Definition of thick in English:

thick

adjective

  • 1With opposite sides or surfaces that are far or relatively far apart.

    ‘thick slices of bread’
    ‘thick metal cables’
    ‘the walls are 5 feet thick’
    • ‘Her light footsteps could be seen in the thick blanket of snow.’
    • ‘A scar ran from above his right eye, across his nose and mouth, and ended just below the left side of his thick lips.’
    • ‘There was a thick layer of dust on the top of the television.’
    • ‘She laughed, then entered, the thick door closing behind her.’
    • ‘No one had visited here for a long time and everything was covered by a thick layer of dust and the musty smell that accompanied a dwelling no one inhabited anymore.’
    • ‘I came very close to picking the thick tome up the other day, but some stubborn impulse in me resisted.’
    • ‘The wood floor creaked as they explored the old furniture and boxes that had dust inches thick layering them.’
    • ‘I looked down to see new footprints in the thick layer of dust.’
    • ‘Beneath his arm, he carried a thick, leather-bound book; it's title scrawled on the cover in an embellished silver font.’
    • ‘The ice that covers the surface is probably too thick to allow sunlight through.’
    • ‘To the south there are high mountains, covered in thick spring snow.’
    • ‘I closed the thick oak door and peered in the little window.’
    • ‘The burgers they dine on are suitably beefy without being too big, with stacks of thick fries on the side.’
    • ‘I arrived about fifteen minutes early, and leaned against a thick tree, closing my eyes for a moment.’
    • ‘It was mid-December, cold, and a thick blanket of snow covered everything.’
    • ‘A thick blanket of snow thwarted the efforts of search and rescue teams hunting for the missing girl yesterday, prolonging the agony for her family.’
    • ‘How fantastic it would be to wake up on Christmas morning, pull back the curtains and see the landscape covered by a thick layer of snow.’
    • ‘The district woke up to a thick blanket of snow this morning as the winter entered its most bitter phase.’
    • ‘She looked across her room to the desk on the other side, the thick book on top of it waiting to be read.’
    • ‘The room was covered in a thick layer of dust, and it looked as though no one had been there in years, but whoever had been there last was surely not welcome.’
    in diameter, in extent, across, wide, broad, deep
    stocky, sturdy, chunky, dumpy, hefty, thickset, beefy, meaty, broad, large, big, bulky, solid, substantial
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (of a garment or other knitted or woven item) made of heavy material.
      ‘a thick sweater’
      • ‘She saw a man carrying a bundle wrapped in thick blankets.’
      • ‘People started coming to school with thick jackets and other winter clothing.’
      • ‘With the thick gloves on, I couldn't adjust the belt.’
      • ‘Rebecca toyed with the edge of the thick blanket closest to her face, knowing her sickness would not allow her any sleep.’
      • ‘Eventually, he prised himself out of bed, pulled on fur-lined boots, a warm hat and a thick jacket, and wandered outside.’
      • ‘Mr Whitby said the man was quite large, wearing a baseball cap and a thick coat, which looked out of place in the warm weather.’
      • ‘Bundled up in a thick jacket, scarf and gloves, Nicholas went outside.’
      • ‘So I decided the only solution was to carry my flat boots, hat and thick scarf with me.’
      • ‘Keyes puts on thick socks to keep her feet warm and curls up informally.’
      • ‘He quickly dressed in a thick sweater and jacket before walking out of his room.’
      • ‘I should probably turn off the heater, put on a thick sweater and go to bed.’
      • ‘The evidence was overwhelming: why was he wearing a thick coat and hat on what was a glorious early September New York morning?’
      • ‘Time to get the thermal long johns out of the dresser and bring my thick socks forward to the front of the drawer.’
      • ‘And it was so cold that even wearing thick jumpers at night left you shivering.’
      • ‘She got out the thick oven mitts that she carried for such occasions, and picked up the jar with the intention of claiming the reward for herself.’
      • ‘I wasn't sure where she had gotten them from, but she was now dressed in a thick jacket and pants, with black mittens and boots.’
      • ‘She watched as he buttoned up his thick coat and pulled gloves onto his hands.’
      • ‘Less than ten minutes later, they were curled up on the sofa together under a thick blanket, each clasping a mug of tea.’
      • ‘And, as long as your socks are thick, they're actually quite warm.’
      • ‘They get so excited, those girls, when they get a chance to dress up in their thick scarves.’
      chunky, bulky, heavy, cable-knit, heavyweight
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    2. 1.2 (of writing or printing) consisting of broad lines.
      ‘a headline in thick black type’
      • ‘His pencil went flying and left a thick, black line across the work he'd been doing.’
      • ‘On closer inspection, however, the reader would have spotted that the seven columns of adverts were separated by thick black lines.’
      • ‘It'll generally be a pretty thick print.’
      • ‘Her pen drew a nice, thick, black line across a column of handwriting.’
      • ‘Feel free to use any font you like, but try to pick one with thick letters.’
      • ‘It is a display font whose forms are extremely thick, up to the extent of being nearly illegible.’
      • ‘Currently the space for their father on the document is struck through with a thick black line as though he was unknown or the children illegitimate.’
      • ‘I've got a problem with I's and L's showing up too thick in my PDFs.’
  • 2Made up of a large number of things or people close together.

    ‘his hair was long and thick’
    ‘the road winds through thick forest’
    • ‘He had a goatee and thick eyebrows that hung over dark eyes.’
    • ‘We sped along a busy dual carriageway, lined with thick bushes and rocky outcrops.’
    • ‘At the end of the three-hour journey, the thick forests thin out revealing a much-used pathway which slopes abruptly to the bed of a nearby river.’
    • ‘It is an area dense with the thick woods and craggy terrain of a largely virgin Arctic rain forest.’
    • ‘By dawn, when we can see a little, we realise that we are in the midst of thick forests.’
    • ‘His features were fine and the hair that was tied loosely behind his head was thick and a rich dark brown.’
    • ‘He was tall and lanky, with small round glasses and a close cap of thick curls.’
    • ‘Nelson frowned, his thick eyebrows pulling together into a solid line.’
    • ‘They are large, burrowing, nocturnal animals, with strong claws and a thick coat.’
    • ‘She was fair-skinned, her eyes closed under thick eyelashes.’
    • ‘To Jude she looked like an angel, with her dark locks encircling her face and her eyes closed and edged in thick lashes.’
    • ‘Then we plunged into thick forest for the final descent to the village.’
    • ‘The rich thick forest cover around the Etna region is an added attraction to the tourists.’
    • ‘The slopes are covered with thick forests while the basins hold orchards, fields and picturesque hamlets.’
    • ‘I turned off the paved road into a dirt track, snaking through the thick forest alongside a bubbly creek.’
    • ‘Far away behind the hill, at the edge of a thick forest, the brown water of a stream flowed rapidly.’
    • ‘His thick eyebrows draw closer to his nose as he smiles with his yellow teeth.’
    • ‘So far the scenery around her had been thick fur trees and dense foliage.’
    • ‘The road twisted and turned up and around the mountains, and soon I was surrounded by thick forest.’
    • ‘Gauls and Germans used the thick forests of northern Europe to hide from Caesar's legions and to ambush them when opportunities arose.’
    • ‘Tall palm trees and thick forests of cactuses give travellers the impression that they are staying in a tropical region.’
    • ‘Even though I have pretty simple hair - thick and straight - I'm nervous about how it's going to look.’
    plentiful, abundant, profuse, luxuriant, bushy, rich, riotous, exuberant
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    1. 2.1thick with Densely filled or covered with.
      ‘the ground was thick with yellow leaves’
      figurative ‘the air was thick with tension’
      • ‘The trees stretched overhead while the ground beneath them was thick with shrubs and grasses.’
      • ‘The air is often thick with fine particulates that coat filters and adhere to fluid spills.’
      • ‘The air was thick with grit and smoke, its acidic taste coating the insides of her mouth.’
      • ‘It is one of very few neighbourhoods where the air is thick with the stench of rotting bin bags.’
      • ‘It was the morning of the house tournament and the air was already thick with anticipation.’
      • ‘However, the air was sometimes so thick with dust that it was almost impossible to breathe.’
      • ‘I ran out of the bedroom and saw the hallway absolutely thick with black smoke.’
      • ‘There was a long silence that hung in the air and made it thick with dread and worry.’
      • ‘Anyway he says the whole region is thick with tens of thousands of troops dug in for the long haul.’
      • ‘The gardens were in full bloom, and the air was thick with the sweet scent of flowers.’
      • ‘Throughout the weeks of Advent the news has been thick with rumours of war.’
      • ‘The air is often thick with the perfume of jasmine and orange blossom.’
      • ‘The air around them was thick with dust and age as they descended a narrow set of spiral stone stairs.’
      • ‘The red rug that covered almost the entire width of the hall was thick with dust.’
      • ‘It reminded me of the days when I attended marketing meetings where the air was thick with such terms.’
      • ‘They lived on the boat for days or weeks at a time, passing by quiet, unnamed islands thick with trees.’
      • ‘The stables were quiet and musty, and the air was thick with the warm smell of horses.’
      • ‘The autumn air is thick with assertions that the Prime Minister's luck is finally running out.’
      • ‘It was light, and birds were singing, but the sky was thick with early-morning clouds.’
      • ‘The alley was so thick with smoke that Carter could hardly see the men making it.’
      • ‘The air was thick with incense smoke from joss sticks and everyone was eating.’
      crowded, filled, packed, teeming, seething, swarming, crawling, crammed, thronged, bursting at the seams, solid, overflowing, choked, jammed, congested
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    2. 2.2 (of the air or atmosphere, or a substance in the air) opaque, dense, or heavy.
      ‘a motorway pile-up in thick fog’
      ‘a thick cloud of smoke’
      • ‘When I walk through it, the thick odor of leather assaults my senses.’
      • ‘The dust storms are so thick that you just can't even see your hand in front of your face.’
      • ‘Sometimes the odor was too pungent and thick for her to stand it for very long.’
      • ‘The forest was filled with dense fog, so thick that I couldn't see more than a few feet in front of me.’
      • ‘The air is thick and heavy, filled with the smell of cigarette smoke and cheep beer.’
      • ‘As well as that nice thick atmosphere, Titan is perpetually covered in clouds.’
      • ‘As she gazed out into the expanse she saw nothing of the thick silver fog, or the dark grey water.’
      • ‘The bottom floor of this mansion was not an inviting place; it was dark and damp; the floors were slightly wet from dripping pipes and the air was thick and heavy.’
      • ‘The next day I'm mulling over the view from my window, watching the fat, grey clouds blossom in the thick air, hoping for a storm to clear the mood.’
      • ‘The air about them was thick enough to taste and tasting was unavoidable.’
      • ‘Television footage showed lava flowing out of the crater while thick clouds of smoke rose upwards and a large fireball burst into the night sky.’
      • ‘The blue-gray smoke of cigars thickened the already thick air.’
      • ‘The latter has a thick atmosphere containing methane, and, it is thought, oceans and lakes containing hydrocarbons.’
      • ‘The room is bathed in a yellow light, made dim by the thick haze of smoke hanging from the ceiling.’
      • ‘The air was thick and murky, and she began to imagine horrible things coming for her.’
      • ‘And then of course we've got Titan, which is a great mystery with this very thick atmosphere.’
      • ‘They may consist of spheres of gas like Jupiter or look like Neptune itself with a core of rock and ice surrounded by a thick atmosphere of hydrogen and helium.’
      • ‘The air was thick and heavy with humidity, serving to dampen their spirits even further.’
      • ‘It was really weird to walk into this room; it was the only place seemingly in the house that didn't have a thick odor of mildew permeating the air.’
      • ‘The city is blanketed today by large, thick clouds of smoke, the sun not able to pierce through at all today.’
      • ‘Because Titan has a thick atmosphere, able to carry sound waves, the moon is a noisy place.’
      • ‘Then, they saw a thick cloud of smoke whirl heavenwards.’
      • ‘The sound of the ax carried through the thick summer air, and I went to the window, shielding my eyes from the red glare of the sunset.’
      • ‘They could see an immense mountain that stretched up into heavy thick clouds.’
      • ‘The air was thick and heavy, it was going to rain soon.’
      • ‘The lowering clouds develop into thick fog, then break into dazzling sunlight.’
      • ‘In these situations, the smell of stale sweat and charcoal smoke permeates the thick air.’
      • ‘Claustrophobia and dread permeate the air like the thick mist around the mansion.’
      • ‘At one point a section of the harbour was cordoned off amid fears of exploding diesel as thick clouds of smoke and fumes billowed across Cartron Bay.’
      • ‘Venus, with a thick atmosphere of carbon dioxide, has a surface temperature of 900 degrees Fahrenheit.’
      • ‘It simply continued, going on towards infinity until finally the air itself was so thick as to be opaque.’
      • ‘Smoke also blew in the direction of Downpatrick, where a thick cloud of smoke also covered the town's Market Street.’
      • ‘Rain, heavy cloud cover and thick fog in the area had prompted Albania's prime minister to cancel his own flight to the conference.’
      • ‘They could no longer see the town but they could see thick clouds of smoke wafting up in the distance.’
      • ‘As the sun slowly rose into the sky, its blinding rays of light were filtered through the thick mists and clouds.’
      • ‘It was raining here for much of the day, and when there wasn't rain, there were thick clouds in the air.’
      • ‘He couldn't see a thing, as the moon hid behind the clouds and thick fog.’
      dense, heavy, opaque, impenetrable, soupy, murky, smoggy
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    3. 2.3 (of a person's head) having a dull pain or heavy feeling, especially as a result of a hangover or illness.
      ‘influenza can cause a thick head’
      ‘Stephen woke late, his head thick and his mouth sour’
      • ‘It was late as I was driving home from the bar, my head thick with beer and a variety of mixed drinks.’
      • ‘For the last two weeks I have had what seems like the flu: aching bones, a thick head, hot and cold shivers and I've gone off my food.’
      • ‘The morning after (now), I have a thick head and my mouth has the usual furry coating.’
  • 3(of a liquid or a semi-liquid substance) relatively firm in consistency; not flowing freely.

    ‘thick mud’
    • ‘It should have the consistency of a thick paste.’
    • ‘My main meal came with well seasoned roasted potatoes, nice firm courgettes in thick tomato sauce, and mildly spiced yam.’
    • ‘Using a small balloon whisk, mix in enough oil to give a thick emulsion.’
    • ‘Once it has the consistency of thick cream, pour into warm sterilised jars.’
    • ‘As he pulled his black sweater off, I could see a steady flow of thick red liquid seeping freely from his left shoulder.’
    • ‘This is a thick substance that is applied in two coats and will create a water barrier on your wall.’
    • ‘The dough should have the consistency of thick mayonnaise.’
    • ‘Mix the clay with a little water until it is the consistency of very thick oatmeal.’
    • ‘The soups were equally good; the potato soup was thick and creamy and was served in a deep bowl with a generous helping of croutons.’
    • ‘Add salt, pepper and cream and reduce to a thick, creamy consistency.’
    • ‘Beat the eggs, sugar and vanilla extract together in a bowl until the mixture is thick and creamy and coats the back of a spoon.’
    • ‘If the soup is too thick, add a little water until the desired consistency is achieved.’
    • ‘Mix all the ingredients to form a thick batter of pouring consistency.’
    • ‘Glycerin is a thick liquid with a sweet taste that is found in fats and oils and is the primary triglyceride found in coconut and olive oil.’
    • ‘In some cases, they have been burnt by leaking mustard gas, which, despite its name, is a thick, viscous liquid.’
    • ‘It was just the right consistency, neither too thick nor too watery, and the eggplant itself was thinly sliced and tender.’
    • ‘Return the strained liquid to the saucepan and reduce to a thick syrup.’
    • ‘She spooned some of the thick liquid into a spoon and handed it to him.’
    • ‘Everything seems so far away, and if feels as though I'm dragging myself through thick liquid.’
    • ‘It is more appetising than it sounds, having the creamy white consistency of thick mayonnaise.’
    • ‘Cook for a few minutes longer until the lamb and zucchini are both tender and the mixture has the consistency of a thick sauce.’
    semi-solid, firm, stiff, stiffened, heavy
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  • 4informal Of low intelligence; stupid.

    ‘he's a bit thick’
    • ‘At times he was stupid, but he was never thick enough to mess with her.’
    • ‘He paused, waiting for the cruel and actually childishly stupid words to sink into my thick brain.’
    • ‘She was gorgeous, and yet she was as thick and unintelligent as a sheep.’
    • ‘I might be being a bit thick here but I don't get what ‘women like me’ means.’
    • ‘I particularly like kids' fiction (mainly because I'm a bit thick and it's easy to read).’
    • ‘At least, it might look that way if you were a bit thick.’
    • ‘Everybody thinks he's a bit thick, but it shows he has got some brains.’
    • ‘Now, excuse me if I'm being a bit thick here but haven't both of these ideas been around for donkeys' years?’
    • ‘Was he plain stupid, thick or did he just want to die?’
    • ‘She is nothing but a stupid, old woman with an extremely thick skull, through which nothing can penetrate.’
    • ‘Up until then I'd just been branded as the thick, stupid farmer's son.’
    • ‘I blinked my eyes blearily and opened my mouth to yawn; I felt thick and slow.’
    • ‘The look of murderous, seething fury on my face must have finally sunk into his thick bovine head, because he turned and left.’
    • ‘I used to think it was me being stupid and thick; the teachers used to call me that a lot.’
    • ‘All I could think was that the author must think I'm too slow and thick to work it out for myself.’
    • ‘He wasn't complaining either; Ashley and Harmony seemed to get along fine, though Mark could tell Harmony thought Ashley was a bit thick.’
    stupid, unintelligent, ignorant, dense, brainless, mindless, foolish, dull-witted, dull, slow-witted, witless, doltish, slow, dunce-like, simple-minded, empty-headed, vacuous, vapid, half-witted, idiotic, moronic, imbecilic
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  • 5(of a voice) not clear or distinct; hoarse or husky.

    ‘Guy's voice was thick with desire’
    ‘a snarling thick voice’
    • ‘Her voice is thick, gritty and powerful, with a big, broad range.’
    • ‘Debbie's voice was thick and nasal and Ashton felt a stab in the stomach, knowing that his wife had been crying.’
    • ‘Though her voice was thick from tears by the end, she held the tears back.’
    • ‘At lunchtime she rang him up, and he answered the phone with a thick voice, as though suffering from a hangover.’
    • ‘He extended his hand and she listened to his voice, thick and rich as honey.’
    • ‘‘Pray for your mother,’ he said in a thick voice, quite unlike the one he had just used.’
    • ‘My voice grew thick and I wasn't surprised to feel the tears fall.’
    • ‘Adam's voice was thick and his pain-filled eyes met Ben's.’
    • ‘Josh could tell that Rob was in tears now - his voice was thick and he was breathing hard.’
    • ‘‘The doctors have given my mother a few days,’ Casey said in a thick, low voice.’
    • ‘Her thick, smoky voice only deepened as she stepped close to me.’
    • ‘His voice was thick, unsteady, as he struggled against the frantic gasps for air that came with bitter, cried tears.’
    • ‘Adrian's voice was thick, as though he wanted to cry and Nicky wasn't sure what to do.’
    • ‘Her voice was getting slightly thick, tears beginning to build in her eyes.’
    • ‘Her voice was thick, but alluring in some indescribable way.’
    • ‘I hoped he would pick up, and not his mother or a sibling, since my voice was thick from crying.’
    • ‘‘This isn't really a good time,’ she hiccuped in a thick voice, roughly smearing the tears from her cheek with the palm of her hand.’
    • ‘‘This is as far as you can go,’ he said in his thick voice, and Dana sighed in defeat.’
    husky, hoarse, throaty, guttural, gravelly, rough, raspy, rasping, croaky, croaking
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    1. 5.1 (of an accent) very marked and difficult to understand.
      ‘a thick French accent’
      • ‘He could always tell a new immigrant, and he could prove it by their weak English and thick accents.’
      • ‘He had a thick Italian accent but I could understand it for the most part.’
      • ‘Plus, my accent was so thick that it was hard for the teachers to understand me.’
      • ‘The actors are especially unhappy about the scene where the asylum seeker meets the English girl's parents and they cannot understand a word he says because of his thick accent.’
      • ‘She speaks with a thick middle European accent, and she is difficult to understand.’
      • ‘It was not hard to recognize Delilah's voice, nor Angel's thick accent as they talked, though it was harder to understand what they said.’
      • ‘A tall, heavy-set man with a thick accent then reached his hand out toward us.’
      • ‘The guy had spoken with a thick accent which made it hard to understand his words.’
      • ‘His co-workers didn't have a problem with that, or his thick accent, he said.’
      • ‘He speaks with a thick south German accent that is difficult to understand, even if you speak German.’
      • ‘Finally, I hear a thick Middle Eastern accent asking me what I'd like.’
      • ‘He had a thick Liverpudlian accent which made it harder to understand and he was going into some detail about what had happened.’
      • ‘The accent was thick, exotic and lilting, and sounded as if it came from the south.’
      • ‘The priest's accent is thick, and he falters in his memorized patter about the church's attempts to overcome poverty and prejudice.’
      • ‘‘Yeah, you left your bag in my cab,’ he says in a thick Brooklyn accent.’
      • ‘It had also taken Katrina a while to grow accustomed to Hazel's thick accent, but after a few weeks of it, Katrina had come to like her voice.’
      • ‘His accent was thick, and she had no idea where it came from.’
      • ‘Thoughtful and articulate with a warming, thick Scouse accent Nick has some pretty candid views about life and rock 'n' roll.’
      • ‘He realized that the girl had a thick accent, but could not place it.’
      • ‘‘I would say we're pop rock,’ she says in a thick accent that gives away her Paisley background.’
      obvious, pronounced, marked, broad, strong, rich, decided, distinct, conspicuous, noticeable, identifiable
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  • 6informal predicative Having a very close, friendly relationship.

    ‘he's very thick with the new master’
    • ‘‘He has a fair chance of success, too, for he seems very thick with Floyd, and it's a good thing to have a friend at headquarters,’ observed the Colonel.’
    • ‘He seems very thick with him.’
    friendly, intimate, familiar, on friendly terms, on good terms, on the best of terms, hand in glove
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noun

the thick
  • The most active or crowded part of something.

    ‘we were in the thick of the battle’
    • ‘Last week's defeat against Pompey dragged the club back into the thick of a relegation battle.’
    • ‘Day after day, they led their men into battle, throwing themselves into the thick of the fighting, each time escaping death only by the skin of their teeth.’
    • ‘It never feels overwhelming and even in the thick of battle it's not distracting.’
    • ‘No distance separates the audience from the actors, who mill on the dance floor in the thick of the crowd.’
    • ‘Roger and James also commanded squadrons of their own, and were in the thick of the fighting during the battle.’
    • ‘When I last spoke to him on March 23, he said he was in the thick of the action.’
    • ‘In large part through British manipulation of local politics, the struggle in Kenya became a kind of civil war, with the Home Guard and African police thrown into the thick of it.’
    • ‘That and their tendency to concede late goals has put Wanderers right back in the thick of the relegation battle, just when things were looking up.’
    • ‘He was always at the front and always in the thick of battle.’
    • ‘He was winning the game easily but, in the thick of battle, made some blunder and lost.’
    • ‘He instructed the soldiers to take the wounded back to safety while he waited in the thick of the gun battle, under constant enemy fire.’
    • ‘Nor could the Yorkshire Post tell its readers that soldiers and regiments from the county were in the thick of the battle.’
    • ‘Mr Khan, who is the Minister of Works, will no doubt be in the thick of things, and will supervise such enterprises as the widening of roads and the repair of landslides.’
    • ‘The turning point was when James himself, in the thick of the battle, was cut down.’
    • ‘Defeat leaves the club in the thick of the relegation battle.’
    • ‘In a few days, or even hours, they could be back in the thick of battle, their crews consumed once more by the thrill of the fear coursing through them as the bullets fly again.’
    • ‘Eventually Guy and Mia end up in the thick of battle in Spain.’
    • ‘The court was shown a video in which the youth, who cannot be named because of his age, was seen throwing stones at police from the thick of a crowd in White Abbey Road at the height of the disturbances.’
    • ‘Kittigrew is in the thick of it as he determines to kill the pirate and end his reign of terror once and for all, but it's safe to say that he has no idea what he's getting himself into.’
    • ‘In 1988, at the age of 24, he was in the thick of the same battles within the Edinburgh Labour Party.’
    midst, centre, hub, middle, core, heart
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adverb

  • In or with deep, dense, or heavy mass.

    ‘bread spread thick with butter’
    • ‘The fog lay thick and cold over the countryside that morning, and inside the barracks it was pitch-black and silent, except for the deep, steady breathing of the gunners.’
    • ‘The snow lay thick upon the graves, and the day was cold and dreary.’
    • ‘It can be spread thick or thin with a tool or craft stick.’
    • ‘When they both exhaled, the smoke hung thick in the air.’
    • ‘Trees grew thick along the farthest side, shading off the entire area.’
    • ‘Of course, if you are a native to Kentucky, it is best when spread thick between two slices of white bread for a quick lunch.’

Phrases

  • a bit thick

    • informal Unfair or unreasonable.

      ‘I thought this was a bit thick and tried to defend myself’
      • ‘He sometimes thought it was a bit thick that the soldiers gobbled up everyone's provisions and his mamma was so poor she had to disguise herself as an old, old lady and sell lilacs at the railway station.’
      • ‘It's a bit thick; it is really!’
      • ‘I have no idea what the total is for the country as a whole, but again, it's a bit thick to be biting the hand that feeds you.’
      • ‘While I have every sympathy with the injured man, it is a bit thick that the Minister for Justice should suggest in this House that every street demonstration is carried out by ‘irresponsible and criminal elements,’ his own words.’
      • ‘I admit that I did think it was a bit thick that he should end up completely out of luck — losing his job, arrested, charged, unemployed and perhaps even unemployable — while life just got better and better for his old adversary.’
      unreasonable, unfair, unjust, unjustified, uncalled for, unwarranted, unnecessary, excessive
      View synonyms
  • give someone (or get) a thick ear

    • informal Punish someone (or be punished) with a blow on the ear or head.

      ‘if I thought you were serious, I would give you a thick ear!’
      • ‘I got over the wall and ran into a small crowd of fans to hide, terrified that the bobby might have seen me and would come and give me a thick ear as he turfed me out.’
      • ‘If your dad didn't have a team of lawyers I'd give you a thick ear.’
      • ‘Pull the other one John: you're still the same man you were the time you gave me a thick ear for shoplifting.’
      • ‘I hope Paula doesn't give me a thick ear next year when I do the coast-to-coast walk again after my past comments.’
      • ‘But if I tried to treat my wife, Margot, the way Caligula treated his, she'd give me a thick ear pretty quick.’
      • ‘The teenager sitting in front of us on the way out was so rude, I was ready to give him a thick ear myself.’
      • ‘They are a culinary retreat that harks back to childhood and a time when the world was a safer place and the Home Secretary wasn't waiting to give you a thick ear for not carrying your national identity card.’
  • thick and fast

    • Rapidly and in great numbers.

      ‘replies are coming in thick and fast’
      • ‘The polls close on May 5 at 10 pm and results will start coming in thick and fast in the early hours of the morning.’
      • ‘The allusions flew thick and fast, with novels and novelists summed up with devastating precision and insight.’
      • ‘The unauthorised biographies flowed thick and fast, film-school recruitment rose and the academics had a field day.’
      • ‘That's when the tears flow thick and fast, and the howling and screaming increase by several decibels.’
      • ‘As he wages his campaign against them, the visual gags and wise-cracks come thick and fast.’
      • ‘Although criticisms of the multi-million pound scheme came thick and fast, the experts were on hand to answer questions.’
      • ‘Pulling out all stops, the actors beat the rain, remained focused, and the dialogue flew thick and fast.’
      • ‘With billions more having been raised this year by UK buyout funds alone, the deals are likely to keep coming thick and fast.’
      • ‘Audiences are larger and younger, classical and contemporary works are pleasing critics and the awards have come thick and fast.’
      • ‘Inevitably at the end of a long season, injuries come thick and fast.’
  • (as) thick as a brick

    • Very stupid.

      ‘her employers must see that she is perceived as being as thick as a brick’
      • ‘Maybe he's as thick as two planks and thinks she is a member of the Labor party.’
      • ‘He may well be as thick as two short planks and show a reckless disregard for the facts, but he's also a grubby opportunist who thrives on the misery of others.’
      • ‘A person can be very good at reeling off facts and figures but can still be as thick as two short planks.’
      • ‘Then again, maybe I'm just as thick as two short planks, which a lot of people think.’
      • ‘She once described herself as ‘thick as two planks’.’
      • ‘This is very surprising because the man has a reputation as being thick as two planks.’
      • ‘It's like meeting a really handsome bloke and finding out he's thick as two short planks when he opens his mouth.’
      • ‘Generally, I like ads that don't assume I'm as thick as two short planks and present themselves in a clever and/or funny way.’
      • ‘Unfortunately, I had observed the boatman was as thick as a plank.’
      • ‘We knew that she was really as thick as two planks.’
      stupid, unintelligent, ignorant, dense, brainless, mindless, foolish, dull-witted, dull, slow-witted, witless, doltish, slow, dunce-like, simple-minded, empty-headed, vacuous, vapid, half-witted, idiotic, moronic, imbecilic
      View synonyms
  • (as) thick as thieves

    • informal (of two or more people) very close or friendly.

      ‘he and Auntie Lou were thick as thieves’
      • ‘In the olden days, Bryan and Justin had been as thick as thieves, closer than brothers, best friends for life.’
      • ‘We were as thick as thieves and would share any secret with one another.’
      • ‘‘By the end, we were all thick as thieves,’ insists McCann.’
      • ‘No wonder she and Claire were the best of friends and thick as thieves.’
      • ‘‘He was seven years older than I, but even then, we were inseparable, thick as thieves,’ she said with a soft laugh.’
      • ‘The younger girl is drawn to Anita's rebellious streak and they soon become thick as thieves.’
      • ‘I was in love with her, and for two years the two of us were thick as thieves.’
      • ‘Besides, I thought you two were as thick as thieves.’
      • ‘They lost interest in each other during the teenage years - by then it was all about rivalry - but now, as mothers themselves, they're as thick as thieves again.’
      • ‘I can't remember how our friendship really got going, but before we knew it we were thick as thieves.’
      friendly, intimate, familiar, on friendly terms, on good terms, on the best of terms, hand in glove
      View synonyms
  • (as) thick as two (short) planks

    • informal Very stupid.

      ‘that school is where you are sent if you are thick as two planks but sporty’
      • ‘Generally, I like ads that don't assume I'm as thick as two short planks and present themselves in a clever and/or funny way.’
      • ‘This is very surprising because the man has a reputation as being thick as two planks.’
      • ‘We knew that she was really as thick as two planks.’
      • ‘Maybe he's as thick as two planks and thinks she is a member of the Labor party.’
      • ‘It's like meeting a really handsome bloke and finding out he's thick as two short planks when he opens his mouth.’
      • ‘She once described herself as ‘thick as two planks’.’
      • ‘Unfortunately, I had observed the boatman was as thick as a plank.’
      • ‘Then again, maybe I'm just as thick as two short planks, which a lot of people think.’
      • ‘A person can be very good at reeling off facts and figures but can still be as thick as two short planks.’
      • ‘He may well be as thick as two short planks and show a reckless disregard for the facts, but he's also a grubby opportunist who thrives on the misery of others.’
      stupid, unintelligent, ignorant, dense, brainless, mindless, foolish, dull-witted, dull, slow-witted, witless, doltish, slow, dunce-like, simple-minded, empty-headed, vacuous, vapid, half-witted, idiotic, moronic, imbecilic
      View synonyms
  • the thick end of

    • informal The greater part of (something)

      ‘he was borrowing the thick end of £750 every week’
      • ‘That is the thick end of a quarter of a billion dollars.’
      • ‘Unfortunately in situations like this the need to blame someone comes in and Alec is getting the thick end of it.’
      • ‘The timing too was crass, since the increase coincided with MPs awarding themselves an annual pay rise equal to the thick end of a year's entire minimum wage.’
  • through thick and thin

    • Under all circumstances, no matter how difficult.

      ‘they stuck together through thick and thin’
      • ‘We were always there for each other through thick and thin; no matter what happened.’
      • ‘Dogs will stand by your side through thick and thin.’
      • ‘As Sarah faces a possible future without the love of her life, she must push her fears aside and stand by James through thick and thin.’
      • ‘I've supported the club through thick and thin but this is all about making money.’
      • ‘My friends have stuck by me through thick and thin, and I think, you know, it's what good friendship's about.’
      • ‘She gets her inspiration from her five great friends (though she has more than that), who have stuck with her through thick and thin.’
      • ‘The great-grandfather has been following the town's rugby league club, through thick and thin, for almost 80 years.’
      • ‘He has done incredible service to the conservative cause through thick and thin, good times and bad, for well over a decade.’
      • ‘I've stuck with the franchise through thick and thin.’
      • ‘They stuck with their story through thick and thin at a time when the U.S. Army was denying that their units were even in that area.’

Origin

Old English thicce, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch dik and German dick.

Pronunciation

thick

/θɪk/