Definition of talent in English:

talent

noun

  • 1[mass noun] Natural aptitude or skill:

    ‘he possesses more talent than any other player’
    [count noun] ‘she displayed a talent for garden design’
    • ‘Kate was a popular pupil at school, with a talent for art, music and drama.’
    • ‘Late in life she showed a talent for understanding technical briefings.’
    • ‘Madison is a refreshing mature artist with natural talent and strong views about all aspects of her music and career.’
    • ‘Tutors at the college were bowled over by her natural artistic talent and offered her a place on the course.’
    • ‘Son of Imelda and Tom, Emmet showed great artistic talent and ability from a very early age.’
    • ‘As a child and as a teenager, I often wrote fiction for pleasure, and was told that I had a talent for it.’
    • ‘Jamie has a reading age of nine and has poor writing and maths skills, but has a talent for working with his hands.’
    • ‘Kalina is also very creative, with a talent for painting and design, and wants to be a fine arts dealer.’
    • ‘She proved to have such a talent for ballet that she will now be trained with the best in the country.’
    • ‘His ability to mix music and his emerging studio talent made many artists visit his studio to record.’
    • ‘A former Westhoughton man who had a talent for recording his life and times has left an interesting legacy.’
    • ‘By dint of hard work and determination Piper used his natural artistic talent and practical skills to great effect.’
    • ‘Trusting in her talent and staying in touch with reality seems to have been the wisest career plan of all so far.’
    • ‘His mother, Jini, was an artist and his father, Mark, a farmer with a talent for photography.’
    • ‘He is a player of real talent and skill and has the ability to make a real and lasting impression at the highest level.’
    • ‘Her soulful lyrical style and dedication to dance has seen her jump up to fore of local young musical talent.’
    • ‘Stiles especially shows a talent for deadpan comedy that very few of her recent films have given her the opportunity to show.’
    • ‘Stunning works of art in their own right, they display his artistic talent and great flair for design.’
    • ‘One of her most endearing qualities is a talent for comedy, although she is not aware of it herself.’
    • ‘A talent for design and beauty makes visual art or architecture a good choice of profession.’
    flair, aptitude, facility, gift, knack, technique, touch, bent, ability, expertise, capacity, power, faculty
    strength, strong point, forte, genius, brilliance
    dexterity, adroitness, skill, cleverness, virtuosity, artistry
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 People possessing natural aptitude or skill:
      ‘I signed all the talent in Rome’
      [count noun] ‘Simon is a talent to watch’
      • ‘Populated by such enormous talent, the music industry can be a daunting world to enter.’
      • ‘On the field he reads the game very well and possesses immense talent.’
      • ‘On Saturday, against Rangers, he will come up against the latest generation of footballing talent.’
      • ‘He is recognised in Victorian state cricket as a player who possesses a substantial degree of natural talent.’
      • ‘Identifying talent and providing an opportunity to exhibit it is of immense importance.’
      • ‘These creative young people are part of the vanguard of new talent blossoming in our midst.’
      • ‘The coaches pick these players on the basis of their talent, skill and ability to work as a team.’
      • ‘We were delighted to see such a good crowd and plenty of talent on the night.’
      • ‘The new venture aims to find and polish the next generation of showbiz talent.’
      • ‘Until now a system hasn't been in place to identify talent and bring it through to the national side.’
      • ‘Three top talent spotters will open a new office in Glasgow tomorrow to sign up the cream of the country's new talent.’
      • ‘He had come all the way from a small village to watch the best of talent gathered from all over the country.’
      • ‘The film is quintessentially British and showcases some of the country's finest talent.’
      • ‘The news is sure to please the Gigg Lane faithful, who relish watching home-grown talent.’
      • ‘All of the team possess undoubted talent and they should come good in the weeks to come.’
      • ‘The cream of local musical talent have come together to perform in aid of this very good cause.’
      • ‘Throughout his long career, Domingo has been devoted to fostering the next generation of talent.’
      • ‘Jazz came to town at the weekend with Bingley becoming home to some of the nation's brightest jazz talent.’
      • ‘Still performing in his own right, he now spends much of his time coaching and advising a new generation of talent.’
      • ‘It was a close competition as there was so much artistic talent on display on the day.’
    2. 1.2British informal People regarded as sexually attractive or as prospective sexual partners:
      ‘most Saturday nights I have this urge to go on the hunt for new talent’
  • 2A former weight and unit of currency, used especially by the ancient Romans and Greeks:

    ‘a mighty steed bought from a Thessalian merchant for thirteen talents’
    • ‘So set my ransom as you wish, tribune -- calculated in talents not sesterces.’
    • ‘Each amount mentioned is a combination of an amount in gold - a fraction of a gram in each case — and an amount in talents.’

Origin

Old English talente, talentan (as a unit of weight), from Latin talenta, plural of talentum weight, sum of money, from Greek talanton. talent is a figurative use with biblical allusion to the parable of the talents (Matt. 25:14–30).

Pronunciation:

talent

/ˈtalənt/