Definition of team in English:

team

noun

  • 1treated as singular or plural A group of players forming one side in a competitive game or sport.

    ‘the village cricket team’
    ‘his team played well’
    as modifier ‘team members’
    • ‘Cricket is a team game and yet on this tour too many players have hidden or avoided responsibility.’
    • ‘In this case, each player in a team plays a separate game with one of the opposing pair.’
    • ‘Sports stars have been invited to visit the borough schools in a bid to promote team games and competitive sports.’
    • ‘Guiseley have had a big influx of players for all their teams at pre-season training.’
    • ‘The mixed bag was welcome start to the season, with many new players of the home team playing their first game.’
    • ‘Women's sport, especially in team games, is yet to provide the same appeal as men's.’
    • ‘The crowd at the port city turned out to be the most sporting, with players of both teams applauded for good cricket.’
    • ‘That doesn't seem fair to players on teams that don't qualify for post-season games.’
    • ‘Previous England rugby sides, and England teams in many other sports, would have crumbled under the weight of such errors.’
    • ‘Our game is the toughest team sport in the world and success has to be earned the hard way.’
    • ‘The feature also discusses the great games, teams, and players of the tournament through the years.’
    • ‘Each team member played six games, earning a point for a win and half a point for a draw.’
    • ‘Players win games, and when teams have the right coach in the right situation, they win titles.’
    • ‘For the most part, hockey is truly a team game in a sports world that sells individuals.’
    • ‘There are also many games in which players are split into teams which compete against each other.’
    • ‘Pate now reads the sports pages everyday to keep up-to-date with the latest teams, games and players.’
    • ‘Rather, it is the level that separates whether a player helps his team win or lose games.’
    • ‘In a very competitive game both teams played some brilliant football.’
    • ‘This money is then paid into a pool, which is then paid out to players from each team in every game as weekly bonuses.’
    • ‘If team sports and ball games are not your thing, the romance of swords, and bows and arrows may appeal.’
    group, squad, side, band, bunch, company, party, gang, selection, crew, troupe, set, line-up, array
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Two or more people working together.
      ‘a team of researchers’
      • ‘Australia was a penal settlement at the time, and a team of convict labourers were set about the task.’
      • ‘Having said that I am going to run a very vigorous campaign and I have a team of workers anxious to get going.’
      • ‘She stressed the city council was not abandoning archaeology and would still employ a team of archaeologists.’
      • ‘They should have a proven ability to lead a team of people, be self-motivated and adaptable.’
      • ‘A team of lawyers and staff from Hammonds have devoted time and energy to fund-raising.’
      • ‘The Association is managed by a team of full time staff who report to a voluntary board of directors.’
      • ‘The council has won a pledge of £200,000 to put together a team of people to shape the future of the West End.’
      • ‘The move will mean two paid staff will lose their jobs and a team of 11 volunteer workers will be left without a cause to help.’
      • ‘A team of workers has just hit the streets to drop off leaflets, knock on doors and talk to local people about the new service.’
      • ‘We got a team of people trying to get the documentation that will tell us what came down.’
      • ‘The gym will have state-of-the-art equipment and will be serviced by a team of specialist fitness staff.’
      • ‘This is despite the considerable efforts of a team of would-be rescuers.’
      • ‘With the exception of Lee Grantham they were part of a team of individuals who organised and carried out the execution.’
      • ‘A team of seven people has already signed-up from the Gazette, but Sallie and Clive want to hear from you.’
      • ‘Each day a team of 30 staff start work at 6am to try to keep the Harrogate District free of litter.’
      • ‘This strategy said services should be provided by a team of specialists working together.’
      • ‘Twice the size of a normal bike, the bronze Fat Boy Harley has been made by a team of eight workers and taken six months to complete.’
      • ‘So it was good to be out on the water, with a team of people and be forced to put the work in.’
      • ‘Now we see him together with a team of fifty people execute a plan and successfully separate the twin girls.’
      • ‘The nation-wide search to find a team of new journalists was run during the summer and was a huge success.’
    2. 1.2informal Used before another word to form the name of a real or notional group which supports or favours the person or thing indicated.
      ‘are you team Mac or team PC?’
      ‘we're totally Team Jenna and can't wait for this delightful show to return’
      • ‘The opening address of the MC for the evening asked the audience to align themselves with either "Team Edward" or " Team Jacob".’
      • ‘I'm going to see Twilight Eclipse this weekend - so excited! Go TEAM EDWARD!’
      • ‘Fans wearing 'Team Cheryl' T-shirts delivered flowers to the star's home this weekend.’
      • ‘So Team Dimitri Or Team Adrian? Personally I'm Team Christian!’
      • ‘When Brad Pitt left Jennifer Aniston and later set up home with Angelina Jolie, women across the U.S. wore T-shirts declaring them members of 'Team Aniston' or 'Team Jolie'.’
      • ‘I don't see a lot of rabid Monkees fans declaring themselves members of Team Tork or Team Dolenz.’
      • ‘The backup's completed and the battery is still at 15% - way to go team netbook!’
      • ‘Are you Team Dog or Team Cat?’
      • ‘Team Firth all the way!’
    3. 1.3 Two or more animals, especially horses, in harness together to pull a vehicle.
      ‘the abbey's wagon and a team of horses are gone’
      • ‘It must have seemed strange driving a team of horses pushing a machine from behind, but I suppose they soon got used to it.’
      • ‘In winter, teams of horses dragged sledges loaded with cut logs across frozen lakes.’
      • ‘Celebration was order of the day for Clare Chappelhow and her team of horses at Blackdyke.’
      • ‘Throughout the war years hay was cut and raked with horse teams pulling the equipment.’
      • ‘He jiggled the reigns and clucked at his team of midnight-black horses.’
      • ‘Once pursed, the entire seine then had to be hauled ashore by teams of men and horses.’
      • ‘Snow and dirt fly from the horses' hooves as teams of horses rocket down a frozen, snow-covered track.’
      • ‘Romon called over his shoulder as he clucked the team of horses into motion.’
      • ‘His team pulled the sled deep into the night, Jason shouting orders left and right while he stood on the runners at the back of the sled.’
      • ‘The rigid collar and tandem harness allowed teams to pull with equal strength and greater efficiency.’
      • ‘Four months later he brought a team of horses to the Festival and landed the new juvenile handicap hurdle with Dabiroun.’
      • ‘Who would have thought that not even two teams of the strongest horses would be able to pull apart hemispheres enclosing a near vacuum?’
      • ‘That shadow passing in front of the moon, was that a team of reindeer pulling a sleigh through the sky?’
      • ‘The CFD was also fully mobilized using fire wagons pulled by horse teams.’
      • ‘He used an old steam boiler, filled with rocks, which was pulled by a horse or bullock team.’
      • ‘It was also reckoned to take three years to train the teams of men and horses effectively.’
      • ‘I don't know about you, but I'm not about to trade in my minivan for a buggy and a team of horses any time soon.’
      • ‘Two teams of horses pulled each wagon and each driver had a crossbow rider with him.’
      • ‘The latter seating four adults plus the driver and was pulled by a team of horses.’
      • ‘Before examining groups and teams in animal societies, it is important to understand both the nature of work and tasks.’
      pair, span, yoke, duo, set, rig, tandem
      View synonyms

verb

  • 1team upno object Come together as a team to achieve a common goal.

    ‘he teamed up with the band to produce the disc’
    • ‘Weber teamed up with the Lutzes to put the story together.’
    • ‘Limerick's Tim Rice teamed up with Ballard early in 2004 and was so impressed that he passed on his impressions to another aspiring Irishman.’
    • ‘Nassau County police teamed up with federal immigration agents to make these arrests.’
    • ‘He has recently teamed up with former band member Stewart Bowman for the first time in 30 years and completed a CD which will be sold for charity.’
    • ‘They quickly touched on how much they had in common and agreed to team up.’
    • ‘Dustin joined and teamed up with Jeremy and Christon, as the headed towards Salt Sands.’
    • ‘In July 1965 John and Rod teamed up with Brian Auger and his band, plus singer Julie Driscoll, to form The Steam Packet.’
    • ‘The Consumer Federation of America has teamed up with the Ford Foundation to help teach families how to save.’
    • ‘Combining music and theater the NSO teamed up with If Kids Theater Company, turning a flute concerto into a fairy tale fantasy.’
    • ‘This year, Shimano has teamed up with the League to promote the event, offering free commuter kits in fourteen selected cities.’
    • ‘His dad played in the Country Band and Brendan joined them as a teenager and then later teamed up with the Kieran Kelly's Ceili Band along with his old school pal Johnny Dawson.’
    • ‘He and Wazzock have decided to team up with the common goal of inflicting some misery on the troubled teenager.’
    • ‘Tri said the Army had teamed up with the Navy and Air Force to conduct regular operations against smuggling on Sumatra.’
    • ‘Though very good as individuals, they never achieved true greatness until one teamed up with the other.’
    • ‘And to promote the message the force has teamed up with furniture giant IKEA which is offering free timer switches to students.’
    • ‘By 1803, he had teamed up with Robert Emmet and together they planned another insurrection.’
    • ‘Following a run of five pantomimes at that time, Austin Flood, who had played the dame in those shows, went off to join the army, and Joe then teamed up with Tom Palmer.’
    • ‘The children's charity has teamed up with the Federation of Small Businesses and the British Chamber of Commerce to promote family friendly workplaces.’
    • ‘Victim Support in West Yorkshire has teamed up with the force's Major Crime Unit for the Street Crime Project.’
    • ‘The 60-strong choir has this time teamed up with the renowned Hepworth Brass Band which will set up in Holmfirth in 1882.’
    join, join up, join forces, collaborate, get together, come together, band together, work together
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  • 2usually team something withwith object Match or coordinate a garment with (another)

    ‘a pinstripe suit teamed with a crisp white shirt’
    • ‘The orange trouser suit was teamed with her trademark saucy shoes: embellished pointy ankle boots.’
    • ‘Cosmo tells us the safe way to wear animal print is to team a leopard print top with black pants and stilettos.’
    • ‘At Prada, Miuccia Prada teamed her narrow suits with a tie into a leu in a bit of East-meets-West kind of gimmickry.’
    match, coordinate, complement, pair up
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  • 3with object Harness (animals, especially horses) together to pull a vehicle.

    ‘the horses are teamed in pairs’
    • ‘The horses are teamed in pairs, the drivers mounted on the near horses.’
    harness, yoke, saddle, bridle, hitch up, couple
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • take one for the team

    • informal Willingly undertake an unpleasant task or make a personal sacrifice for the collective benefit of one's friends or colleagues.

      ‘I took one for the team by naming myself the designated driver’
      • ‘Props to Tony for taking one for the team.’
      • ‘You've got to take one for the team sometimes.’
      • ‘There is a balance between striking out as an individual and taking one for the team.’
      • ‘If public workers are willing to take one for the team, so to speak, they'll garner considerably more goodwill.’
      • ‘It's all about working together and personal sacrifice, taking one for the team.’
      • ‘Learning of her father's desperate finances, she decides to take one for the team and marry Roger.’
      • ‘Sometimes you have to take one for the team, especially when your team is the Human Race.’
      • ‘He's not happy with the pay freeze, but he's willing to take one for the team.’
      • ‘There's a difference between taking one for the team and being the fall guy.’
      • ‘Someday soon I hope we won't have to make that kind of choice, but for now, in the interest of improving visibility for women overall, we should be more than willing to take this one for the team.’

Origin

Old English tēam ‘team of draught animals’, of Germanic origin; related to German Zaum ‘bridle’, also to teem and tow, from an Indo-European root shared by Latin ducere ‘to lead’.

Pronunciation

team

/tiːm/