Definition of take counsel in English:

take counsel

phrase

  • Discuss a problem.

    ‘the party leader and chairman took counsel together’
    • ‘A running back in his first year at Ohio State University, he has been taking counsel on the prospect of overturning the league regulations to earn himself a fast-track pass towards millionaire status.’
    • ‘We looked at those issues, listened to the advice, took counsel from civil libertarians - who raised some legitimate issues - and looked at how this legislation ties in with the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act.’
    • ‘The Commander sat at a round table with the heads of the five departments, all men, taking counsel with them.’
    • ‘Alexis de Tocqueville wrote, in the 1830s, that the great constitutive power of the American republic was its town councils and rural communities, in which small assemblies of citizens took counsel for their immediate good.’
    • ‘And let him also take counsel with his spirit and grasp with his mind still greater ability.’
    • ‘I hope we can use the time between now and then to reflect, to pray, to consult and to take counsel.’
    • ‘Let them then solemnly take counsel with each other as the means whereby the great human family can live in peace.’
    • ‘I think it had whispered to him things about himself which he did not know, things of which he had no conception till he took counsel with this great solitude - and the whisper had proved irresistibly fascinating.’
    • ‘As long as you're not going off on a solo run and you consult and take counsel by speaking to other players and people, then you can make a decision on what direction to take.’
    • ‘She says the party has drifted away from roots over past 10 years with the leaders taking counsel from personal advisers and consultants instead of the party itself.’