Definition of tea cosy in English:

tea cosy


  • A thick or padded cover placed over a teapot to keep the tea hot.

    • ‘I think I must have looked a bit like a doll on a tea cosy!’
    • ‘It's a nicely worded piece, but I've pushed the bit about Mrs Burgess's collection of crocheted tea cosies up to the top.’
    • ‘District-wide, Craven has a shortfall of 54,000 grammes of fluff that, potentially, could be recycled to make 30 news editor's tea cosies.’
    • ‘The competition for September is the most interesting tea cosy.’
    • ‘That's why we're the country that invented the tea cosy.’
    • ‘She started to make crafts from the material and has produced some very unusual crafts, cushions, tea cosies, aprons, bags and much more.’
    • ‘Mum gave it to my aunt who thought it was a tea cosy!’
    • ‘Like fish and chips and your gran's crocheted tea cosies, Victoria Wood is the very essence of Northern England in all its dark, satanic glory.’
    • ‘Far from being risibly old-fashioned or nostalgic, the idea of knitting a tea cosy has enormous appeal for a whole generation of young women, as well as older ones.’
    • ‘Marjorie Bligh notably used plastic bags as woven tea cosies but didn't pretend there was anything other than ‘waste not - want not’ behind it.’
    • ‘After it was washed it was dried on a tea cosy that sits on a biscuit tin.’
    • ‘To Josefina's delight, Beatrix was wearing a knitted tea cosy on her head, and when she laughed she rolled a little and slapped her knee with her small chubby hands.’
    • ‘On the entrance floor level, the Winter Garden has a self-service restaurant and dining area and a shop where the emphasis is on fine art publications rather than tasteful tea cosies.’
    • ‘Cavity wall insulation acts like a tea cosy, preventing heat from escaping from a house and keeping rooms warmer for longer.’
    • ‘Or why not add pockets to the sides of a tea cosy and fill with rosemary.’
    • ‘The only concession to summer is that most people have removed their hats except my grandmother (fifth from right) who is wearing a cross between a meringue and a tea cosy.’
    • ‘Only his wife was allowed to wash it, and it had to be dried on a tea cosy over a biscuit tin to keep its shape.’
    • ‘Even our prime minister felt it necessary to proclaim his secular outlook by donning what looked like an inverted tea cosy on his head at his annual iftar.’
    • ‘There must be something very strange in a man who, if left alone in a room with a tea cosy, doesn't try it on.’
    • ‘Expect North Korea to start selling nuclear tea cosies within the decade.’


tea cosy