Main definitions of tare in English

: tare1tare2

tare1

noun

  • 1A vetch, especially the common vetch.

    • ‘The juniors are fishing at Rawcliffe Lake on a Tuesday evening at present where lots of roach are taking an interest in hemp and tares.’
    • ‘Good soil is made by plenty of bulky waste organic material or growing winter tares or clover during a resting year.’
    • ‘That provides much more scope for cultivating and planting up the vacated bed before autumn, and while there's no solid plan evolved yet we're thinking around spuds and a good over-wintering green manure such as grazing rye, phacelia or winter tares.’
    • ‘Also, the field should be watched for several days to prevent pigeons, which are remarkably fond of tares, from devouring much of the sown seed.’
    • ‘This year I'm using winter tares - a winter hardy vetch which will fix nitrogen and provide good protection, but in the past I've also used clovers, buckwheat, phacelia and grazing rye.’
  • 2tares(in biblical use) an injurious weed resembling corn when young (Matt. 13:24–30).

    • ‘Then Jesus sent the multitude away, and went into the house: and His disciples came unto Him, saying, Declare unto us the parable of the tares of the field.’
    • ‘This is summed up in the biblical antitheses between the wheat and the tares, the old man and the new, outward and inward.’
    • ‘Some recover and go on to ‘produce a good crop,’ while others become weeds, or tares in God's field, of whom Jesus Christ made a dire warning in another of His parables.’
    • ‘Here the significance of each detail of the parable of the tares is explained.’
    • ‘Drawing on biblical metaphor, he looks to Jesus' parable about the wheat field sowed with tares, not to be separated until the final harvest.’

Origin

Middle English: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

tare

/tɛː/

Main definitions of tare in English

: tare1tare2

tare2

noun

  • 1An allowance made for the weight of the packaging in order to determine the net weight of goods.

    • ‘The tare weight of a 463L pallet is about 300 pounds.’
    • ‘In comparison, 40-foot containers have a tare weight of 7,000 pounds, a payload of 60,000 pounds, and a gross weight capacity of 67,000 pounds.’
    • ‘After factoring in the tare weight, or weight of the empty bottle, the operator can determine how much liquid is left inside.’
    1. 1.1 The weight of a motor vehicle, railway carriage, or aircraft without its fuel or load.
      • ‘With only 1725 kg tare weight, the engine certainly produced plenty of power in all circumstances.’
      • ‘Side loading eliminated the need to drive over the deck to reach other flat cars, so it was eliminated, along with its expense, and more importantly, tare weight.’
      • ‘And they want lighter tare weights, zero maintenance, and more automatic transmissions.’
      • ‘This tag is used to identify automatically the vehicle and its relevant tare mass, after which the gross mass is determined by weighbridge instrumentation.’
      • ‘Tare weight is often published upon the sides of railway cars to facilitate the computation of the load carried.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from French, literally deficiency, tare, from medieval Latin tara, based on Arabic ṭaraḥa reject, deduct.

Pronunciation:

tare

/tɛː/