Definition of there in English:

there

Pronunciation /ðɛː//ðə/

adverb

  • 1In, at, or to that place or position:

    ‘we went to Paris and stayed there ten days’
    [with infinitive] ‘at the end of the day we are there to make money’
    [after preposition] ‘I'm not going in there—it's freezing’
    • ‘If they had not seen him, he would probably have stayed there all night and died of hypothermia.’
    • ‘Once there, my niece presented Lisa with a picture of the two of us, and tried to pin us down to another visit.’
    • ‘The first time I saw the episode I just sat there for about ten minutes in complete shock.’
    • ‘They stayed there for 24 hours with no food and only trees as shelter from the heat.’
    • ‘When the mine closed he moved to the Nottingham coalfield and stayed down there.’
    • ‘He spent ten weeks there and emerged with a vicious loathing of the legal system that he nurses still.’
    • ‘We had no idea what they were going to do or how long they intended to keep us there.’
    • ‘He'd already gone over the hill and Dave told me that he had decided to stay over there.’
    • ‘There are heaps of cottages, and in the two years we were there, we stayed in at least four of them.’
    • ‘She went out to Africa to help out a friend for two weeks and then just stayed there for 21 years.’
    • ‘He flew out two days after the race and will stay out there for eight weeks.’
    • ‘Outside, two men asked me what I was doing, and told me not to come near there again.’
    • ‘Firefighters were told by neighbours that the house was empty but two men had been staying there.’
    • ‘We then flew down to San Francisco, staying there for a week or so, with a night away at Yosemite.’
    • ‘What still confuses me though is why the people who protest about it every year insist on staying there.’
    • ‘They found a little straw but the cold chilled their bones and they lay there sleepless and afraid.’
    • ‘On Tuesday the post office said that our application would be there by ten at the latest the next morning.’
    • ‘After the evening meal he would go to the local pub and stay there until it closed.’
    • ‘The lives of several animals, which were staying there overnight, were put at risk.’
    • ‘This is Toronto's oldest hotel and its main claim to fame is that the Beatles once stayed there.’
    1. 1.1 Used when gesturing to indicate the place intended:
      ‘there on the right’
      • ‘She's down there at her desk.’
      • ‘Is that woman over there royalty or something?’
      • ‘I was here the other day for rehearsal and I swear to you there was a camera - there it is.’
      • ‘Go through the narrow gap between the two big trees and there it is before you.’
      • ‘The valet parking and car wash service is just there on the left-hand side.’
      • ‘You could quite easily miss the pub but a quick detour down Main Street and there it is.’
      • ‘Our archives are up there in the attic, but they haven't been sorted into any kind of order.’
      • ‘Yep, there it is, underneath the chair on the other side of the room, frozen in the sudden light; a mouse.’
      • ‘‘It's over there,’ she told him, pointing to it.’
      • ‘And there it is, just across the main street that intersects this one at the center of town.’
      in attendance, attending, here, there, near, nearby, at hand, close at hand, near at hand, adjacent, available, ready
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 At that point (in speech, performance, writing, etc.):
      ‘‘I'm quite—.’ There she stopped’
      • ‘The company had its assets liquidated at the end of 2002, but the story does not end there.’
      • ‘Our speech ended there, for Burginde came bumping up the steps with a bucket of warm water.’
      • ‘‘Benton,’ he said. There he fell silent.’
      • ‘We have no municipality with a large purse behind it - possibly there lies the cause.’
      • ‘For between his crime and his punishment, there lies the really interesting stuff.’
    3. 1.3 In that respect; on that issue:
      ‘I don't agree with you there’
      • ‘There is where they differ.’
      • ‘So writers would be well advised to take separate advice on the legal position there.’
      • ‘I have to take issue with you there.’
      • ‘It was beastly awkward certainly; there I could quite agree with him, and this was the only sympathy he extracted from me.’
      • ‘‘You have me there,’ I replied after some thought, finally giving in.’
  • 2Used in attracting someone's attention or calling attention to someone or something:

    ‘hello there!’
    ‘there goes the phone’
    • ‘Hello there, can we please have your age, occupation, where you are from and where you are now?’
    • ‘Look, there's your new school.’
    • ‘There goes the last bus of the night.’
    • ‘Hello! I say! You there! Can I assist?’
    • ‘Hey there, old timer!’
    • ‘There goes my boss, leaving for the rest of the day, shortly after lunchtime.’
    • ‘Oh, there goes the doorbell, get that, will you, poor person?’
  • 3usually there is/areUsed to indicate the fact or existence of something:

    ‘there's a restaurant round the corner’
    ‘there comes a point where you give up’
    • ‘Petrol prices are very high at present and there have been calls for the government to act to reduce them.’
    • ‘Police said there were no indications that the collision had been caused by icy conditions.’
    • ‘I was quite pleased with my performance, but there are things which need improving.’
    • ‘Adam and Louise had enjoyed a brief fling in the past and there was still an attraction between them.’
    • ‘Sam volunteered to go down to evaluate the situation and see if there was anything we could do.’
    • ‘I'd worked so hard to get my new position, and now there was this sudden gap in my life.’
    • ‘Symptoms such as pain or sickness can indicate that there is a more serious problem inside the body.’
    • ‘In many European countries there are already more mobile phones than there are people.’
    • ‘It is located just off a road, so access is easy, and there are services nearby.’
    • ‘Although his speech was well received there were murmurs of discontent later on in the bar.’
    • ‘A rise in the price of a share simply indicates that there is greater demand for those shares.’
    • ‘Even now the process is not complete and there are outstanding issues to be resolved.’
    • ‘By the end of the weekend, there had been ten fatalities in road accidents in Ireland.’
    • ‘In the park there were various fairground rides and the usual stalls and attractions.’
    • ‘We started our own writing group because there was nowhere to study in this area.’
    • ‘The square attracts many people and there are lots of local people selling their crafts.’
    • ‘As his fame grows and his popularity spreads, there are many traps lying in wait for him.’
    • ‘I would imagine there will be other roles for him to play in public life in future.’
    • ‘At the afternoon showing I attended there was a woman sitting in the row behind me, on her own.’
    • ‘If there are no tickets available, you can still head over to a theatre and join the Wait List line.’
    present, here, there, near, nearby, at hand, by one's side, available
    View synonyms

exclamation

  • 1Used to focus attention on something:

    ‘there, I told you she wouldn't mind!’
    • ‘If we take pleasure in judging then we are more guilty than the judged. If we feel, 'there, that's shown them' we dishonour Christ.’
    • ‘There, I hope you're happy, you finally got it out of me!’
    • ‘There, I've said my piece.’
    • ‘There, I told you the water was fine. It tastes really good.’
    • ‘I don't, you might already have guessed, own a DVD player yet. There, I've said it now.’
  • 2Used to comfort someone:

    ‘there, there, you must take all of this philosophically’
    • ‘‘There, there,’ he said quietly. ‘We'll talk about it. You'll be all right.’’
    • ‘‘There, there,’ I comfort. ‘You'll feel better once the culprit is caught.’’
    • ‘There, there, you poor thing. You're gonna survive this, I promise.’
    • ‘There, there. It will soon be over.’

Phrases

  • been there, done that

    • informal Used to express past experience of or overfamiliarity with something:

      ‘I've been there, done that, got the video and the T-shirt’
      • ‘It sometimes just feels like I've been there, done that!’
      • ‘I can quite confidently say that I've been there, done that, and come back.’
      • ‘I've been there, done that - it's for the younger players.’
      • ‘However, whenever the subject of marriage comes up, Bob says he's been there, done that, laughs, and changes the subject.’
      • ‘Hey, where technology is concerned, we have all been there, done that.’
      • ‘Dawn was a serial dater with a world-weary attitude: been there, done that, got the frog-kissing badge.’
      • ‘But for the savvy traveler who has been there, done that, Tokyo offers hidden charms to rejuvenate the heart and relieve the soles.’
      • ‘He's been there, done that, stood the test of time as an artist, and he's only 23.’
      • ‘I've been there, done that, now I'm over it, at least for now.’
      • ‘Yes, when it comes to writing 50,000 word novels in a month, I've been there, done that, bought the t-shirt.’
  • be there for

    • Be available to provide support or comfort for (someone):

      ‘this person was there for me when I was going through hell’
      • ‘My brother was the person who I knew would always love me, be there for me, support me.’
      • ‘And you know they'll always be there for you, because that's what families do, they support each other, they make that extra effort.’
      • ‘Yet, even heroes need others to support them, to be there for them.’
      • ‘Faye has always been there for me, and she supports me 100 percent.’
      • ‘Just because you won't be a girlfriend doesn't mean you won't support him, and be there for him at his time of need.’
      • ‘Ellen's dad Harry said: ‘We'd like to thank everyone who has been there for us and has given us their support, especially the staff at the hospital and all of Ellen's friends.’’
      • ‘I've been there for you, I'm supporting you and Maggie, and what do I get?’
      • ‘Some of the friends she turned to for support turned out not to be there for her.’
      • ‘She has gone to hell and back but mum has always been there for us.’
      • ‘All you have to do is be there for him if he needs support with his decisions.’
  • have been there before

    • informal Know all about a situation from experience:

      ‘here are some helpful tips from mothers who've been there before’
      • ‘Thankfully, they can count on the support of others who have been there before.’
      • ‘‘There are some nerves and that's really a case of their not having been there before and they're not quite sure of what to expect,’ he said.’
      • ‘Kerry have the experience and they have been there before so there's probably more pressure on them as they'll be favourites.’
      • ‘Is coping easier because he has been there before?’
      • ‘It's the first time I've been in a semi-final, very few of us have been there before, and we are all determined to make the most of the opportunity.’
      • ‘But he has been there before, and is well aware of the fleeting nature of public adulation.’
      • ‘It's hard to get the opportunity at a midpoint in your career if you haven't had the experience - senior managers look for people who have been there before.’
      • ‘We have been there before in religious and sporting crises and have triumphed by the simple retention of faith and belief.’
      • ‘I have been there before, Bree, I know how to deal with the pain, he can't hurt me anymore, so shut up and let me take care of this!’
      • ‘There are older players who have been there before and they will want to show they can still handle top soccer.’
  • here and there

    • In various places:

      ‘small bushes scattered here and there’
      • ‘All you need is a general anaesthetic and you get cut up and pumped up with silicone here and there.’
      • ‘Success in the initial days was mainly as a comedian, along with a few songs here and there.’
      • ‘The lake was as calm as a mirror with dozens of posts standing above the surface here and there.’
      • ‘Many individuals have put a family tree together and have come across a gap here and there.’
      • ‘Well, I laughed here and there, and I kind of could see where it was trying to go.’
      • ‘People wiped it to remove a speck of dirt here and there before covering it back with the cloth.’
      • ‘I think that we're still shy of saying it and, okay, bad experiences can still be had here and there.’
      • ‘It has an eccentric layout, with odd corners, passageways and staircases here and there.’
      • ‘I've also added a few widgets here and there but I'll let you find them yourselves.’
      • ‘The sky is clear and blue, with a few odd clouds scattered here and there for effect.’
      in various places, in different places, hither and thither, at random
      from place to place, around, about, to and fro, hither and thither, back and forth, in all directions, from pillar to post
      View synonyms
  • so there

    • informal Used to express one's defiance:

      ‘you can't share, so there!’
      • ‘I'm going fishing today, so there!’
      • ‘I'm not embarrassed, and I'm certainly not letting you get me flustered. So there!’
      • ‘It's as though I feel I have to earn it - well I can honestly say I have - so there!’
      • ‘I've never owned a car, nor have I driven one for over six years. So there!’
      • ‘I'm not talking to her, so there!’
  • there and then

    • Immediately:

      ‘he agreed to it there and then’
      • ‘Most radically, you take the goods away with you, right there and then.’
      • ‘It was agreed there and then that the flag would be buried where they stood.’
      • ‘You will get the chance to have your say and hopefully have your questions answered there and then.’
      • ‘He realises very quickly where he is better off and finishes the relationship there and then.’
      • ‘Susie and I sat in the Movie Cafe on Friday and I promised there and then that I'd make some good progress.’
      • ‘But some things can't be tackled there and then and need to be put on a list.’
      • ‘Of course, if Kingston had been bothered to speak to us when we called, we could have set the record straight there and then.’
      • ‘He went for a course of shiatsu - and was so impressed with the results he signed up to train as a shiatsu healer there and then.’
      • ‘In fact, I should probably have just cancelled the interview there and then.’
      • ‘I instantly contacted the gallery: I wanted to buy it there and then, but it had been sold.’
      immediately, at once, straight away, right away, instantaneously, suddenly, abruptly, all of a sudden, on the instant, at a stroke, forthwith, then and there, there and then, here and now, this/that, that very minute, this very minute, that instant, this instant
      View synonyms
  • there goes ——

    • Used to express the destruction or failure of something:

      ‘there goes my career’
      • ‘Because if everything that you have is invested in just one stock and something happens to that one stock, there goes your money.’
      • ‘If there's one miss, then there goes the gold medal.’
      • ‘Well I suppose there goes my dreams of becoming a tech geek at a big company.’
      • ‘Damn, there goes my place in the company netball team.’
      • ‘And he says that I'm an alcoholic womaniser who would do anything for money - there goes my reputation.’
      • ‘There goes my film career right out the window.’
      • ‘People then were looking at the derelict site and saying ‘Well, there goes our future.’’
      • ‘There goes my plans for dinner and a movie.’
      • ‘If we produce hydrogen from natural gas, there goes our energy independence.’
      • ‘‘I said to myself ‘I've hit the ball right in the creek and there goes the championship’.’’
  • there it is

    • That is the situation:

      ‘pretty ridiculous, I know, but there it is’
      • ‘She is a sort of family friend, and I'm sorry to be so critical of her, but there it is.’
      • ‘But there it is - I cannot resist buying linen for me or my friends, male and female.’
      • ‘I've never quite understood how all this adds up in the economy as a whole, but there it is.’
      • ‘An unwilling representative is not a particularly useful one - so there it is.’
      • ‘He looked like he was going to cry, and I felt bad for him, but there it is… so, I got back into the car, and I left.’
      • ‘As regular readers will know, for the life of me I cannot understand why party politics exist in local education, but there it is.’
      • ‘It is all very odd, but there it is: they have style; I, sadly, do not.’
      • ‘But there it is: some of those professing a faith grounded in compassion and charity really do hate each other.’
      • ‘Anyway, there it is: the imperative of growth, consumption and the exploitation of resources.’
      • ‘These will no doubt change with the wind, but there it is.’
  • there or thereabouts

    • 1In or very near a particular place or position.

      • ‘If he does make it, he will be there or thereabouts, but nowhere near his peak.’
      • ‘Having been there or thereabouts, I'd love to think I could now establish myself.’
      • ‘We're near the top and we have to stay there or thereabouts.’
      • ‘There were only two points in it and I knew that if we got two scores we would be there or thereabouts.’
      • ‘I was there or thereabouts for a few years, and there's not much between being in an international squad and getting a cap.’
      1. 1.1Approximately:
        ‘forty years, there or thereabouts, had elapsed’
        • ‘It's 90 days there or thereabouts to the start of the Premiership.’
        • ‘I would say about 10 per cent, there or thereabouts.’
        • ‘Forty five minutes (there or thereabouts) is the perfect length for an album!’
  • there you are (or go)

    • 1informal This is what you wanted:

      ‘there you are—that'll be £3.80 please’
      • ‘They took it out, looked at it, had a bit of a chuckle and said there you go.’
      • ‘One day my husband came home with a computer and said there you go - now start!’
      • ‘And there you go, one round of drinks for nothing.’
      • ‘So there you go, Betty, a little inside look at the bureau.’
      • ‘Anyhow I promised Charlie I would give her a name check on the blog so (hoping I got the correct spelling) there you go, Charlie!’
      • ‘‘All right, there you go,’ Swingley says - to the dogs, not me.’
    • 2informal Used to express confirmation, triumph, or resignation:

      ‘there you are! I told you the problem was a political one’
      ‘sometimes it is embarrassing, but there you go’
      • ‘I've no idea how I came to this conclusion, but there you go.’
      • ‘I still don't understand how ‘Highest Selling’ can possibly be an actual category for an award, or why the result would come as a surprise to anyone who keeps an eye on sales, but there you go.’
      • ‘So there you go - decades waiting to see one of my favourite artists, and I came away thinking I'd sooner hear more unfamiliar stuff and not so many old favourites.’
      • ‘He added: ‘Normally if the first game is away, your last is at home but we're away both times, which is a bit strange, but there you go.’’
      • ‘He joked: ‘I admit it is unusual for politicians to take part in a feature film, but there you go.’’
      • ‘This may sound pathetic, but it is, so there you go.’
      • ‘So there you go, I had a family crisis towards the end of the weekend, but it doesn't feel that way now.’
      • ‘‘Well, there you go then,’ he announced, proudly, ‘I told you so.’’
      • ‘I was a little unfortunate and I might have finished a couple of shots better than I did, but there you go.’
      • ‘Actually I find them all annoying, so there you go.’
  • there you go again

    • Used to criticize someone for behaving in a way that is typical of them.

      • ‘Well there you go again mom jumping to conclusions, He happens to be a really good friend of mine.’
      • ‘Yeah I know - 80 percent of you have seen your own standard of living tumble the last couple of decades, but there you go again; Whine, whine, whine.’
      • ‘I know, you're thinking, there you go again with the gross exaggeration.’
      • ‘I almost though we could have a truce but there you go again!’
      • ‘Jeez, there you go again Nicole with your giddy schoolgirl thoughts!!’
  • there you have it

    • Used to draw attention to a fact or to emphasize the simplicity of a process or action:

      ‘simply turn the handle three times and there you have it’
      • ‘Undertake care instructions 1, 2 and 3, and there you have it, a perfect crop of carrots.’
      • ‘A shiny suit maybe, a hair and dental makeover - and not forgetting a new street-cred name… and there you have it.’
      • ‘Add to that a wrap dress, a dab of her cheek stick and a squirt of her signature perfume, and there you have it: glamour in a nutshell.’
      • ‘Click OK, give a filename, and there you have it - a perfectly usable, portable copy of your magnum opus.’
      • ‘Turn on your hi-fi and a hose or a sprinkler in the backyard and there you have it - a Caribbean Wet Féte!’
      • ‘Stir the dough over fire, add crushed pistachios and almonds, form into a circle or a square and there you have it.’

Origin

Old English thǣr, thēr of Germanic origin; related to Dutch daar and German da, also to that and the.

Pronunciation

there

/ðɛː//ðə/