Main definitions of tang in English

: tang1tang2tang3

tang1

noun

  • 1[in singular] A strong taste, flavour, or smell:

    ‘the clean salty tang of the sea’
    • ‘If the tide was out, I could smell the tang of seaweed and the musky odor of the mud flats, and hear the clicking sounds as the barnacles and mussels closed up their shells.’
    • ‘I have come in to breathe in the still, dark air, the scent of prosciutto waiting on the slicer, the tang of lemon leaves.’
    • ‘With this fast Indian fish curry, the refreshing tang comes from fresh ginger, while spices combine to give a complex backdrop of flavour.’
    • ‘The heat of the peppers is tempered by the peanuts, the sweetness of the honey balanced by the soy sauce and the citrusy tang of the ginger complemented by the garlic.’
    • ‘It was fantastic: a very imaginative combination of tastes, from the saltiness of the Italian cured ham to the soft cheese and delicate fruit flavours, with the added tang of a balsamic sauce.’
    • ‘Under full sail, you're one with the wind and the water, the sun warming your skin, the tang of salt spray on your tongue.’
    • ‘Then she smelt the sharp tang of sulphur again and turned back.’
    • ‘I noticed the slight tang of ginger on his breath.’
    • ‘In summer, I add scoops of rich ice-cream; in winter, natural yoghurt and flower honey give a fragrant tang.’
    • ‘You can hear the waves breaking on the shore and a salty tang fills the moonlight air.’
    • ‘She says it just gives it a bit of a tang, you can't taste the cheese.’
    • ‘The salty tang hung in the air, making the atmosphere seem oppressive and dangerous.’
    • ‘I bit my lip until I tasted the bitter tang of blood.’
    • ‘Set against spice of the chili and the sharp tang of the lime, it is an intense combination of tastes that balance beautifully with the lightness of the fish itself.’
    • ‘A cool breeze wound through the narrow streets, and the tang of the sea was stronger.’
    • ‘The balmy wind caressed their cheeks as they could taste the salty tang of the sea on their lips.’
    • ‘Tasting the salty tang of my own sweat, I sighed tiredly.’
    • ‘I drank and grimaced at the tartness, the tang of spice, but it helped settle my stomach.’
    • ‘Even she hadn't noticed she'd bitten her lip until the coppery tang of blood rushed her taste buds.’
    • ‘She had missed the smell of the sea, the salty tang to the breeze that brushed her cloak and her hair.’
    flavour, taste, savour
    smell, odour, aroma, fragrance, perfume, redolence
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A characteristic quality:
      ‘his words came out with a distinct tang of broad Lancashire’
      • ‘He created a unique fusion of the swing of the US big bands of the 40s and the tang of his Cuban roots, aimed fairly and squarely at the dance floor and at popular appeal.’
      • ‘The film is foremost a screwball comedy, albeit one with considerable tang.’
      • ‘As well as rural Forties class culture, with a Northern tang, the other influence is Heath Robinson, that genius inventor of mad machines.’
      • ‘Use of the first person, moreover, gives this book the tang of an in-house, partisan staff study rather than a dispassionate analysis.’
      • ‘Even the air was electric, edged with the tantalising tang of uncertainty, of the unexpected.’
  • 2The projection on the blade of a tool such as a knife, by which the blade is held firmly in the handle:

    ‘a full tang is used for strength’
    • ‘My interest in tang sights was fueled even more with the chance to test a Winchester High Wall from the rifle company.’
    • ‘Of course the most notable feature of the series is the absence of a protruding grip safety tang.’
    • ‘The knife and fork slot together as one, and the outer face of each handle is ornamented with a shaped ivory tang inset with horn, brass, and coral.’
    • ‘The 3 1/2-inch blade is high carbon stainless steel with full visible tang construction.’
    • ‘No ordinary fixed blade knives, these were of a difficult integral design in which the blade, bolsters and tang are machined from a solid piece of steel billet.’
    • ‘The hilt was usually without a pommel or crossguard, whilst the tang went all the way through the smaller seax handles and was clenched over at the end of the grip.’
    • ‘There was a time when having a tang sight on your rifle was the sign of a serious marksman.’
    • ‘Winchester has reintroduced the tang safety on its lever actions this year, replacing the unpopular cross-bolt safety.’
    • ‘The blades are housed in a brass lining and feature the Remington trademark etch and tang stamp.’
    • ‘The new Winchesters feature inertial triggers and a conventional tang safety that also doubles as a barrel selector.’
    • ‘It's important to note the sight will not work with the new versions made by Winchester that have the tang safety installed.’
    • ‘This Japanese Sword Index has very detailed and thorough information about sword types, blades, tangs, even flaws.’
    • ‘The tang, or shank, that went into the solid handle was notched and recessed on each side.’
    • ‘The tapered tang reduces weight in the handle and places the balance further forward where it increases control.’
    • ‘The lock's radiused, arc-shaped design permits maximum surface contact with the blade's tang.’
    • ‘The models have concealed tangs inside the handles, again with one-piece construction of solid steel.’
    • ‘Arrowhead types include those with round shoulders and a swollen tang as well as those with angular, slanting shoulders and bilaterally knobbed or spurred tangs.’
    • ‘The knife has a curvaceous handle with front and rear guards built into the full tang blade steel.’
    • ‘For more irony, though the old-style grip safety tang tends to bite larger hands, it causes no problem for most small-handed shooters.’
    • ‘The Puma rifles, not carbines, are already drilled and tapped for tang sights.’

Origin

Middle English (denoting a snake's tongue, formerly believed to be a stinging organ; also denoting the sting of an insect): from Old Norse tangi point, tang of a knife.

Pronunciation:

tang

/taŋ/

Main definitions of tang in English

: tang1tang2tang3

tang2

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • Make a loud ringing or clanging sound:

    ‘the bronze bell tangs’
    • ‘All of a sudden St. Philip's ten bells start tanging - one o’clock already - and at once the workshops and factories around the yard begin disgorging throngs of workers on their way to lunch’
    • ‘The joy-bells tang out a merry peal, and the inhabitants in general put lights into their windows.’

Origin

Mid 16th century: imitative.

Pronunciation:

tang

/taŋ/

Main definitions of tang in English

: tang1tang2tang3

tang3

noun

  • A surgeonfish which occurs around reefs and rocky areas, where it browses on algae.

    • ‘What struck me most were the brilliantly-coloured blue tangs, surgeonfish which don't want to be photographed, and the soft corals.’
    • ‘Aided by a friendly blue tang called Dory, who suffers from short-term memory loss, Marlin travels through shark infested waters, overcoming myriad dangers to reunite with his beloved boy.’
    • ‘The great clouds of yellow black and white banner angelfish, brilliant blue fusiliers, yellow tangs and smart surgeonfish are gone.’
    • ‘The clownfish and hippo tang, for example, look almost identical to their real-life counterparts.’
    • ‘Holding the chain railing, we followed our leader and had up-close encounters with yellow tails, sergeant majors, blue tang, trumpet fish, and other reef dwellers.’

Origin

Mid 18th century: from tang.

Pronunciation:

tang

/taŋ/

Main definitions of tang in English

: tang1tang2tang3

Tang

proper noun

  • A dynasty ruling China 618–c.906, a period noted for territorial conquest and great wealth and regarded as the golden age of Chinese poetry and art.

Pronunciation:

Tang

/taŋ/