Definition of take up (or pick up) the baton in English:

take up (or pick up) the baton

phrase

  • Accept a particular duty or responsibility.

    ‘it was left to the capital's campuses to take up the baton’
    • ‘Younger people are needed to take up the baton and continue to fight for Bingley, but there seems to be little interest.’
    • ‘This time last year, another past student, Ruth Maloney, took up the baton as musical director for such school productions and has done a wonderful job.’
    • ‘‘I hope to pick up the baton where he's left it,’ Spence said last week.’
    • ‘Their father was a great loss but we were all delighted when Elaine and John decided to take up the baton.’
    • ‘There are younger players, like Owen, who have picked up the baton, and England still have other good strikers.’
    • ‘Somebody needs to pick up the baton here and, you know, without kind of waiting for a consensus or without demanding concessions.’
    • ‘This is a Government initiative and Bradford is happy to take up the baton.’
    • ‘So it goes back to what we've been talking about for months, business spending needs to pick up the baton.’
    • ‘This year, people in 23 other locations around the country took up the baton and organised Goal Miles in their own locality.’
    • ‘There are plenty of other districts in Essex which are willing to pick up the baton.’