Definition of tetanic in English:

tetanic

adjective

  • Relating to or characteristic of tetanus, especially in connection with tonic muscle spasm.

    • ‘Clearly, tetanic stimulation of the quadriceps muscle is not feasible in unanesthetized human subjects.’
    • ‘The diaphragm muscle specimens showed complete tetanic contractions in response to a train of electrical pulses at room temperature (23 [degrees] C).’
    • ‘Tetanus infection can cause production of a neurotoxin, leading to tetanic muscle contractions.’
    • ‘Three days after being given intravenous zoledronic acid, he had tetanic spasms and paraesthesia.’
    • ‘Yet, previously only an insignificant change in intensity distribution was found in some studies on frog muscle between relaxation and tetanic contraction and during contraction at low versus high temperature.’
    • ‘The ratio of peak twitch force to peak tetanic force could then be calculated.’
    • ‘Ryanodine has complex effects on muscle contractile activity; it was reported to depress twitch and tetanic tension, and to induce a slowly developing contracture.’
    • ‘At the first sign of overdosage, such as tetanic contractions or fetal distress, Pitocin should be discontinued, and the patient treated with symptomatic and support therapy.’
    • ‘We performed the procedure using electrical rather than high potassium stimulation, because it yields a closer representation of the physiological condition found during tetanic stimulation.’
    • ‘Moreover, angiotensin II infusion has been shown to increase tetanic tension in rat hind-limb preparations.’
    • ‘To verify that the stimulation by itself was insufficient to elicit this type of response, we tested two different protocols, low-frequency and tetanic high-frequency stimulations.’
    • ‘However, the changes in mouse muscle seem to be complete within 100-120 ms, i.e., no later than the achievement of the tetanic plateau.’
    • ‘Paitoon, a mango farmer, was admitted to Manorom Christian Hospital with tetanic convulsions.’
    • ‘Figs. 11 and 12 compare the time courses of changes of intensities and spacings of representative reflections with that of tension in a single tetanic contraction-relaxation cycle.’
    • ‘The abscissa indicates the time after the start of tetanic stimulation.’

Origin

Early 18th century: via Latin from Greek tetanikos, from tetanos (see tetanus).

Pronunciation:

tetanic

/tɪˈtanɪk/