Definition of thimbleful in English:

thimbleful

noun

  • A small quantity of liquid, especially alcohol:

    ‘a thimbleful of brandy’
    • ‘Whenever one of us would pour a thimbleful into his cup, the other two would jealously measure the outpouring with their eyes.’
    • ‘Just a thimbleful of such water is sufficient to transform a healthy person, in hours, into a deathly ill cholera sufferer.’
    • ‘An over-eager fellow taster twirls his glass with a flourish and sends four deadly thimblefuls of Pinot Noir flying in your direction.’
    • ‘Rub a thimbleful of water over your face and wipe off to finish.’
    • ‘The typical daily food ration was, according to one civilian, ‘five slices bread, half a small cutlet, half a tumbler of milk, two thimblefuls of fat, a few potatoes and an eggcup of sugar’.’
    • ‘I was instantly reminded of my time in Italy, where I spent all day and night in pavement cafes, sipping thimblefuls of espresso, strong and bitter.’
    • ‘There will also be plenty of Glaswegian humour, a thimbleful of alcohol or two, and not a Hooray Henry in sight.’
    • ‘A bird had flown up at me, curious about my beer, so I consciously poured a thimbleful down to his ledge.’
    • ‘She says, ‘Mother had always been a binge drunker, not touching a thimbleful for weeks or months when she'd gotten her gullet full.’’
    • ‘Turns out there was only a thimbleful of stuff left in the bottle, Jack just hadn't gotten around to throwing it out.’
    • ‘Matron allowed me to come too, for a while, to watch, pirouette around and drink a thimbleful of ginger wine.’
    • ‘You could wait until you've got only a thimbleful of gas in there, but why not fill up now and forget about it for the next 60,000 miles?’
    bit, spot, dram, nip, drop, splash
    little, some, small amount
    scoosh
    View synonyms

Pronunciation:

thimbleful

/ˈθɪmb(ə)lfʊl/