Definition of take the bull by the horns in English:

take the bull by the horns

phrase

  • Deal decisively with a difficult or dangerous situation.

    ‘she decided to take the bull by the horns and organize things for herself’
    • ‘All this could have been quite enough flamenco for one week, but taking the bull by the horns, I returned on Tuesday for the Compania Antonio El Pipa in De Tablao.’
    • ‘Hawick finally took the bull by the horns and, in typically rumbustious form, rumbled upfield where they won an attacking lineout right on the Melrose five-metre line.’
    • ‘Some forty years ago, the Soviets took the bull by the horns and launched Yuri Gagarin into space.’
    • ‘We are taking the bull by the horns and saying we have to move the church to where we see the centre of the Christian worship to be.’
    • ‘He said: ‘I'd always wanted to do sign writing and one day I took the bull by the horns and did it.’’
    • ‘This deeply divided body, which is averse to making tough decisions, is highly unlikely to take the bull by the horns and be decisive in choosing a method.’
    • ‘One school in Minnesota really took the bull by the horns.’
    • ‘‘They were the ones who have been prepared to take the bull by the horns and deal with the incompetence of the police with regard to investigation of their cases,’ he said.’
    • ‘However, there is no contemporary equivalent to the reconstruction modernists that took the bull by the horns in Britain in the late 1940s.’
    • ‘If your money problems are pushing you towards the edge of financial disaster, now's the time to take the bull by the horns and deal with them.’