Main definitions of tender in English

: tender1tender2tender3

tender1

adjective

  • 1Showing gentleness, kindness, and affection.

    ‘he was being so kind and tender’
    ‘she covered his face with tender kisses’
    • ‘In many countries men show very tender affection for one another frequently and openly.’
    • ‘A mom's tender affection, her smiles and presence touches every heart.’
    • ‘It was a soft, sweet, tender kiss.’
    • ‘They have a real and tender affection for her.’
    • ‘He truly appreciated her tender love with deep affection.’
    • ‘His touch was tender and gentle.’
    • ‘Back at Richard's house, he was oddly tender and gentle towards me.’
    • ‘His eyes were glossy and filled with tender affection.’
    • ‘This tender little show is enough to make even the most cynical of hearts swell.’
    • ‘He took my hand and laid a gentle, tender kiss on it.’
    • ‘I want nights full of tender touches and gentle caresses.’
    • ‘His kisses were tender and gentle.’
    • ‘I regret that I was not more tender or affectionate with Edward during the last few weeks of his life.’
    • ‘His voice as tender and gentle as his kiss.’
    • ‘She kisses him with tender pity.’
    • ‘I was just misinterpreting a tender display of affection.’
    • ‘The warm embrace and the warm tender kisses make me feel as though I am floating.’
    • ‘It's a gentle, tender moment between man and wife.’
    • ‘He was stroking my hair with a gentle, tender hand.’
    • ‘She tried to keep her tender kindness hidden in order to appear strong and in control.’
    caring, kind, kindly, kind-hearted, soft-hearted, tender-hearted, compassionate, sympathetic, warm, warm-hearted, feeling, fatherly, motherly, maternal, gentle, mild, benevolent, generous, giving, humane
    affectionate, fond, loving, emotional, warm, gentle, soft
    romantic, sentimental, emotional, emotive, touching, moving, poignant, evocative
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1tender ofarchaic Solicitous of.
      ‘be tender of a lady's reputation’
      • ‘I was obliged to lead him about, tender him, and help him.’
  • 2(of food) easy to cut or chew; not tough.

    ‘tender green beans’
    • ‘The meat has been carefully selected and cooked to be perfectly tender.’
    • ‘Pour the syrup over the figs and place them in the oven until they are tender and sticky.’
    • ‘Venison steaks are more tender than beef, with a leaner, cleaner flavour.’
    • ‘There is a range of juicy, tender steaks and chicken dishes.’
    • ‘Gently boil for another five minutes, until the carrots are tender.’
    • ‘Her plate was heaped with several good, thick slices of tasty, tender pork.’
    • ‘I would seal them in hot fat, wrap each bird in fatty bacon or pancetta and roast till tender.’
    • ‘The stew was filled with tender meat, beans, barley and carrots.’
    • ‘There are fresh fruit juices and tender coconut.’
    • ‘Potato is used as a thickener or for biscuits and cakes where a tender texture is required’
    • ‘The beef steaks are tender and juicy.’
    • ‘Continue simmering until the eggplant skin is tender, about 15 more minutes.’
    • ‘The lamb was tender without being delicate.’
    • ‘In the first container she placed 1 pound of asparagus that she trimmed and steamed until tender and allowed to cool.’
    • ‘The quails were tender, with just crispy enough skin.’
    • ‘The chicken wraps were full of tender, pleasantly sticky marinated meat.’
    • ‘Fry over a medium heat until the potatoes are tender and golden brown.’
    • ‘The duck livers with orange sauce were tender and tasty.’
    • ‘The calamari in tomato sauce was tender and flavourful.’
    • ‘Watch carefully so the turkey is done but still moist and tender.’
    easily chewed, not tough, chewable, soft, edible, eatable
    View synonyms
  • 3(of a part of the body) sensitive to pain.

    ‘the pale, tender skin of her forearm’
    • ‘There is atrophy of the muscles in the shoulder, with more than two sensitive tender points.’
    • ‘The rope gnawed at the tender skin of her wrists.’
    • ‘His knuckles were chapped and felt rough against the tender skin on his face.’
    • ‘She gasped in pain and rubbed the tender, already bruised flesh.’
    • ‘She felt a needle prick her tender skin.’
    • ‘This fabulous range of organic products helps babies with sleep and tender skin problems.’
    • ‘Pain is felt only after exercise, and the affected area is not tender to the touch, discolored or swollen.’
    • ‘The lesions can be tender to the touch’
    • ‘Having an appliance fitted doesn't hurt, but your teeth usually feel tender for a few days after it is fitted or adjusted.’
    • ‘The shoulder was so painful for a while that I didn't really notice my hand until I came off and realised it was bit tender.’
    • ‘The area over the appendix will be very tender.’
    • ‘There's nothing worse than pulling a hard pencil eyeliner across the tender skin of the eyelid.’
    • ‘Strong sunshine harms the tender skin around the eye.’
    • ‘This pack pulled at her shoulders, rubbing the tender skin under her arms.’
    • ‘The bandage was delicately applied to the tender joint, where a bruise was starting to develop.’
    • ‘The main symptoms of fibromyalgia are pains, tender areas, and tiredness.’
    • ‘She got up, raising her tender body onto her left elbow.’
    • ‘A slight splinter can chafe the skin until it is tender and sore.’
    • ‘Sensitive, tender or sore breasts are commonly one of the first signs of pregnancy.’
    • ‘She winced in pain as her sheets slid against her tender skin.’
    sore, painful, sensitive, inflamed, raw, red, chafed
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1 (of a plant) easily injured by severe weather and therefore needing protection.
      ‘pelargoniums are colourful but tender plants’
      • ‘If frost is predicted, fling some fleece over fruit trees and more tender shrubs.’
      • ‘Most fleshy plants and tender, newer plant growth will root very easily.’
      • ‘When the ground is warmed to 60 degrees, it's time to plant out tender seedlings.’
      • ‘Since tuberous begonias are tender succulents, they need to be hung in shady or partial-shady locations.’
      • ‘Don't be tempted by tender bedding plants in garden centres yet.’
      • ‘New grass is tender and will not respond well to foot traffic until it matures and thickens.’
      • ‘Slightly tender plants need as much wind protection as possible.’
      • ‘This film protects tender plants and trees from frost damage.’
      • ‘Bring tender plants indoors for the winter.’
      • ‘Set out tender bedding plants such as petunias and marigolds after the last frost of spring.’
      • ‘It is a tender plant with large double flowers that appear all summer.’
      • ‘Blooms are best in full sun, but these tender plants can take a half-day of sun.’
      • ‘All tender plants need to be kept in a frost-free greenhouse or in a cool place indoors.’
      • ‘Eaves provide frost protection for tender plants underneath.’
      • ‘This is a time when tender new garden plants are at risk.’
      • ‘Watch the weather forecast and cover up those frost tender plants at night.’
      • ‘Before frost arrives, bring tender herbs indoors to the window or light garden you've prepared.’
      • ‘We had extremely hot weather early, and some of the tender plants suffered from the intense heat.’
      • ‘The opportunity to grow more tender, more exotic plants is tempting.’
      • ‘Protect tender plants after the ground freezes with a layer of loose mulch.’
      delicate, easily damaged, fragile, breakable, frail
      View synonyms
    2. 3.2 Requiring tact or careful handling.
      ‘the issue of conscription was a particularly tender one’
      • ‘It was already a very tender and awkward situation.’
      difficult, delicate, tricky, awkward, problematic, troublesome, ticklish
      View synonyms
  • 4Young, inexperienced, or vulnerable.

    ‘he started sailing at the tender age of ten’
    • ‘She has had a major change in her life at the tender age of 19.’
    • ‘She started producing an early version of her zine at the tender age of 10.’
    • ‘The fact that a violinist of such tender years can make this music sound so fresh is a considerable accomplishment.’
    • ‘He began his acting career at the tender age of ten.’
    • ‘This young man, at the tender age of 24 years, was the victim of a tragic accident.’
    • ‘She made her stage debut at the tender age of four.’
    • ‘The teen singer and actress has been in showbusiness since the tender age of nine.’
    • ‘The plan was to look older than my tender years.’
    • ‘The couple met at the tender age of 14.’
    • ‘He has collected a wealth of happy memories since he joined the team at the tender age of 15.’
    • ‘At the tender age of 25, she is quickly becoming an authority on urban fashion.’
    • ‘They play with a conviction and authenticity far beyond their tender years.’
    • ‘At the tender age of 12 they already have shelves full of trophies.’
    • ‘At the tender age of 18, he will be the youngest contestant ever.’
    • ‘He switched to electric bass, an instrument he began playing at the tender age of nine.’
    • ‘Her life was cut short at the tender age of 21.’
    • ‘At the tender age of 25, he has 20 years experience under his belt.’
    • ‘She had written with flair and maturity, and had a sensitivity way beyond her tender years.’
    • ‘At the tender age of 16 I started going out with my first real girlfriend.’
    • ‘At the tender age of 16 he became the youngest player in the modern game to play at the tournament.’
    young, youthful
    View synonyms
  • 5Nautical
    (of a ship) leaning or readily inclined to roll in response to the wind.

    • ‘Initially the 35.5 is quite tender and quick to heel, so it is important not to overpower the boat with large headsails.’
    • ‘I would expect the boat to be a bit on the tender side when the wind picks up.’

Phrases

  • tender mercies

    • Used ironically to refer to attention or treatment not in the best interests of its recipients.

      ‘they abandoned their children to the tender mercies of the social services’
      • ‘My dad and I left him to the tender mercies of his mother and went inside.’
      • ‘He had recently committed himself to the tender mercies of a psychiatrist.’
      • ‘Unlike filmstars, crime victims have not submitted themselves to the tender mercies of the press and forfeited any right to privacy.’
      • ‘You will be handed over to the tender mercies of the nurse.’
      • ‘We have no national dance company and rely on the tender mercies of people like her to keep our folk dances alive.’
      • ‘The children were given over to the tender mercies of the church and its care homes for orphans.’
      • ‘They were now facing a very uncertain future, consigned to the tender mercies of a new and hostile regime.’
      • ‘The children will now be entrusted to the tender mercies of their distant cousin.’
      • ‘They would leave their wives to the tender mercies of the labour ward while they travelled abroad to watch football.’
      • ‘She threw herself on the tender mercies of the world's web community.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French tendre, from Latin tener ‘tender, delicate’.

Pronunciation

tender

/ˈtɛndə/

Main definitions of tender in English

: tender1tender2tender3

tender2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Offer or present (something) formally.

    ‘he tendered his resignation as leader’
    • ‘He concluded his presentation to the members by informing them he was tendering his notice to retire from his position.’
    • ‘Nine board members had tendered their resignations at a meeting.’
    • ‘We tender condolences on their great loss.’
    • ‘They tendered their resignations in protest against the firing of their 15 colleagues.’
    • ‘A document was tendered and received in evidence.’
    • ‘He cleared his desk after tendering his resignation one week ago.’
    • ‘He was about to embark on a career break and had actually tendered his resignation.’
    • ‘He never tendered a formal resignation, although the organization has already hired a replacement.’
    • ‘Two high-profile directors of the company tendered their resignations recently.’
    • ‘To his wife, his daughters, and all his extended family, we tender our sincere sympathy.’
    • ‘At trial, there was no objection to the breathalyzer results being tendered as evidence.’
    • ‘Although she had provided the diploma, it was not tendered in evidence.’
    • ‘The football manager left the pitch and immediately tendered his resignation.’
    • ‘He formally tendered his resignation to the president the following day.’
    • ‘A bag with 107 cocaine capsules was tendered in evidence and marked.’
    • ‘The tape was tendered in evidence during proceedings.’
    • ‘He tendered his resignation to the committee and we all refused it.’
    • ‘The issue in this case is the adequacy of the evidence tendered by the plaintiff.’
    • ‘He formally tendered his resignation on reaching the age of 75.’
    • ‘The four employees concerned had tendered their resignations.’
    offer, proffer, present, put forward, propose, suggest, advance, submit, set before someone, extend, give, render
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Offer (money) as payment.
      ‘she tendered her fare’
      • ‘Many businesses around the town are sitting targets for tendering counterfeit Euro notes that are currently circulating in large quantities.’
      • ‘A banker's draft had been tendered and refused.’
    2. 1.2no object Make a formal written offer to carry out work, supply goods, or buy land, shares, or another asset for a stated fixed price.
      ‘firms of interior decorators have been tendering for the work’
      • ‘We did prevent British companies from tendering for contracts and supplies.’
      • ‘Tendering for the project has been whittled down to two consortia.’
      • ‘Companies tendering for business can be tempted to agree jointly not to go in under a certain price.’
      • ‘There has been a flood of interest by private businesses in tendering for public sector contracts.’
      • ‘The new policy sets out clear procedures for religious groups to follow in tendering for land designated for purposes of worshipping.’
      • ‘About 19 agencies are believed to have expressed an interest in tendering for the account.’
      • ‘Very few contracts have been won by foreign companies and few of these firms have been successful in tendering for subsequent road projects.’
      • ‘The new plans are guidelines which will be given to the four companies tendering for the franchise.’
      • ‘The company is now tendering for a lucrative contract from one of Hong Kong's biggest bus companies.’
      • ‘He is part of a consortium tendering for a licence in Scotland.’
      • ‘We would expect something like 6 companies to be tendering for a project of this size.’
      • ‘The organisation advises on how to consider tendering for work from foreign public bodies.’
      • ‘All those interested in tendering for the transport plan may attend a presentation on requirements.’
      • ‘They reached an agreement between each other not to compete in tendering for contracts.’
      • ‘The company is tendering for a number of large government contracts.’
      • ‘The company was tendering for work worth £430m.’
      • ‘This is a trade publication for those interested in tendering for government work.’
      • ‘We have begun tendering for archaeological and site investigation and other works.’
      • ‘In October, at least 11 companies or consortiums expressed interest in tendering for the 40-hectare project.’
      • ‘He acted as an agent for foreign firms tendering for China's major power construction projects.’
      bid, put in a bid, quote, give an estimate, propose a price
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3 Formally offer (a stated fixed price) for carrying out work, supplying goods, etc.
      ‘what price should we tender for a contract?’
      • ‘The city entered into a partnership with the company, despite the fact that it tendered the lowest bid.’
      • ‘The company tendered a €58 million price three years ago, but inflation since then could increase the value of the project.’
      • ‘The Danish company tendered the lowest price.’
    4. 1.4tender something out Seek offers to carry out work at a stated fixed price.
      ‘I don't even know why they tendered it out’
      • ‘He ran one of two butcher's stalls on the market until it was tendered out to another trader.’
      • ‘Smaller schemes will be tendered out directly to local companies.’
      • ‘We have to tender the project out and need contract specifications.’
      • ‘The contract was tendered out and they won the deal against industry competition.’
      • ‘These shop-fronts would be tendered out to the existing agencies.’

noun

  • An offer to carry out work, supply goods, or buy land, shares, or another asset at a stated fixed price.

    ‘we invited tenders for up to three more frigates’
    mass noun ‘being government land, it was sold by tender’
    as modifier ‘a minimum tender price’
    • ‘What is needed instead is for the Government to take a lead, by immediately calling for tenders to install solar water heating in all Government buildings where it is cost-effective to do so.’
    • ‘The Motor Sports Association has invited tenders from promoters interested in hosting the prestigious race from next season.’
    • ‘The government offered 15 petrol filling stations for sale by tender.’
    • ‘He suggested an alternative would be to inform residents of the actual price of the asphalt after tenders for the project close later this spring.’
    • ‘The prices and the range of tenders received and the successful tenderer are usually published.’
    • ‘The city will invite tenders for six of the facilities this Friday.’
    • ‘The commission has extended the deadline for the submission of tenders by one month.’
    • ‘It is time to invite tenders from prospective builders.’
    • ‘The hospitals will be sold through ordinary tenders.’
    • ‘The tender for the land swap was only joined by four companies.’
    • ‘The corporation sought tenders for the land.’
    • ‘They invited tenders for the distribution of fertiliser throughout the country.’
    • ‘Tenders will be invited for private companies to supply the tracking devices.’
    • ‘Telecommunication operators in Bulgaria have been rescued from the obligation to hold public procurement tenders to purchase new equipment.’
    • ‘They could not invite tenders as the project was challenged in court.’
    • ‘The tenders were evaluated on price, experience of the tenderer, methodology, quality and technical merit.’
    • ‘The civic body invited short-term tenders for the work.’
    • ‘Many construction companies are lining up to offer tenders for India's infrastructure projects.’
    • ‘The Department of Defence has invited tenders to supply the air force with six new military helicopters.’
    • ‘The municipality recently invited tenders for the purchase of the land, because they could not afford to develop it.’
    bid, offer, quotation, quote, estimate, estimated price, price
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • put something out to tender

    • Seek offers to carry out work or supply goods at a stated fixed price.

      ‘conventional health and social services could be put out to tender’
      • ‘The council broke the law in appointing consultants without putting the contract out to tender.’
      • ‘The contract for construction of the school was put out to tender, in accordance with the tendering procedures.’
      • ‘Plans to put school bus contracts out to tender have angered bus drivers, who claim it will compromise safety.’
      • ‘The buildings were put out to tender last November.’
      • ‘The department put a contract out to tender for the supply of newspapers.’
      • ‘Now that the rates have been officially announced, the contract will be put out to tender to private enterprise.’
      • ‘The usual process of putting contracts out to tender has been brushed aside.’
      • ‘They have held the contract for the last 20 years, repeatedly winning when it is put out to tender every three or four years.’
      • ‘We are obliged to put our account out to tender.’
      • ‘The senior partners had agreed not put the contract out to tender, mainly due to the tight building schedule.’

Origin

Mid 16th century (as a legal term meaning ‘formally offer a plea or evidence, or money to discharge a debt’, also as a noun denoting such an offer): from Old French tendre, from Latin tendere ‘to stretch, hold forth’ (see tend).

Pronunciation

tender

/ˈtɛndə/

Main definitions of tender in English

: tender1tender2tender3

tender3

noun

  • 1with modifier A vehicle used by a fire service for carrying specified supplies or equipment or fulfilling a specified role.

    ‘three fire engines, including an emergency tender, attended the scene’
    • ‘Mr Pounder fears that three of the brigade's nine turntable ladders, known as aerial appliances, could be axed, plus several salvage equipment tenders which carry items such as specialist cutting gear.’
    • ‘Surrey Fire Service said two crews and a rescue tender had gone to the scene after reports of children trapped under the tree.’
    • ‘Eight fire tenders attended the fire at Grange Farm, Spaunton, near Kirkbymoorside, where firefighters struggled to control it because of difficulties getting water to the scene.’
    • ‘Fourteen council vans and lorries, and two fire tenders, staged a slow drive through the city centre tooting horns and winning support from the public.’
    • ‘The Essex Air Ambulance, three fire engines and a rescue tender rushed to the scene at about 9.50 am yesterday.’
    • ‘The fire brigade was out in force with an emergency tender, a high-rise platform engine and two regular fire engines.’
    • ‘Three fire engines and a rescue tender attended the crash which involved a car and two lorries.’
    • ‘The museum provided the answer as Airport staff frantically tried to track down the broken engine part for a 31-year-old fire tender.’
    • ‘More than a dozen appliances, including 10 pumps and a breathing apparatus tender from Bolton, attended the fire which started at about 7pm.’
    • ‘Scores of firefighters arrived in 25 vehicles including foam tenders designed to fight chemical fires.’
    • ‘Myers said no chances were taken and the main road was blocked off and a fire service tender was ordered in front of the mall shortly before 11 am.’
    • ‘That compares with the 45 regular fire tenders normally available to deal with the average 60 emergency calls made each day in the county.’
    • ‘Firefighters from Amesbury and Salisbury, and an emergency tender from Warminster, began making sure the front of the pub was secure.’
    • ‘The emergency tenders, which carry heavy-duty rescue equipment to incidents such as the Selby rail crash and serious road accidents, all need replacing.’
    • ‘There should also be ways to generate funds which will help the fire brigade acquire extra fire tenders and utility equipment that will enable them effectively fight fires.’
    • ‘Other equipment at the Livingstone airport includes two utility vehicles, fire tenders, an ambulance, and meteorological equipment.’
    • ‘Mr Wood was rushed to Rochdale Infirmary and paramedics, police and three fire appliances, with an emergency salvage tender, attended the scene.’
    • ‘The fire wrecked about 60 per cent of the single-storey garage before emergency tenders left the scene at 5.30 pm.’
    • ‘Lives may be put at risk when Pembrokeshire loses its emergency fire tender, according to the Fire Brigades Union.’
    • ‘They also criticised the community safety vehicles because they do not carry the same firefighting equipment as a traditional tender.’
    1. 1.1 A vehicle used in mobile operations by a public service or the armed forces.
      ‘she saw the police tender dash up and half a dozen men tumble out’
      • ‘Loyal Watcher, an ex-Royal Navy fleet tender with a range of more than 2500 miles, comfortably accommodates 12 heavily equipped divers.’
  • 2A dinghy or other boat used to ferry people and supplies to and from a ship.

    • ‘Tugs brought the mail ashore and passengers were slung ignominiously over the side in baskets and sent ashore in tenders.’
    • ‘It was several more minutes before the tender pulled alongside the ship's hull and coasted to a full stop.’
    • ‘Re-crewed and supplied by ocean-going tenders, the ships could pursue fish anywhere in the world for months on end without ever visiting a port or even sighting land.’
    • ‘Sailors aboard the seaplane tender USS Curtiss wore their go-to-town white uniforms.’
    • ‘In addition to the tugboat and its inflatable tender, we also had a small kaïki and skipper on site each day.’
    • ‘Dive kit and passengers are ferried along the shore in the tender.’
    • ‘But it turns out that she was the plywood tender to a fishing coble and had sunk in 3m the previous week.’
    • ‘You can tie up your own tender at the dinghy docks or go ashore in one of the harbor launches.’
    • ‘He was late for a question and answer session with Paul Allott, who announced that the good French champagne on St Barth's had caused Gower to miss his tender back to the ship.’
    • ‘We had reached the reef after a five-minute journey by tender from our mother ship, the Star Flyer, which had dropped anchor in Thailand's National Park in the Sea.’
    • ‘With permission to land on the island, Roebuck Bay's sleek tender vessels conveyed all to a small sandbar inside the lagoon.’
    • ‘On the forecastle deck the brass bell was struck, and with anchor down, the tenders were lifted out and readied to ferry passengers ashore.’
    • ‘I had ordered four friends into the tender, an 18-foot Boston Whaler, while Dan and I stayed aboard.’
    • ‘The chief Navy doctor took me on board the tender ship.’
    • ‘Some served as motor torpedo boat tenders, battle damage repair ships or aircraft engine repair ships.’
    • ‘We'll probably use either a small tender or our six-foot rowing boat depending on the numbers.’
    • ‘We nearly missed the last tender back to the ship.’
    • ‘While a little rubber ducky may suit well for short hops between boats in a snug cove, you may need a tougher, larger, and more seaworthy tender if you cruise to far away places.’
    • ‘An oil rig tender found the yacht in the Joseph Bonaparte Gulf on Friday and took two of the four crewmembers, both of whom were severely seasick, on board.’
    • ‘Paddling the canoe would be a treat, and learning to sail the tender would also be one.’
  • 3A trailing vehicle closely coupled to a steam locomotive to carry fuel and water.

    • ‘Even though it said CANADIAN PACIFIC on the tender.’
    • ‘The Goldenrock Railway Workshops dismantled it into three parts - wheels, boiler and tender used for stocking coal and water.’
    • ‘Two tenders behind are spare water cars for work train service.’
    • ‘This building also repaired tenders in steam days; a much taller section of the roof allowed boilers to be stood on end for riveting.’
    • ‘Two huge flags, as tall as the train itself and barely supported by the wind, trailed out bravely, one from the tender and the other from the rear wagon.’
    • ‘Generally, drawbar means at the rear of the tender.’
    • ‘On the other hand, the running gear was trammed like a Swiss watch, and the new tender tank is a work of art.’
    • ‘These near-indestructable Hi-Riser cars were rebuilt in the 1960's from steam locomotive tenders.’
    • ‘Not knowing who among the masked and robed passengers might recognize this fellow crewman it was decided to hide him in the coal tender for the duration of the trip.’
    • ‘True yard engines were equipped with slope back tenders.’
    • ‘But a second tender was taken, altered to carry water only including the space once occupied by ten tons of coal.’
    • ‘Two locomotives and tenders, ten carriages, fifteen goods wagons and one horsebox were purchased.’
    • ‘It will be given a tender from another departed locomotive and regain its former Sierra appearance.’
    • ‘On this particular day, my fireman and I had old #19 steamed up, oiled, greased, with a full tender of water and fuel.’
    • ‘Returning, the engine was on the west end of the train tender first, with the combine next followed by the freight cars.’
    • ‘If he has no tender awaiting, he can try to unload coal from the hopper spotted atop the ramp.’
    • ‘I know it had two feet of water in its Vanderbilt tender when it arrived back at Peach Creek with the loads, and I know the car number of each hopper that made up the train.’
    • ‘The locomotive, tender, and first three cars derailed, and the express car was partially telescoped by the tender.’
    • ‘No. 1057 represented the final years of steam with a Pyle National headlight centred on the smokebox door and a standard tender.’
    • ‘It pulled just two tenders, a shop car and two old Pullman crew cars.’
  • 4usually in combination or with modifier A person who looks after someone else or a machine or place.

    ‘Alexei signalled to one of the engine tenders’
    • ‘The tender on the bridge called our train on the radio to report that one of the doors in the baggage car on the rear of the train was open.’
    • ‘Seven minutes later, I heard another bridge tender tell the engineer that our rear lights looked fine, but that we had a door open in the baggage car.’
    • ‘All good dives finally come to an end and he surfaces, hooks in hand, beside the branch boat, inflates his BC, slips out of his gear and carefully hands in the hooks to a boat tender.’
    • ‘Often we found lock tenders coordinating our transit by having the doors on the next lock - miles ahead - opened ahead of time.’
    • ‘You could sit and chat to the owners and tenders.’

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘attendant, nurse’): from tend or shortening of attender (see attend).

Pronunciation

tender

/ˈtɛndə/