Definition of take one's place in English:

take one's place

phrase

  • Take up one's usual or recognized position.

    • ‘She thus takes her place as a literary mediator, teaching us to recognize the validity of other stories about selves as a first step toward rethinking the stories we have told and will tell.’
    • ‘When I turned eighteen I joined the Order of the Eastern Star and finally took my place with Mother and the other ladies in those meetings about which I'd long wondered.’
    • ‘After her release from prison in 1919 the Countess took her place in the Dail Eireann where she held the position of Minister for Labour.’
    • ‘Despite being bruised and shaken, he took his place on the grid in 24th position - way behind his rivals.’
    • ‘You took your place alongside, or backstage and onstage, to some extent during rehearsals and where you could, you were part of performances.’
    • ‘It was very much a late late show at the RSC on Friday night as Waterford United took their place at the top of the Eircom League with their second straight win on the trot.’
    • ‘Just because you have passed a few exams and ticked a few boxes, it doesn't mean that you are in an ideal position to take your place in society.’
    • ‘Ultimately when I retired there were plenty of them in position to take my place.’
    • ‘At the end of a long apprenticeship, a young man was expected to produce a ‘masterpiece’, i.e. a piece of work which proved that he had mastered his craft and was capable of taking his place among the recognised practitioners.’
    • ‘Kevin could be perfectly positioned to take his place in the dark reign of hackers and spammers.’