic warnings on packets thought twice about the health costs of smoking.’
      • ‘In my pocket, I'm picking at one corner of the envelope, thinking twice about giving it to him, even thinking twice about taking the thing out of my pocket.’
      • ‘A few years ago in Atlanta, I wouldn't have thought twice about this scene.’
  • think the world of

    • Have a very high regard for:

      ‘I thought the world of my father’
      • ‘The boy thinks the world of Emilio, appreciating the kind and attentive way he treats him and his mom.’
      • ‘Steven was a shy, quiet lad but when he came out of his shell and people got to know him, they thought the world of him.’
      • ‘He thought the world of his sisters and brother.’
      • ‘And you also have three loving children who think the world of you so please don't get upset- or angry- over the confrontation this afternoon.’
      • ‘He thought the world of us and would have hated for us to be unhappy.’
      • ‘‘He must have thought the world of his sister,’ says the woman, ‘to do all these commemorative things for her.’’
      • ‘She thought the world of all the children she taught over the years.’
      • ‘Her family were her pride and joy and she was devoted to them and they in turn thought the world of her.’
      • ‘I think the world of my mum, as she is so kind, caring and loving to all of us.’
      • ‘After my father died, when I was 23, I discovered through others that he thought the world of me.’
      adore, hold dear, love, care very much for, feel great affection for, dote on, be devoted to, revere, esteem, admire, appreciate
      View synonyms

Phrasal Verbs

  • think back

    • Recall a past event or time:

      ‘I keep thinking back to school’
      • ‘Just think back to this past summer and the drama surrounding Taylor's decision to step down.’
      • ‘When rugby fans think back on past Lions tours, there is invariably one moment that sticks in the mind.’
      • ‘Barden thinks back through the past few years and it is easy to spot the games they should have won and the opportunities missed.’
      • ‘When these natives actually do settle down, they may find themselves continually thinking back on their many past affairs.’
      • ‘Yet, if you think back over the past decade or so the range and frequency of scandals is astonishing.’
      • ‘Kelly thought back now on the events that had set them all on this catastrophic course.’
      • ‘He shook his head with slight pain as he thought back to the previous events.’
      • ‘I put the blade back in my pocket to as I thought back into the past.’
      • ‘I think back to the past and recall that it is the table at which we used to discuss politics or at which I wrote my first book.’
      • ‘As I was throwing my last bag into our car, I started thinking back on this past year.’
  • think on

    • Think of or about:

      ‘I think on her every day in my prayers’
      • ‘She thought on this for a moment and looked back up at him with a shy smile.’
      • ‘He shook his head, and poured himself another drink, and thought on her last words.’
      • ‘If you ever consider going into business for yourself, think on this.’
      • ‘He had been bored so he thought on going to visit Carla and Kaze for the weekend.’
      • ‘They both thought on it for several more hours, but neither of them said anything about it.’
      • ‘Her annoyance began to grow, and the more she thought on it, the worse it became.’
      • ‘She thought on each and every one of these during the ride home, not speaking a word the entire way.’
      • ‘As boys came into her mind for a change, she thought on the dark-eyed guy that had been at the stables.’
      • ‘Your point should be a revelation to those who would think on what you have said.’
      • ‘She thought on that for a minute, but the answer had been clear the minute John had asked the question.’
      consider, contemplate, give thought to, entertain the idea of, deliberate about, weigh up, turn over in one's mind, mull over, chew over, reflect on, ruminate about, muse on
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  • think something out (or through)

    • Consider something in all its aspects before taking action:

      ‘the plan had not been properly thought out’
      • ‘Well, um… okay, we maybe haven't thought this part out too far ahead.’
      • ‘I think the people who say such things haven't quite thought the point out.’
      • ‘And after I thought it out, it seemed to me that this was the best alternative for me.’
      • ‘Many suggestions were thought out and considered as hours flew by with still no real progress.’
      • ‘We thought things out together, slowly at first.’
      • ‘Every aspect of the house has been thought out in great detail, but for Eleanor the most appealing benefits are the views.’
      • ‘If we'd thought it out, we probably wouldn't have done it this way.’
      • ‘It is not a plan whose consequences have been thought out.’
      • ‘I just wonder if anyone thinks their purchases out so clearly, with such an eye on the origins of the product.’
      • ‘There were some last-minute additions to the program, but they weren't thought out properly.’
  • think something over

    • Consider something carefully:

      ‘he told the player to go home and think over his offer’
      • ‘Let us suppose, for the sake of argument, that this guard did in fact stop to think things over carefully.’
      • ‘So the frog thinks it over for a minute and decides to accept the offer.’
      • ‘He thought the problem over carefully, then nodded.’
      • ‘He listened to those stories and at night he thought them over in his mind.’
      • ‘I studied the sweet counter intently, selecting a range of my favourite goodies, counting up the pennies, thinking it over carefully.’
      • ‘I had a place lined up, I thought it over, I mused, I pondered, I decided to go with it.’
      • ‘‘At the end of the season, I will think things over carefully and decide whether I should ever bowl again,’ he added.’
      • ‘Kyle thought the matter over, pondering what the possible ramifications could be, hoping to summon some memory buried in his mind by his father.’
      • ‘Winthrop thought my question over carefully as he mashed the pills up with a paperweight and drenched the mess with applesauce so he could eat it with the spoon attachment on his Swiss Army knife.’
      • ‘Carefully, she thought the words over in her head.’
      consider, contemplate, deliberate about, weigh up, consider the pros and cons of, mull over, ponder, reflect on, muse on, ruminate on
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  • think something up

    • Use one's ingenuity to devise something:

      ‘Nick went away to think up an alternative plan’
      • ‘It's such a weird contrivance, I keep wondering who thought it up.’
      • ‘A lot of credit must go to the people who have thought this event up and organised it, and people have responded with a very good turnout.’
      • ‘Woolrich, after all, thought this stuff up and wrote it down.’
      • ‘Whoever thinks these things up needs some help.’
      • ‘If some money-blood-sucking movie sharks thought the thing up, it would be just that.’
      • ‘I'll be glad to credit you in the acknowledgments with having thought it up, and send you an autographed copy saying the same…’
      • ‘Whoever thought this idea up should have his head examined.’
      • ‘Whoever thought this crazy policy up should be seeking alternative employment.’
      • ‘The guy who thought this excuse up was ultra creative, and as such, I had to share this one with you…’
      • ‘Maybe I'll be the one who brings it before you because I have thought it up, dreamed of it.’
      devise, dream up, come up with, invent, create, concoct, contrive, improvise, make up
      hit on
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Origin

Old English thencan, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch and German denken.

Pronunciation:

think

/θɪŋk/