Definition of therapy in English:

therapy

noun

  • 1[mass noun] Treatment intended to relieve or heal a disorder.

    ‘a course of antibiotic therapy’
    [count noun] ‘cancer therapies’
    • ‘The subject of alternative therapies for cancer stirs quite a debate within the field of oncology.’
    • ‘New targeted therapies are largely responsible for the increased survival rates.’
    • ‘They may have tried over-the-counter preparations, dietary exclusions, or alternative therapies.’
    • ‘Complementary therapies such as osteopathy and acupuncture are popular.’
    • ‘Hormone therapy will bring about physical and perhaps psychogenic changes.’
    • ‘The holistic therapies might lead medicine back towards the holism of the ancient systems.’
    • ‘Many patients receiving these new therapies respond rapidly to them and get a lot of clinical benefit.’
    • ‘Prices have gone up a bit, but, as with all holistic therapies, the more you pay the more it's worth.’
    • ‘Many of the standard radiation and drug therapies now used to treat cancers can have serious side effects.’
    • ‘Combining two or more of these therapies has a cumulative effect on pain reduction.’
    • ‘Many health and fitness salons provide hair salons, beauty treatments and massage therapies.’
    • ‘Gene therapies could allow new approaches, or help existing treatments work better.’
    • ‘Genomics is promoting a tremendous interest in novel therapies of which gene therapies will be only a minority.’
    • ‘Whether in the guise of new drugs or new therapies, technology is costly.’
    • ‘Biological therapies help the body's immune system to attack cancer cells.’
    • ‘The preferable option would be for these therapies to be administered in the patient's home or workplace.’
    • ‘However, drug therapies that target the dopamine system may be on the horizon.’
    • ‘Combination therapies usually contain drugs from two of these classes.’
    • ‘He adds that in the future this gene may also be used as a specific target for cancer therapies.’
    • ‘He believes more and more people are turning to homeopathy, herbal medicine, and other therapies.’
    • ‘These medical therapies are aimed at reducing the viral load and hence induce early remission.’
    treatment, remedy, cure, remedial treatment, method of healing
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1The treatment of mental or psychological disorders by psychological means.
      ‘he is currently in therapy’
      [as modifier] ‘therapy sessions’
      • ‘If you couldn't hold out the hope of being able to deal with the problem, there would be no point in therapy at all.’
      • ‘I may end up in therapy for months and the potential for embarrassment is endless.’
      • ‘Relate offers both a diploma and a Masters in couples therapy, as well as a diploma in psychosexual therapy.’
      • ‘Low sexual desire is rapidly becoming the most common issue treated in psychosexual therapy.’
      • ‘Mental training can, like therapy, take time to produce the desired effects.’
      • ‘I made the point that psychological research and therapy have two extremely different goals.’
      • ‘He is also having weekly therapy sessions with a clinical psychiatrist to keep him sane.’
      • ‘While attending the therapy sessions he noted a slight improvement in his condition.’
      • ‘Two years ago she told a magazine that her childhood scars drove her to seek therapy.’
      • ‘He was a devotee of therapy and continued to see his psychoanalyst in the home.’
      • ‘Judy was in therapy for months, before stopping it entirely back in January.’
      • ‘As interested as you no doubt are in my childhood days, this is not a public therapy session.’
      • ‘All three films feel like confessionals, or more accurately therapy sessions.’
      • ‘There is also psychotherapy which uses the birth chart as an aid to the therapy process.’
      • ‘The evidence concerns a kind of psychological therapy known as debriefing.’
      • ‘I've been thinking about therapy so now the possibility or seeing my old psychologist looms.’
      • ‘You know it was bad enough in therapy having to relive my childhood but this is so much worse.’
      • ‘One visit to the local psychotherapist later it's his parents that need the therapy not him.’
      • ‘Arthur sounds like someone who has been in therapy; he sounds, in fact, like my dad.’
      • ‘She has confessed she has been in therapy because she thinks she's a bad mother.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: from modern Latin therapia, from Greek therapeia healing, from therapeuein minister to, treat medically.

Pronunciation:

therapy

/ˈθɛrəpi/