Definition of tame in English:

tame

adjective

  • 1(of an animal) not dangerous or frightened of people; domesticated.

    ‘the fish are so tame you have to push them away’
    • ‘The wild creature was only tame under her hands.’
    • ‘She's a very tame beast, and she accepts the bit well as long as you ride her smoothly.’
    • ‘I took her to the petting zoo, which has tame goats to pet.’
    • ‘If an animal is domesticated or tame, there would be lesser reason to fear that such an animal would pose a threat to the public.’
    • ‘Instead of importing tame pigs, people from several different countries domesticated the animals themselves.’
    • ‘Children enjoy the farm setting and the tame farm animals.’
    • ‘The mother cat's quite tame and not very old herself, and the kittens are probably around 5-6 weeks old.’
    • ‘These efforts produced a relatively tame dog, able and willing to track and to hunt.’
    • ‘Be aware that injured animals, even tame pets will bite savagely if given a chance.’
    • ‘You can make a good fist of doing it, but in the end you have to come to terms with the fact that you are not dealing with a tame beast.’
    • ‘Thankfully the donkeys and cows were tame, and were easily chased out of camp if they got too close.’
    • ‘Although most of the park's lions are tame, lions are, after all, still lions.’
    • ‘A few tame lambs scamper around, probably bottle fed, and a single donkey nibbles at the grass among the goat-hair tents.’
    • ‘One internet site agrees, declaring the animals to be ‘noble and tame dogs with the family, but distrustful of strangers’.’
    • ‘He has never encountered any tame animals besides dogs.’
    • ‘I had to feed the chooks each night, help with making the butter and look after our tame pig.’
    • ‘He said that it must be remembered that elephants are not naturally tame.’
    • ‘A tiny multicoloured parrot flew from shoulder to shoulder to peer at us inquisitively, while a small tame monkey searched for fleas in our hair.’
    • ‘Almost every other tame creature - from the dog to the horse - came to our homes under very specific circumstances, unlike the cat.’
    • ‘The 1911 Protection of Animals Act prohibits the hunting of tame or domestic animals.’
    domesticated, domestic, not wild, docile, tamed, disciplined, broken, broken-in, trained, not fierce, gentle, mild, used to humans
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    1. 1.1informal (of a person) willing to cooperate.
      ‘every businessman needs a tame lawyer at his elbow’
      • ‘So I think there are a number of people within the Met who are feeding information to what they regard as tame reporters.’
      • ‘Matthew, for a contract to be valid, there are actually lots of gritty details and for that reason it's sometimes not a bad idea to see a tame lawyer.’
      • ‘Reports in Shanghai's usually tame newspapers complained that journalists were barred from approaching the mine.’
      • ‘It takes all the fun out of it if people think you have a tame journalist rather than being able to command headlines on your own merits.’
      • ‘The newsroom became the home of the tame dissident and the compliant office holder.’
      • ‘The biotech companies and their tame scientists are using other people's poverty to engineer their own enrichment.’
      • ‘With a tame sister republic to the north, the Belgian departments were lightly garrisoned by troops not expecting to be used to keep domestic order.’
      • ‘After their initial statements, all of the parties kept a careful silence, with the complete acquiescence of a tame media.’
      • ‘She's intending to visit again, with a sister in-tow, and possibly once more with a tame builder who will advise her on the practicability of extending the house.’
      • ‘Feigning a serious illness, he arranges for him to have a tame doctor prescribe an ocean voyage to Hawaii as a cure.’
      • ‘Anyone with a tame doctor (which would be everyone I know) can get an excuse note for those.’
      • ‘He used this to block his mother's attempts to re-examine his father with her own tame doctors.’
      • ‘But the public's current disillusionment with tame government scientists in the wake of BSE is high.’
      • ‘On the other hand, religion makes brave valiant men meek tame and cowardly such that they refuse to shed blood even for their motherland.’
      • ‘It seems that they may not have expected to find that the man would be so tame and co-operative as to give them a free hand to engage in their business and flee the scene.’
  • 2derogatory Not exciting, adventurous, or controversial.

    ‘network TV on Saturday night is a pretty tame affair’
    • ‘It was a pretty tame affair compared to last year.’
    • ‘The festival in her honour was a tame affair until a few years ago.’
    • ‘These films are really tame, innocent adventures, offering a real, if occasionally warped view of the South.’
    • ‘But I realize that it was very tame advice today, but that for many people, it was still very, very, perfectly valid.’
    • ‘An exciting experience then, but very tame compared with today's high-speed jet travel.’
    • ‘I responded rather half-heartedly with a fairly tame story from my past, and chucked her the names of a few people who I thought might be better suited.’
    • ‘Meet and greets like this are usually pretty tame affairs.’
    • ‘Compared with the second half the opening half was a tame affair.’
    • ‘If you like village detective stories with a couple of murders - fine, but compared to today's stories they are so tame!’
    • ‘By modern rock standards we were tame, but at the time, it was something new that people had never seen before.’
    • ‘Now I'm not a big fan of such parades, but this one sounds pretty tame even according to the people opposed to them.’
    • ‘There were only a few rapids and they were extremely tame.’
    • ‘Overall it was a rather tame affair with no controversy on any subject.’
    • ‘Pretty tame by some people's standards, no doubt, but plenty of excitement for us.’
    • ‘The subpoena hearing, which is normally a tame affair, was contentious because the music industry sees it as a test case.’
    • ‘On the pitch, the game was a much more tame affair.’
    • ‘I didn't like the bars and my social life was pretty tame and domestic.’
    • ‘Her parents had seemed responsible and tame, but they weren't.’
    • ‘But some think the story of a drowning marsh and a heart-warmingly functional Mormon family is too tame.’
    • ‘But they were tame responses compared with those by Democrats.’
    unexciting, uninteresting, uninspired, uninspiring, dull, bland, flat, insipid, spiritless, pedestrian, vapid, lifeless, dead, colourless, run-of-the-mill, mediocre, ordinary, prosaic, humdrum, boring, tedious, tiresome, wearisome
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  • 3North American (of a plant) produced by cultivation.

    ‘a big field of tame hay’
    • ‘Residual vegetation forming a matted mulch was likewise a determinant of nest density and success in tame plant communities, with smooth brome demonstrating greatest nest density.’
    • ‘I suspect that people haven't had enough practice with it as a tame plant to know its best habits and favorite conditions, though they're easy enough to see in the wild.’
    • ‘My family moved to this location about 3 years ago when there wasn't a single tame plant on the place.’
    1. 3.1(of land) cultivated.
      • ‘We want to have a nice combination of wild & tame land, where we can build up the soil of the ‘farm’ and also replenish trees, provide a habitat for wildlife, and generally be good stewards of this little plot of earth we've been blessed with.’
      • ‘But this time around caring for each individual needs was not that easy, and his once tame land started to grow unmanageable and wild.’
      • ‘The traces of their times were left here even by citizens of the mighty Roman empire, who were encouraged to settle in this area by riches of nature, fertile land, forests and rivers, which were for centuries a magical attraction for people who settled on this tame land.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Domesticate (an animal)

    ‘wild rabbits can be kept in captivity and eventually tamed’
    • ‘The Asian elephant featured strongly in Buddhism and Brahminism and the elephants were tamed and domesticated to be able to be used efficiently.’
    • ‘He told her how much he loved horses, even taught her some tips on how to tame a wild horse that just got bridled from the wilderness.’
    • ‘One who would be inspired by the colours on my face and the changing season outside to make love to my hair and tame the wild beast that it is.’
    • ‘On the other hand, terrestrial species are more often domesticated, while only a few marine species are tamed, mainly in zoos, dolphinaria or so called ‘Sea Worlds’.’
    • ‘When horses were tamed their first military use was in drawing light carts which served as shooting and fighting platforms.’
    • ‘You will be able to tame a creature and keep it as a pet once you have reached a certain skill level and success rate with that particular mob.’
    • ‘It was rare that he got excited to the point of babbling about anything, but the thrill of catching and taming a wild horse was something she could easily understand.’
    • ‘A tame animal does not pass that tameness onto its offspring; taming is not a heritable, genetic change, and there is no simple way to discover when a hominid first tamed another species.’
    • ‘The whole population devoted their time to taming horses.’
    • ‘Alexander's early potential is seen in his ability to tame wild horses (like Hector in The Illyiad).’
    • ‘Villagers believe the shaman uses black magic to help tame the elephant and sever ties to the mother.’
    • ‘Some live out their circus fantasies by taming lions or elephants, but aerial acts combine macho cool and athletic grace.’
    • ‘If anyone's succeeded in taming their black dog, drop me a note sometime and let me know what worked for you.’
    • ‘Africans, for example, were criticized for not taming the elephant, which had proved so valuable in Asia.’
    • ‘She shows him the quick sketch she has done of him lying on the grass smoking a cigar, and then takes out another sketch she made of him years ago, back home, taming a horse.’
    • ‘It was only after the Mongols tamed horses, yaks and camels that they took to a nomadic herding lifestyle.’
    • ‘Who was the Greek hero who tamed the winged horse Pegasus?’
    • ‘Cockatiels make the most endearing, affectionate, responsive and easily tamed pets around.’
    • ‘She tamed the beast so she gets to keep it.’
    • ‘Wild crops such as wheat and barley began to be cultivated, and wild animals such as sheep and goats were tamed and then domesticated.’
    domesticate, break, train, master, subdue, subjugate, bring to heel, enslave
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Make less powerful and easier to control.
      ‘the battle to tame inflation’
      • ‘You don't throw rocks at the guy who's trying to tame the tiger.’
      • ‘But 25 years of European exile and a gradual mellowing of the spirit have tamed the Australian rocker's legendary excesses.’
      • ‘Will she be able to tame the unruly private bus drivers who often hold the city life to ransom and streamline the chaotic city traffic?’
      • ‘A few drops of either product, worked through your hair, tames unruly strands and adds significant shine.’
      • ‘Interest rates jump in an effort to tame inflation, the inevitable by-product of unrestrained spending.’
      • ‘Isn't it also about - or I should say, how do you avoid it being about mind over matter, you know, that old Western paradigm of the rational mind controlling or taming the body?’
      • ‘Emotion, though we believe we can control it, is so volatile that is like taming the storm.’
      • ‘The last time police repression was used to tame the powerful Italian left was in the 1970s.’
      • ‘I was working on taming my out of control curly black hair, it wasn't going so well, I had given up on trying to blow dry it straight, so I just let it go.’
      • ‘Serum actually works very well in taming unruly strands.’
      • ‘Dab a little on your eyebrows to tame unruly hairs.’
      • ‘Although times are still tough there, inflation has been tamed and the foundation stones are in place for the country to transform itself in the run-up to joining the EU.’
      • ‘Teaching can curb and tame an undisciplined enthusiasm.’
      • ‘To support this she claims that women viewed it as hospitable and welcoming, not as something harsh or forbidding that needed to be tamed or overcome.’
      • ‘This is obviously much easier than traditional forms of meditation that took much practice and discipline to tame the mind.’
      • ‘That's a major shift for the Fed, which has spent the last quarter-century trying to tame inflation and contain price increases.’
      • ‘Her unruly teeth have been tamed into a neat, pearly, Californian smile, the parakeet spiked hair is now a glossy black mane.’
      • ‘But it may simply be naïve to think that any country can permanently tame the tiger of tribalism.’
      • ‘At 48, he is learning to tame his creative spirit and take on just a couple of projects at a time.’
      • ‘In these circumstances parliament, rather than being a mechanism by which mass pressure is applied against the ruling class, is a mechanism for taming the representatives of mass feeling.’

Origin

Old English tam (adjective), temmian (verb), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch tam and German zahm, from an Indo-European root shared by Latin domare and Greek daman tame, subdue.

Pronunciation:

tame

/teɪm/