Definition of there will be hell to pay in English:

there will be hell to pay

phrase

informal
  • Serious trouble will occur as a result of a previous or proposed action.

    ‘when I got it wrong, there would be hell to pay’
    • ‘‘You'd better calm down,’ William said harshly, ‘Because if she wakes up, there will be hell to pay.’’
    • ‘It's obvious from the beginning that his secret will come out and there will be hell to pay when it does.’
    • ‘But if they move us again, there will be hell to pay.’
    • ‘These two reasons have one - and only one - undeniable, inevitable consequence: there are natural limits to these excesses, and when these limits are reached, there will be hell to pay!’
    • ‘But when they cross the wrong guy, there will be hell to pay.’
    • ‘And this house better be spotless when we get back, or there will be hell to pay!’
    • ‘But he had better keep his promise or there will be hell to pay.’
    • ‘If the headmaster finds out there will be hell to pay.’
    • ‘If we don't say goodbye to her, there will be hell to pay.’
    • ‘If she gets out of line and doesn't heed their first warning, then they promised there will be hell to pay for strike two!’
    • ‘And if it turns out ultimately that he had nothing to do with anything, no doubt there will be hell to pay.’
    • ‘If you want to change things now, just because you've run into a few difficulties or to renegotiate the deal, then there will be hell to pay.’
    • ‘And if you start fighting over the blankets there will be hell to pay.’
    • ‘But don't you dare try to leave us, or there will be hell to pay.’
    • ‘In time he'll probably succeed in taking most of the party with him, but there will be hell to pay.’
    • ‘My mom will be wondering where I am by now, she might have actually noticed I'm not there, and there will be hell to pay if I miss dinner!’
    • ‘I'm sure there will be hell to pay at some point this week.’
    • ‘One day, you will be caught while coming in, and then there will be hell to pay.’
    • ‘No, we're going to have to trust him, for now - with the caveat that there will be hell to pay if they lie to us.’
    • ‘If work does not commence on the proposed sewerage scheme for the town within one month there will be hell to pay.’