Definition of take in English:

take

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Lay hold of (something) with one's hands; reach for and hold.

    ‘he leaned forward to take her hand’
    • ‘He reached out to take her hand, but halted, his attention turning elsewhere.’
    • ‘She reached over and took Skyler's hand then raised his chin to look him straight in the eye.’
    • ‘He stood up, reaching out and taking her hand so that they walked together from the courtyard.’
    • ‘The giant reached down and took his son by the hand, leading him off to a nearby creek.’
    • ‘Claire reached out to take her arm, shifting carefully on her makeshift lounger.’
    • ‘Lacey reached forward and took it, her eyes briefly skimming over the first few pages.’
    • ‘Mack agreed, taking the ticket and placing it in his upper coat pocket so that the edges peeked out.’
    • ‘He reaches over, takes my hand, and I just squeeze my eyes tight and try not to hold on too hard.’
    • ‘When she looked up at him he placed a fresh smile upon his lips and reached out to take her hand.’
    • ‘I reached my good arm up to Alexei and he took my hand, clutching it reassuringly.’
    • ‘She reached out and took my hand.’
    • ‘She reached over, took the black brush and started to brush her long, silky hair.’
    • ‘My mother was reaching out and nervously taking Zachary's hand after my father had released grip of it.’
    • ‘Devon's blue eyes softened almost immediately and he leaned forward to take my hand from my lap.’
    • ‘Ariane smiled taking the reins, reaching over she planted a kiss on the old man's cheek.’
    • ‘Ben reached across and took her hand and placed it upon the gear and maneuvered it to change it to reverse.’
    • ‘As she reached over to take my tray, she frowned then squinted at a glinting object in the seat in front of me.’
    • ‘He held out his hand to her and she gnawed on her lip as she reached out and took the extended limb.’
    • ‘She reached out and took his wrist, holding it in place as she wrote her phone number on the back of his hand.’
    • ‘Slowly the girl reached out and took the bowl and started to drink from the rim.’
    lay hold of, take hold of, get hold of, get into one's hands
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Capture or gain possession of by force or military means.
      ‘twenty of their ships were sunk or taken’
      ‘the French took Ghent’
      • ‘After the German armies took Prague, Hájek was forced to work for the German armament industry.’
      • ‘In November 1919 Kiev was briefly taken by the White armies before being occupied by the Red Army.’
      • ‘Henry Joy McCracken's United Army of Ulster took Larne and Antrim but was defeated.’
      • ‘If, in addition, Russia takes Galicia, an early bath for Austria is on the cards.’
      • ‘He had already taken Cologne, where he was reputed to have massacred 11,000 virgins.’
      • ‘He had himself proclaimed king at Ravenna in 494 after taking back Italy from Odoacer.’
      • ‘The victims had been removed from a hospital by members of a Yugoslav army force which had taken Vukovar.’
      • ‘In May 1940 German forces invaded France and had taken Paris by the middle of June.’
      • ‘In fact, the failure of the German army to take Paris was seen as a failure and Moltke was held responsible.’
      • ‘The Soviet forces took more than 30,000 Romanian prisoners and all their equipment.’
      capture, seize, catch, take captive, arrest, apprehend, take into custody
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 (in bridge, whist, and similar card games) win (a trick)
      ‘West leads a club enabling his partner to take three tricks in the suit’
      • ‘If the declarer succeeds in taking no tricks, the defenders are not penalized.’
      • ‘Next, if declarer has taken fewer than 6 tricks he pays a penalty of 20 units to the pot.’
      • ‘The last trick, taken by West, is irrelevant because it contains no point cards.’
      • ‘However, some play that the declarer who takes 8 or more tricks wins nothing at all.’
      • ‘Sometimes there is bidding to determine the number of tricks to be taken.’
    3. 1.3Chess Capture (an opposing piece or pawn)
      ‘Black takes the rook with his bishop’
      • ‘If the black king takes the rook, black loses the queen.’
    4. 1.4 Dismiss a batsman from (his wicket)
      ‘he took seven wickets in the second innings’
      • ‘In the reply Spring View were dismissed for 159 with professional Jon Fielding taking seven wickets.’
      • ‘Have the rival captains ever taken each other's wicket in the same Test?’
      • ‘He took Bradman's wicket on five of the 13 occasions it fell in Tests when they both played.’
      • ‘I see that Shane Warne has taken more wickets in Tests than in other first-class matches.’
      • ‘It was the sixth time in eight innings that he has taken Lara's wicket.’
    5. 1.5 Dispossess someone of (something); steal or illicitly remove.
      ‘someone must have sneaked in here and taken it’
      • ‘It was only after he left that his victim realised her money had been taken.’
      • ‘She looked around for the horses, but the highwaymen had obviously taken them.’
      • ‘Nothing was stolen from the shop and nothing was taken from Mr Hussain.’
      • ‘There always has to be somebody in the tent to prevent thieves from taking the paltry property they have left.’
      • ‘They had a conversation with him and he later discovered that the money had been taken.’
      • ‘Auditors were called in, but the true amount of money taken by Lucas could not be fully determined.’
      • ‘To this date every item that has been stolen was taken from the dwelling of the owner.’
      • ‘It is alleged that nearly £18,000 was taken in the raid when two members of staff were injured.’
      • ‘People using cash machines are being warned to be on the alert, after four customers had their cash cards taken.’
      • ‘Crimes such as taking something from the office or asking a friend to bend the rules might involve only minor damage, but set up a vicious cycle.’
      • ‘The third unvirtuous action of the body is stealing, which means taking something that does not belong to us.’
      • ‘Anse blesses and resents Addie for dying, and then takes Dewey Dell's money and leaves.’
      • ‘Of all things in the house he could have stolen, he'd taken nothing more than a picture of her.’
      • ‘Alarms can deter thieves from not only stealing your van, but also taking items from within it.’
      • ‘He didn't say whether any money had been taken but he said that he was not hurt.’
      • ‘The theft was the third at the shop in the space of only eight weeks, although it is the first in which actual shop stock has been taken.’
      • ‘Bint also admitted using a credit card taken from an elderly man in Hemel Hempstead Hospital who has since died.’
      • ‘Jack is a thief, he takes one card from the top of your opponent's deck and adds it to your hand.’
      • ‘Sections of the churchyard and a whole path were dug up and stones taken in the last two years in six separate raids.’
      • ‘Two-thirds of the 282 light commercial vehicles under three years old stolen between November 2001 and November 2002 were taken with their keys.’
      steal, remove, appropriate, misappropriate, make off with, pilfer, purloin, abstract, dispossess someone of
      View synonyms
    6. 1.6 Occupy (a place or position)
      ‘we found that all the seats were taken’
      • ‘When it arises as the first branch, it takes the place usually occupied by the brachiocephalic.’
      • ‘Just as the show was about to begin the two vacant seats beside me were suddenly taken.’
      • ‘She takes her seat and steals a brief glance at the magnificent view to her side.’
      • ‘So this was the seat that I took, next to the aisle, and a man was sitting next to me.’
      • ‘I presented my paper at the first session and, relieved it was over, took the nearest free seat.’
      • ‘The council meeting takes off as the Mayor clad in ceremonial attire takes the high backed chair on the dais at the stroke of the bell.’
      • ‘Lone riders can walk straight to the front of the queue and take the first available seats.’
      • ‘While my brother took the first seat, he would occupy the last one, sandwiching me between both of them.’
      occupy, use, utilize, fill, hold
      sit down, sit, seat oneself, settle, settle oneself, install oneself, plant oneself, ensconce oneself, plump oneself down, plop oneself down
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    7. 1.7 Rent (a house)
      ‘they decided to take a small house in the country’
      • ‘After Nelson's victory at Copenhagen, she considered taking a London house again but feared the expense.’
      rent, lease, hire, charter
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    8. 1.8 Agree to buy (an item)
      ‘I'll take the one on the end’
      • ‘He has agreed to take a total of 48 and they are currently arriving in batches.’
    9. 1.9be takenhumorous (of a person) already be married or in an emotional relationship.
      • ‘I lost my chance at that and every good looking guy here is already taken.’
      • ‘But the idea of hugging a man who was already taken was a bad idea to her so she didn't hug him.’
    10. 1.10in imperative Use or have ready to use.
      ‘take half the marzipan and roll out’
      • ‘Take half the sugar, half the cream and half the butter and combine with the dark chocolate in a good, thick-bottomed pan.’
      • ‘My father would take a knife, reach up and disembowel the animal with a few flicks of his wrist.’
      • ‘Perhaps take a very tiny amount of the ashes and sprinkle it in kitty's food or water.’
    11. 1.11usually in imperative Use as an instance or example in support of an argument.
      ‘let's take Napoleon, for instance’
      • ‘It takes for example over 80-90 years for an Oak tree to become large enough to be useful.’
      • ‘For instance, take the other day when I call Pebbles in Spain and her mom picks up the phone.’
      • ‘Just take for example, you and I were at a party and we had a bit of an argument and it got a little bit out of hand.’
      • ‘Let us take Far Cry for example - a game that uses the Split Frame Rendering technique.’
      • ‘If we take Baghdad as an example, there was incredible chaos after the war.’
      • ‘Some of the stuff they do must actually hurt, take for example the Hardy Boys.’
      • ‘Another example we might take is the fact that human beings have hearts on the left of their bodies.’
      • ‘Now if you take the County games, the Aborigines were beaten in most of those, if not all.’
      • ‘To take only one example, the CWI used Youth Against Racism in Europe in much the same way.’
      consider, ponder, contemplate, think about, weigh up, give thought to, mull over, deliberate over, examine, study, cogitate about, chew over, meditate over, ruminate over
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    12. 1.12British Regularly buy or subscribe to (a particular newspaper or periodical).
      • ‘I took the magazine for a year but did not renew it.’
      subscribe to, pay a subscription to, buy regularly, read regularly, read every day, read every month, read every week
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    13. 1.13 Ascertain by measurement or observation.
      ‘the nurse takes my blood pressure’
      • ‘The nurse takes the child's vital signs and assesses his or her oral cavity for any excessive bleeding.’
      • ‘It appears that measurements had been taken but not submitted at the previous hearing.’
      • ‘She said Miss Ofuri was behaving belligerently and refused to allow her blood pressure to be taken.’
      • ‘Mr Murphy said they agreed it was a nuisance and were due to return to take further measurements.’
      ascertain, determine, establish, measure, find out, discover
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    14. 1.14 Write down.
      ‘he was taking notes’
      • ‘In an ideal world it would also link to the collaborative Hydra notes that were taken for pretty much every session.’
      • ‘I have a set of notes that I took when I went to see a Maxwell Bates exhibit on Thursday.’
      • ‘Christopher Hitchens may have learned shorthand and taken better notes than the rest of us, but I doubt it.’
      • ‘Kathy took a few more notes before watching the interviews from the back of the room.’
      • ‘By taking notes he wanted Sydney to write down all the important parts and help him make a decision.’
      • ‘He relied on what volumes he could get and the notes he had taken on the books he had read.’
      • ‘He will have watched Celtic play under Dalglish and will have taken enough notes to fill a book on their style of play.’
      • ‘Either his friend had been taking notes these past several months, or he was a fast learner.’
      • ‘Notes taken at the time were incomplete and a summary of the interview was drawn up only afterwards.’
      write, note, note down, make a note of, set down, jot, jot down, scribble, scrawl, take down, record, register, document, minute, put in writing, commit to paper
      View synonyms
    15. 1.15 Make (a photograph) with a camera.
      ‘he stopped to take a snap’
      • ‘After the engagement, Basharat had taken some photographs and video clips of the girl.’
      • ‘I took the cheapo digital camera with me, but to be honest - you don't wanna see this place.’
      • ‘Financial help can be given in some cases to assist a visit with us, and photographs can be taken for those unable to travel.’
      • ‘The Canon photo management software creates one new directory for each day photographs have been taken.’
      • ‘In police custody, his solicitors came with a digital camera and took nineteen photographs of his injuries.’
      • ‘A hidden camera secretly takes a close-up photo of the shopper's face.’
      • ‘This is about artists, and how an artist can be stopped now from taking a photograph.’
      • ‘I raised my camera to take a photograph of this to send to Midland Mainline.’
      • ‘Incidentally, the camera allows us to take snapshots while it is recording a video.’
      • ‘A tube poster featuring this caught my eye, because I recently took a very similar photograph.’
      • ‘As an additional safeguard, the firearm also contains a tiny camera which takes a photograph every time it is fired.’
      • ‘There is a chance of winning a digital camera for taking the photograph which best captures the spirit of the challenge.’
      • ‘Camera control also takes some getting used to but after a while I found it intuitive.’
      • ‘These works, taken by just four photographers, recall the most dazzling time in movie history.’
      • ‘I explained it was a camera and I was taking photographs of what had been going on on the estate.’
      • ‘These are select photographs from the newspaper that have been taken from different angles.’
      • ‘Unfortunately, we could not stop to take photographs as the bus raced past the scenes.’
      • ‘If clear photographs can be taken, then an efficient counting system is in place.’
      • ‘In 1945 she was photographed taking a leisurely, long-overdue bath in Hitler's tub.’
      • ‘Mo came round today with her digital camera and took a photograph of what will probably be my image on the publicity.’
    16. 1.16 (especially of illness) suddenly strike or afflict (someone)
      ‘mum's been taken bad’
      • ‘Garret Westerfield was taken with a seizure or fit.’
    17. 1.17 Have sexual intercourse with.
      • ‘He took her violently and they shook and trembled as they came together.’
  • 2 Remove (someone or something) from a particular place.

    ‘he took an envelope from his inside pocket’
    ‘the police took him away’
    • ‘I reached over and took a bottle of milk from its bag and gently put it in its mouth.’
    • ‘This is not just water but water taken from the algae-green trough in the field.’
    • ‘Kellye's son, Bryce, was 17; she'd taken him out of high school the previous year to homeschool him after catching him smoking pot.’
    • ‘The debris taken from the pool is visible to all on the northern bank of the pool.’
    • ‘They then inserted an extra bovine protein gene taken from a cow cell into the embryos.’
    • ‘Silver took out a key and locked the door, ensuring that the boy couldn't escape.’
    • ‘It's like the Daily Star with all the news and sport taken out, only rather less highbrow.’
    • ‘Blood taken from a donor will tend to coagulate rapidly unless it is mixed with an anticoagulant.’
    • ‘The substance freshly taken from the honeycomb has a distinctive taste, scent, texture, and so on.’
    • ‘He reaches out and takes the pins from her hair, so it loosens in sections, unfolding around her.’
    • ‘He reached out and took the bag from her, turning it so the pills dropped in his hand.’
    • ‘Much of the excellent seafood taken from coastal waters is salted and dried and sent inland.’
    • ‘I am a big fainter when it comes to getting blood taken from me, so this was just ick ick ick.’
    • ‘Stagecoach staff managed to stop him driving off and the police came to take him away in a van.’
    • ‘Don Broder took it from his brother in 1973 and kept it mounted it on the wall of his family room.’
    • ‘Her husband Stephen had died four years earlier and she fought a long legal battle to use sperm taken from him before he died.’
    • ‘The animals will be taken from a national park in Gujarat and released in the forests of Etawah.’
    • ‘Fluid taken from Mr Wilson's lung contained traces of blood, sometimes evidence of cancer.’
    • ‘Travis reached up and took the flower from my mouth and dropped it on the floor carelessly.’
    • ‘What would happen if everyone took his or her money out of the bank at the same time?’
    remove, pull, draw, withdraw, extract, fish
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 Subtract.
      ‘take two from ten’
      ‘add the numbers together and take away five’
      • ‘Take two from four, how many are left?’
      • ‘I have eighteen cents and take away five cents to buy a 'scratch-book,' and have thirteen.’
      subtract, deduct, remove, take away, take off
      View synonyms
  • 3 Carry or bring with one; convey.

    ‘he took along a portfolio of his drawings’
    ‘the drive takes you through some wonderful scenery’
    with two objects ‘I took him a letter’
    • ‘She went there on the day she took her Housing Benefit form and she asked for a change in circumstances form.’
    • ‘Ed's job often takes him to Manchester and London and he has noticed how fashion works in the city and has been shopping for a more modern look in Kendal.’
    • ‘His remains will be taken home for burial in Kilconduff Cemetery after Requiem Mass.’
    • ‘His job routinely takes him to Minnesota, London, Munich, the Netherlands and New York.’
    • ‘No matter where his mission takes him, he'll never be beyond the reach of God's protection.’
    • ‘It was now early evening and I decided that the next lift I accepted would have to take me quite a distance.’
    • ‘She was taken to a police car and then up to Bradford Royal Infirmary.’
    • ‘However, King Scallops collected from the area must still be taken to an approved plant for processing.’
    • ‘An ambulance was called and Mr Greally was taken to York Hospital and later transferred to Leeds.’
    • ‘The woman was taken to hospital and received treatment for a minor head injury.’
    • ‘Her job took her to New Delhi, London and finally to Chennai, where she had always wanted to be.’
    • ‘He took the ball forward only to fall but McKinnon was well - placed to flick it past keeper Nicky Walker.’
    • ‘After spending time living in Harrow, her job took her to Tokyo where she met her husband Shigetoshi.’
    • ‘The next morning, the yacht had already been taken to the repair yard.’
    • ‘Once the phone is charged, it can be taken anywhere inside the house as with a cordless phone.’
    • ‘Donations of items to sell can be taken along, or if they are too large call in to arrange collection.’
    • ‘The injured were taken to City Road Hospital, lately home to the great Dalrymple.’
    • ‘Any items for the sale can be taken to the club or the Wiltshire Times offices in Duke Street.’
    • ‘They should be taken into the house about the beginning of November and wintered on hay and a few turnips at each end of the day.’
    • ‘Walsh took the ball forward and off loaded to Coulter who had made a blistering run before firing over.’
    bring, carry, bear, transport, convey, move, transfer, shift, haul, drag, lug, cart, ferry
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    1. 3.1 Accompany or guide (someone) to a specified place.
      ‘I'll take you to your room’
      • ‘Our guides then took us to a creek that was said to be one of the hardest in Norway.’
      • ‘Police were sent to the house and Berry was taken to her grandma's by officers.’
      • ‘Upon arriving home from work on Friday, I discovered that my wife had taken Zachery out for dinner and shopping, giving me a quiet house and no dinner company.’
      • ‘My task was to take him for a spin and let him cast his expert eye over my driving skills… or lack of them.’
      • ‘Reyna Johnson, nice girl extraordinaire, had accepted his offer to take her to homecoming.’
      • ‘We exited the lift and were taken through a pitch dark passage into a room full of cages where a strange lady talked to us.’
      • ‘Each week we will pull out the name of a winner who will receive a voucher to take their friends or family for a meal at Chicago Rock.’
      • ‘If anyone rich reads this, can they please bung me some money so I can take her away for a short holiday?’
      • ‘I had taken Katie out to dinner and we had a really nice time.’
      • ‘We took Lucy along because Dad loves to see her and tries in vain to get her to play fetch the ball.’
      • ‘He also takes Bury Gateway Club members away on adventure weekends every year.’
      • ‘One of her chores was taking the family's horses out to pasture, within view of the house.’
      • ‘Mom was at my sister's house and had to be taken home to prepare a room for Marie.’
      • ‘This morning I went to take Penelope shopping but she was not at all up for it.’
      • ‘Some parents will get in touch with the service to let them know where their children are to be taken that night.’
      • ‘His mother was a devoted Buddhist and she took Teiji, when he was a young child, with her when she went to the temple.’
      • ‘We believe Sims was waiting for her near the house and took her away to a green area at the back of the house.’
      • ‘His guide took him to visit a forest tribe said to have stopped eating human flesh only five years previously.’
      • ‘Later the guide takes us to a souvenir shop run by a friend of his.’
      • ‘Once you know what is expected, go shopping but take somebody you trust with you.’
      escort, accompany, help, assist, show, lead, show someone the way, lead the way, conduct, guide, see, usher, steer, pilot, shepherd, convey
      View synonyms
    2. 3.2 Bring into a specified state.
      ‘the invasion took Europe to the brink of war’
      • ‘The law also could make some boards more cautious about agreeing to take a company private.’
      • ‘They have ridden out the troubles once before and they are determined to do the same again, but this time by taking City into Division Two.’
      • ‘When Craig Waters makes his statement, we will be taking that live, so stand by for that.’
      • ‘A riveting, Hindi-filmi court case takes the story towards a brilliant finale.’
      • ‘Focused massage itself induces a meditative state in the giver as well as the receiver, taking brain wave patterns into alpha.’
      • ‘The Nazi regime had taken Germany to war in 1939 and Siegel felt that he could no longer remain in his native land.’
      • ‘Campbell was not the first, then, but he was very good at his job and he took the art of spin to new heights, in Britain, at least.’
      • ‘Tony Blair refuses to accept responsibility for taking us to war on a pack of lies.’
      • ‘Road to Rome takes Battlefield to the next level, with extremely well designed levels.’
      • ‘He takes the Dingwall club from division three to division one in his six-year tenure.’
      • ‘She has a tough job taking Standard Life into profit and holding onto customers that have begun to drift away.’
      • ‘These goals need to be met without taking large additional amounts of land into agricultural use.’
      • ‘Nothing would give me greater pleasure than to see George Street being taken to new heights.’
      • ‘Fowler was seen as the man to take City upwards and onwards in the next four years.’
      • ‘In spite of a spirited comeback that took Tan to within three points, she held on to win comfortably.’
      • ‘We wanted to take Park & Ride to the next level and we are delighted they are coming.’
    3. 3.3 Use as a route or a means of transport.
      ‘take the A43 towards Bicester’
      ‘we took the night train to Scotland’
      • ‘So we're taking a rather circuitous route to Waterloo so I can pick them up.’
      • ‘Unlike the meandering trip into the desert, the return journey takes the most direct route home.’
      • ‘Knowing what the trains are like I deliberately took an earlier train, only to have it run perfectly on time.’
      • ‘On the way home, he argued with the taxi driver about the route he was taking and the price of the fare.’
      • ‘We've now worked out the route they took - one went over his fence, and let the other in by the gate.’
      • ‘If not we can expect even more commercial vehicles taking the shortest route through.’
      • ‘Each and every minute detail was worked out as to which car would enter first and which escape routes we should be taking.’
      • ‘Schoolchildren were instead taking a longer route via Leigh Road and Chestnut Avenue.’
      • ‘They take the shortest possible route but do not know the height of their vehicle.’
      • ‘Now the route Les took from the dock to a waiting prison van will be part of a tour on an open day at the courthouse in Bexley Square.’
      • ‘Mr Langdale asked why he was unable to say exactly which route he had taken.’
      • ‘She wanted to approach Genevieve's by the route she had always taken in the past.’
      • ‘We took a First ScotRail train, which has a picturesque route, from Edinburgh to Dunkeld.’
      • ‘The route he took was popular with tourists but regarded by locals as treacherous.’
      • ‘We decided on a walk, and thought why not do a real walk, and decided on the route we are taking.’
      • ‘If you only want to get there, you take the quickest route and worry about nothing else.’
      • ‘Without a doubt, this was the most luxurious form of transport I have ever taken.’
      • ‘The youth had been out for the evening in Kingston with friends and had taken the N285 night bus home.’
      • ‘It had taken them just about two days to get there taking the most direct route possible.’
      • ‘They took my 1996 route to the pub, I beat them with my new one, and we had a nice drink in the sunshine.’
      travel on, travel by, journey on, go via
      View synonyms
  • 4Accept or receive (someone or something)

    ‘she was advised to take any job offered’
    ‘they don't take children’
    • ‘Bookings for travel to the forthcoming games at Coventry and Nottingham Forest are still begin taken.’
    • ‘Names will be taken from those who intend travelling on next year's pilgrimage to Lourdes.’
    • ‘Barry is torn between kicking out the man who is about to despoil his daughter and taking his much needed rent money.’
    • ‘If they offered you the Irish manager's job would you take it, I ask mischievously.’
    • ‘This way, students will not be wasting their number one rankings on jobs that are already taken.’
    • ‘They have already taken a Government assurance when they provided the information.’
    • ‘Boris should have never agreed to take the call or do the show if it required taking that call.’
    • ‘A lump sum is only achievable by taking a lower pension as a result, literally cashing in part of your retirement income.’
    • ‘He found his dyslexia made it difficult to get a job and took a string of short-term posts.’
    • ‘Names are now being taken so if interested book a place as soon as possible.’
    • ‘Initially he took a teaching position at a Latin school in Enkhuizen, North Holland.’
    • ‘Names are being taken for anyone interested in joining the Mosse brownie pack.’
    • ‘Applications are currently being taken for the new course about to start in September.’
    • ‘With an ever increasing demand for places, names are now being taken for the new year in September.’
    • ‘Orders are now being taken for all sizes and are available in navy blue and black.’
    • ‘No away shirts are with the club at the moment but orders in all sizes are being taken.’
    • ‘We readily accepted, and took delivery of the pilot showreel the next day for an internal focus group.’
    • ‘McCarthy is a good manager, in my opinion, much better now that when he took the job six years ago.’
    • ‘Crucial is currently quoting as below, with a ten per cent discount for orders taken online.’
    • ‘Each year City of York Council asks schools if the number of new children they are taking each year is acceptable.’
    accept, take up, take on, undertake
    receive, obtain, gain, get, acquire, collect, accept, be given, be presented with, be awarded, have conferred on one
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    1. 4.1 Understand or accept as valid.
      ‘I take your point’
      • ‘I take your point, and agree somewhat, but disagree somewhat.’
      understand, grasp, get, comprehend, apprehend, see, follow, take in
      View synonyms
    2. 4.2 Acquire or assume (a position, state, or form)
      ‘teaching methods will take various forms’
      ‘he took office in September’
      • ‘Not that The Sun is in a position to take the moral high ground on anything.’
      • ‘If he follows the statements he has made in the past, he would be taking a far different position.’
      • ‘She and Pa took a steamboat to Greenwich, where she married her love, who had taken the name Rokesmith.’
      • ‘With that the ascent was started - initially Rich leading and then myself taking the poll position.’
      • ‘Trojans soon steadied the ship and took a seventh minute lead through top scorer Gareth Goodison.’
      • ‘The modern world takes a strangely ambiguous position on violence.’
      • ‘As he took his Sedgefield seat in 1983, he looked across the House for lessons in leadership.’
      • ‘If the call takes a sudden emotional or personal turn, get up quietly and signal that you are going out to the waiting room.’
      • ‘It may be that he is right, but I believe he is taking an overly materialistic position.’
      • ‘They took a seventh minute lead with Steve Foster's tap in from Martyn Forrest's cross.’
      • ‘The problem with taking the ideologically pure position is that although what the state does will be bad it may not lead to collapse.’
      • ‘In taking this position Giddens comes close to American philosopher Richard Rorty.’
      • ‘It had all begun very promisingly for Trojans as they almost took a first minute lead.’
      • ‘By mutual consent the couple divorced after a son was born and she took the name Bulbul Abdel Magid.’
      • ‘Another form luxury fever takes is the appearance of premium versions of everyday products.’
      • ‘In a fast and attacking game it was King William who took a fifth minute lead through an own goal.’
      • ‘The only league game played was in division three where Hemingbrough took a fourth minute lead through Ward.’
      • ‘In any case, Coyle's men did take a first minute lead with Dens defender Bobby Mann at fault.’
      • ‘The witness did not, however, condescend to describe the form the cut tobacco took.’
      • ‘With the wind, Pocklington took a seventh minute lead through Kevin Bowling's long penalty.’
      derive, draw, acquire, obtain, get, gain, extract, procure
      View synonyms
    3. 4.3 Receive (a specified amount of money) as payment or earnings.
      ‘on its first day of trading the shop took 1.6 million roubles’
      • ‘That means that the government spends less money than it takes in and applies the surplus to the NIB.’
      • ‘It means they can respond quickly to calls, and drivers can take more money with fewer dead miles between jobs.’
      • ‘What would you say if I told you that the video game industry takes in more money per year than the movie entertainment business?’
    4. 4.4 Achieve or attain (a victory or result)
      ‘John Martin took the men's title’
      • ‘Fairweather arrived last season when they foiled Albion's clean sweep by taking the District Cup.’
      • ‘It was a question of persistence paying off for Andrew Peach who took the Programme Presenter award.’
      • ‘BBC News took the News award for a second time, the only news organisation ever to do so.’
      • ‘No Republican president has ever made it to the White House without taking Ohio.’
      • ‘They can take the two seats if they overcome the risk of dragging each other down.’
      • ‘Second and third places were taken by, respectively, the Dusit Resort and The City Sriracha.’
      • ‘William Hurt took best supporting actor for his role in A History of Violence.’
      • ‘Kerry hoped to add to his total with a win in New Hampshire, which Bush barely took in the last election.’
      • ‘Both campaigns believe that whoever wins two out of the three will probably take the White House.’
      • ‘No Republican has ever won the White House without taking Ohio; Democrats have only done so twice.’
      • ‘So I'm backing the Red Socks to beat the St Louis Cardinals and take the World Series title.’
      • ‘Andrus Varnik from Estonia took the silver after reaching 85.17m at his first attempt.’
      get, secure, obtain, acquire
      View synonyms
    5. 4.5 Act on (an opportunity)
      ‘he took his chance to get out while the house was quiet’
      • ‘When she looks over at me, Gregory takes the opportunity to reach out and grab her wrist.’
      • ‘My good friend has taken a rather splendid opportunity at work.’
      • ‘The manager came in and said it was disappointing but it was a case of Crewe taking their chances and we didn't.’
      • ‘For Oxford is a place of seemingly endless opportunities that should be taken and not put off for the sake of your degree.’
      • ‘Of course, it also takes the opportunity to receive digital instructions as to how and when to attack its human master.’
      • ‘The steed stopped, and took the opportunity to reach down and grab a quick breakfast.’
      • ‘He accepted the challenge and took his chances and the shots went in.’
      act on, take advantage of, capitalize on, use, exploit, make the most of, leap at, jump on, pounce on, seize, seize on, grasp, grab, snatch, accept, put to advantage, profit from, turn to account, cash in on
      View synonyms
    6. 4.6 Experience or be affected by.
      ‘the lad took a savage beating’
      • ‘But the slight decline in revenue is good news compared to the loss Sun took in the quarter.’
      • ‘Jim also took a keen interest in political affairs and loved the atmosphere of election week and count day.’
      • ‘For someone purporting to live in Cumbria he takes a very keen interest in our city…’
      • ‘Long takes a particularly keen interest in developing junior players and has run classes after school and in the holidays.’
      • ‘He took pride in a job well done and always gave full commitment to any job he undertook.’
      • ‘He has not stopped scoring since and all this after taking a 75 per cent pay cut when he moved to Hanover.’
      • ‘A regular visitor to Mayo, he takes a very keen interest in GAA affairs in this county.’
      • ‘To answer the first question we have to ask ourselves who actually takes offence at receiving Christmas cards?’
      • ‘As if spurred on by this, Peebles upped the ante, taking two consecutive strikes against the head.’
      • ‘Scots should take a very keen interest in what happens in our prisons for two reasons, he says.’
    7. 4.7with object and adverbial React to or regard (news or an event) in a specified way.
      ‘she took the news well’
      ‘everything you say, he takes it the wrong way’
      • ‘Those of us with a cynical bent can all too well imagine how this proposal is being taken in the White House.’
      • ‘Defeat was taken with dignity.’
      • ‘Judging by fans who spoke to the newspaper, the news is not being taken well.’
      receive, respond to, react to, meet, greet
      View synonyms
    8. 4.8with object and adverbial Deal with (a physical obstacle or course) in a specified way.
      ‘he takes the corners with no concern for his own safety’
      • ‘And then the K1200S takes the corners, like no other bike I’ve ridden.’
    9. 4.9 Regard or view in a specified way.
      ‘he somehow took it as a personal insult’
      with object and infinitive ‘I fell over what I took to be a heavy branch’
      • ‘Seen from a distance, such armed bands were often taken for brigands themselves, and so the panic spread.’
      • ‘All the girls in the office had taken this to mean that I was devastatingly handsome.’
      • ‘I suggest, however, that statements like these should not be taken too literally.’
      • ‘The Bible was taken as literal truth, despite the acceptance by most that the Earth revolved around the sun.’
      • ‘So it's a very difficult role, very difficult job and they're taking it very seriously.’
      • ‘This should not be taken to mean that military intervention is necessarily illegitimate.’
      • ‘I can tell it's his way of being nice so I take it as a compliment.’
      • ‘I'd advice you take everything I write with a pinch of salt anyway, so to speak.’
      • ‘The article was most certainly not intended to be taken as the sum total or even a summation of my feelings about the CU.’
      • ‘Don't take anything that Gibson wrote about as gospel on what Voudoun is about.’
      • ‘He said attacks on shop staff could be taken more seriously at Government level.’
      • ‘They know who she is and there is no question as to whether she should be taken seriously.’
      • ‘Take some time to regain confidence after this - or should I take it as a compliment?’
      • ‘Though Jeter takes acting seriously, Krakowski says he knows how to have fun with an audience.’
      • ‘Im not quite sure who they are but I take it as a compliment that they liked my site enough to copy parts of it.’
      • ‘It was a bold move but Bohr's already high reputation meant that he would be taken seriously.’
      • ‘The BBC, reporting the event, took this as a reference to the Cardinal's red hat and robes.’
      • ‘At first glance, Shannon looks apathetic but an emotion that could be taken for concern flickers in her eyes.’
      • ‘For Sirius this occurs in July and this was taken to be the start of the year.’
      • ‘The cholesterol ratio should not be taken on its own as a predictor of the risk of heart attack or stroke.’
      regard as, consider to be, view as, look on as, see as, believe to be, think of as, reckon to be, imagine to be, deem to be, hold to be, judge to be
      View synonyms
    10. 4.10be taken by/with Be attracted or charmed by.
      ‘Billie was very taken with him’
      • ‘Pluto, or Hades, rules the underworld but even he was taken by the power of love and lust, for Proserpine.’
      • ‘While enjoying his new life, Barich is taken by the Irish love of National Hunt racing.’
      • ‘One interesting thing: they were taken with the quotation of Keith Johnstone in the Guardian yesterday by Chris Goode, to the effect that our present taboos are benevolence and tenderness.’
      • ‘And I have been taken with how Best Mate's triumph has captured the imagination of people who are not interested in racing, but are interested in sport.’
      • ‘Peter McDonnell fundraises for charity every year and he and Caroline Boyle, who is a practice nurse in Killala, were taken with the idea of the Western People's Slimathon.’
      • ‘We found we were suddenly quite taken by the emotion of working together again, like an old couple who meet once more.’
      • ‘Frontiersmen were taken with the extent to which Native Americans enjoyed freedom as individuals.’
      • ‘There were two students at that class I was taken with, one a girl and one a guy.’
      • ‘Elter is taken with the action of Love's Labours Lost, wherein a group of nobles swear off wine, women, and all pleasure in order to pursue their studies.’
      • ‘Two of them were boys, the one Pip seemed taken with and one he had been standing with.’
      • ‘Roger doesn't notice this, but is taken with how much Carolyn wants to keep David around.’
      • ‘I know Dad loves to see Lucy and I'm sure will be taken with Harvey when he finds out he fetches his toys back when you throw them for him.’
      captivate, enchant, charm, delight, attract, win over, fascinate, bewitch, beguile, enthral, entrance, lure, infatuate, seduce, dazzle, hypnotize, mesmerize
      View synonyms
    11. 4.11 Submit to, tolerate, or endure.
      ‘they refused to take it any more’
      ‘some people found her hard to take’
      • ‘She was so sucked into her own lies she took the abuse and accepted it as a way of life.’
      • ‘They can usually take what Mother Nature dishes out.’
      • ‘I have always advocated that players must stand up and take criticism and accept that.’
      • ‘It has been three years of patiently taking rejection, accepting smaller parts, non-speaking roles.’
      • ‘It was a moving and impassioned speech, with a few barbs which Blair had to simply stand there and take.’
      • ‘They were prepared to stand there and take what they were given by the police.’
      endure, bear, suffer, tolerate, stand, put up with, stomach, brook, abide, carry, submit to, accept, permit, allow, admit, countenance, support, shoulder
      View synonyms
    12. 4.12take itwith clause Assume.
      ‘I take it that someone is coming to meet you’
      • ‘By now, I take it, the rhythm method of contraception must have passed out of favour.’
      • ‘The key point, I take it from The Economist, is that a leadership change lies ahead in China.’
      • ‘What I take it to refer to is the various roles of fire: to lighten, to heat and to destroy.’
      • ‘These are, I take it, all referees below the Panel and those who officiate countrywide at some 2,000 games a week.’
      • ‘Yes, but do I take it that ACPO does not have a specific view about where it thinks it would be best served?’
      • ‘From your article I take it that the person quoted is a local solicitor who, for some reason, could not be named.’
      • ‘Can I take it then oxygen will be provided in these new circumstances?’
      • ‘So I take it that is not a major concern of yours, that U.S. troops might be caught up in a civil war.’
      • ‘Fair enough, but I take it that they are not coming just for a day out at MacDonalds.’
      • ‘Can I take it that you felt you had assumed a huge responsibility in taking on this awesome story?’
      • ‘So I take it, you're going to catch up now with the prime minister and then head back to Israel.’
      • ‘In this particular case, in London, I take it, none of these guys left any indication.’
      • ‘There may be a case to do so if the father was very poor and needed the money to survive with his son, but I take it that this is not so in this case.’
      • ‘So I take it that Labour will support this bill so that the police don't have to exercise that discretion.’
      • ‘Do I take it from that that you have not got powers of enforcement of any decision that you feel is appropriate?’
      • ‘By rediscuss, I take it to mean that we're discussing what the salary & benefits would be.’
      • ‘Do I take it then that Boris supports the repeal of devolution in Scotland & Wales?’
      • ‘No more details yet, I take it, on when he might be got out of Iraq or when, indeed, he might come back to Australia?’
      • ‘So do I take it that at the launch of the Virdi inquiry very much that training was in vogue but now it has filtered off, or dwindled off?’
      • ‘Michael, can I take it from your review last week that you wouldn't recommend the Crabwall Manor hotel?’
      assume, presume, suppose, imagine, expect, believe, reckon, think, be of the opinion, gather, dare say, trust, surmise, deduce, guess, conjecture, fancy, suspect
      View synonyms
  • 5Consume as food, drink, medicine, or drugs.

    ‘take an aspirin and lie down’
    • ‘It is taken by around two million people in the UK - in Germany, it's available on prescription.’
    • ‘The years roll by, and you continue to steal, take drugs, and carry and use a blade.’
    • ‘Currently insulin cannot be taken in a pill because the hormone is broken down by powerful acids in the stomach.’
    • ‘They work best when taken regularly from the time when either pain or bleeding starts or the day before a period is due.’
    • ‘While taking drugs he was, in effect, harming no one but himself whereas with the alcohol he was a danger to others.’
    • ‘Young drivers also appear willing to accept lifts from drivers they know to have taken illicit substances.’
    • ‘She would say that she wanted to get away from the life but the drugs she took controlled everything.’
    • ‘Her family insist authorities knew she and her boyfriend were taking drugs together.’
    • ‘When we arrived at the house, John took a good few pink tablets and drank whiskey and cans of cider.’
    • ‘Was he caught stealing, taking drugs or was he a victim of homosexual abuse?’
    • ‘He's a fascinating character, albeit a frustratingly incoherent one when the copious drugs he takes are in full flow.’
    • ‘Unfortunately these substances have been taken illicitly by athletes for body-building.’
    • ‘This comes down to your personal choice and drugs education, if you take these harder drugs.’
    • ‘Mr.A told us that he now realises the danger to himself if he does not continue to abstain from taking illicit drugs.’
    • ‘It is thought she and four other women who became ill on the night she died, had taken drugs stolen from a trolley.’
    • ‘For colitis and irritable bowel syndrome, aloe vera can be taken as a drink.’
    • ‘Young smokers are also more likely to drink alcohol or take illicit drugs.’
    • ‘If only the Army knew, some of their best soldiers in the battalion are taking or have taken drugs.’
    • ‘I would like to know what drugs he was taking, such was his endless energy throughout.’
    • ‘When he got caught taking other drugs they would increase his methadone script so that he didn't need any other drugs.’
    drink, imbibe
    View synonyms
  • 6Make, undertake, or perform (an action or task)

    ‘Lucy took a deep breath’
    ‘the key decisions are still to be taken’
    • ‘He seems to assume that it is the same group of bright kids across the board taking AP's.’
    • ‘It threatens that if money is not sent within days, steps will be taken to recover the money via the British courts.’
    • ‘Maybe the opposition players should be moved back, but the free kick still be taken from the same position?’
    • ‘However, no decisions have yet been taken about how this money should be allocated.’
    • ‘Key meetings were not recorded in official minutes and decisions were taken with little consultation of the Cabinet, says the report.’
    • ‘Mr Latham's mayoral decisions, including the capital works, were taken with the support of his council at the time.’
    • ‘I expected action to be taken against the club in the form of a heavy fine or ruled out of the competition.’
    • ‘If there's any action to be taken [by the club] you'll be the last to know.’
    • ‘So as I opened up a new packet of crayons for my son, I held them up to my nose and took a long deep breath.’
    • ‘Then they took a mock written driving test, which everyone tried his or her best in.’
    • ‘Reliable information indicated that even the staff of the department expressed their bewilderment at some decisions that were taken with respect to the event.’
    • ‘Nurse Debbie McCall has gone back to the job she loves after taking a career break of 18 years.’
    • ‘The book outlines simple steps that can be taken to maximise money and help reap the rewards in retirement.’
    • ‘I advanced to him that in understanding that we recognise that sometimes decisions have to be taken.’
    • ‘This is a prelude to the enforcement steps which can then be taken to compel payment of any arrears.’
    • ‘The decision to strike had been taken on Friday, 48 hours before the bombs fell on Afghanistan.’
    • ‘The decision to have a very fancy new building at the Holyrood site was taken by the Labour government.’
    • ‘The United Nations received much support for taking robust action against an aggressor nation.’
    • ‘You're taking a physical and mental break from your work area at least once a day.’
    • ‘The key stage three English test is the final key stage test, and is taken by 14-year-olds.’
    perform, execute, effect, discharge, carry out, accomplish, fulfil, complete, conduct, implement, do, make, have
    View synonyms
    1. 6.1 Conduct (a ceremony or gathering).
      • ‘Additionally, once you elect to take a meeting our online scheduling software eliminates the frustrations of e-mail and telephone.’
    2. 6.2 Be taught or examined in (a subject)
      ‘some degrees require a student to take a secondary subject’
      • ‘They took City and Guild courses in literacy, numeracy and personal skills.’
      • ‘Soon his confidence in theoretical physics was such that by the second semester he was taking all of Sommerfeld's courses.’
      • ‘These can be taken in place of subjects such as history, geography and modern languages.’
      • ‘Simply no dice, was the school's response, unless he agreed to take piano lessons too.’
      • ‘My boss will be taking a special course the first two weeks of July and I'll be in charge of the office, which is fine.’
      • ‘He is taking the A1 assessors course to become an assessor for candidates studying for NVQs in warehousing.’
      • ‘A week or so later I was booked to go for a weekend away somewhere with some people from a creative writing course I was taking.’
      • ‘Or dive even deeper by coming a day early and taking a Critical Concerns Course.’
      • ‘They were in medieval French, a subject she had never taken at school.’
      • ‘After taking the course Bob was able to assist a passenger experiencing difficulties.’
      • ‘If you have friends taking the same subject you could always have an informal chat about an aspect of the subject with your friends.’
      • ‘He needs to go back and read his classics studies, if he took that subject in high school.’
      • ‘The year 12 student, who takes clothing as a school subject, aims to fulfill a career in fashion design.’
      study, learn, be taught, have lessons in
      View synonyms
    3. 6.3British Obtain (an academic degree) after fulfilling the required conditions.
      ‘she took a degree in business studies’
      • ‘In order to take the higher degree they have to give up their existing job.’
      • ‘It first became an issue for Mr Dixon when he was taking a Fine Arts degree at Leeds Metropolitan University.’
  • 7Require or use up (a specified amount of time)

    ‘the jury took an hour and a half to find McPherson guilty’
    with two objects ‘it takes me about a quarter of an hour to walk to work’
    • ‘You just have to be organised and even if you just take one or two hours to bounce ideas off somebody else that can be important.’
    • ‘It took Inveraray an hour to equalise very much against the run of play.’
    • ‘However the scale of the damage means it could take another 72 hours before every service is back.’
    • ‘A jury at Exeter Crown Court took less than two hours to find him guilty.’
    • ‘It gets progressively more demanding, too, taking a good 12 hours of study to absorb.’
    • ‘It takes many, many hours to learn a new language and I just never seem to have even a few extra minutes to spare.’
    • ‘It took McMartin several more hours to scrape a tunnel in the earth beneath the concrete slab to rescue him.’
    • ‘To write each word it takes hours and it has taken Makardhawaja two years to complete two volumes.’
    • ‘The haircut takes just exactly the amount of time that I have on my car park ticket.’
    • ‘The jury took less than an hour to come to a unanimous decision - insane, unfit to plead.’
    • ‘It takes a good few hours to go through their system, however, so I haven't had a chance to play with all the fun features yet.’
    • ‘Driving or walking that short distance takes an almost equal amount of time.’
    • ‘They tied her to a chair and burnt her with petrol over a period of 24 hours, and it took her 12 days to die.’
    • ‘The jury took less than two hours to reach a verdict of not guilty of murder but guilty of manslaughter.’
    • ‘It takes about the same amount of time to post the links.’
    • ‘The jury took just over two hours to return a majority verdict of death by natural causes contributed by neglect.’
    • ‘It took Heather three hours to travel three miles through snow-blocked traffic.’
    • ‘The procedure is the same, takes the same amount of time, and the parts are cheaper.’
    • ‘Anyhow it took Jae over an hour to cut my hair as I went from having curls half way down my back to wearing it cropped like a boy.’
    • ‘His pleas fell on deaf ears as the jury took less than an hour to find him guilty.’
    last, continue for, go on for, carry on for, keep on for, run on for, endure for
    View synonyms
    1. 7.1 (of a task or situation) need or call for (a particular person or thing)
      ‘it will take an electronics expert to dismantle it’
      • ‘Post Office returned to winning ways against Haxby Town but it took a last minute penalty to settle it.’
      • ‘It seems like it takes a World Cup or an Olympic Games for this country to realise how far behind the rest of the sporting world we are.’
      • ‘You must get to the root of what it takes for you to get what you want.’
      • ‘It takes a 51 percent vote of the limited partners to approve a sale of this franchise.’
      • ‘All it takes is some kind of security sweep at his job for his past to be uncovered.’
      • ‘Reaching a final takes guts, but Dennis Wise's Lions did not enjoy a dramatic run full of victories against all odds.’
      • ‘This task takes time and energy - it should not be done in its entirety after a long day at work.’
      • ‘It takes little imagination to believe that there is in fact something more sinister in the Government's motives.’
      • ‘It takes a World War, diphtheria and blindness to sort it all out.’
      • ‘The problem is that a lot of people don't seem to understand what it takes for a good back and forth exchange.’
      • ‘Unfortunately it does take an Einstein to understand what you are entitled to.’
      • ‘All it takes is time, a place to gather, and enough money to photocopy fliers or put an ad in the local paper.’
      • ‘Of course, it takes vast amounts of money and effort to pull off a successful lunar mission.’
      • ‘To see complex systems of functional order as order, and not as chaos, takes understanding.’
      • ‘All it takes is a little brain bending and creativity to drum up an endless list of affordable dates.’
      • ‘Of course, this is not the whole story about why the violin takes such a lot of practice in order to learn to play it well.’
      • ‘It takes little imagination to understand just why so many ancient legends abound in these parts.’
      • ‘It usually takes building a friendship first but evidently not in this day and age.’
      • ‘And Carter agrees, It takes a very good horse to win the Arkle and he has everything going for him.’
      • ‘Installing a heat sink inside the case takes some true flexibility of the fingers.’
      require, need, necessitate, demand, call for, entail, involve
      View synonyms
    2. 7.2 Hold; accommodate.
      ‘an exclusive island hideaway that takes just twenty guests’
      • ‘The boat takes twenty guests.’
      • ‘We intend to buy fertilised eggs - the incubator we have bought takes 24 hen eggs but we might start with 12.’
    3. 7.3 Wear or require (a particular size of garment or type of complementary article)
      ‘he only takes size 5 boots’
      • ‘The reason I bought it was because my digital camera takes two AA batteries.’
      • ‘Second, he probably no more knows what size the child takes, any more than he knows how to crochet.’
      wear, habitually wear, use
      View synonyms
  • 8no object (of a plant or seed) take root or begin to grow; germinate.

    ‘the fuchsia cuttings had taken and were looking good’
    • ‘The grass has taken and was long and wet in the morning and was full of snails sucking to thick blades.’
    1. 8.1 (of an added substance) become successfully established.
      ‘these type of grafts take much better than other xenografts’
      • ‘However unfortunately in the first attempt, the embryo did not take and did not grow.’
      be effective, have effect, take effect, take hold, take root, be efficacious, be productive, be in force, be in operation, be efficient, be effectual, be useful
      View synonyms
  • 9Grammar
    Have or require as part of the appropriate construction.

    ‘verbs which take both the infinitive and the finite clause as their object’
    • ‘There is no infallible rule identifying the verbs that take both, but they generally form nouns in tion.’
    • ‘However, some transitive verbs take a prepositional phrase instead of an indirect object.’
    • ‘For example, the open command takes as an argument the name of the file containing the data.’

noun

  • 1A scene or sequence of sound or vision photographed or recorded continuously at one time.

    ‘he completed a particularly difficult scene in two takes’
    • ‘I think it was totally different to any animation movie I have seen before, it was another type of take.’
    • ‘Getting them to be serious for a minute or two, they reveal that a sheer amount of takes were required for Large Pro to be happy with his vocal performance.’
    • ‘Finally, Jake Gyllenhaal leaned over said that Ang regularly did 15 takes and not to worry.’
    • ‘The late Stanley Kubrick, director of Eyes Wide Shut, regularly did 100 takes.’
    • ‘I wanted to keep cool throughout the take and not show that my foot was caught.’
    • ‘When one of them kisses Robbie a little too passionately, Tasha yells out and ruins a take.’
    • ‘But you want to get it done and do it in the least amount of takes possible.’
    • ‘The number of takes required to complete each scene is said to have rocketed.’
    • ‘There are more clean-ups, and when Wallace is happy, producer Tony Platt calls for a take.’
    scene, sequence, filmed sequence, clip, part, segment
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A particular version of or approach to something.
      ‘his own whimsical take on life’
      • ‘The main problem with his take on the story is his overwhelming niceness as a director.’
      • ‘He is obviously having fun with his take on a midwestern everyman, but make no mistake, it is a take and little more.’
      • ‘Do you think Hollywood is running out of ideas or do you welcome new takes on classic stories?’
      • ‘A modern version of the same book will have a different take on what we should know.’
      • ‘His new takes on the classic tales made us laugh out loud at more than one bedtime.’
      view of, reading of, version of, interpretation of, understanding of, account of, explanation of, analysis of, approach to
      View synonyms
  • 2An amount of something gained or acquired from one source or in one session.

    ‘the take from commodity taxation’
    • ‘You encourage as many sites as possible to shove up ads in exchange for a take of any revenue driven by those ads.’
    catch, haul, bag, yield, net
    revenue, income, gain, profit, money received, payments received
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1US The money received at a cinema or theatre for seats.
      • ‘Die Another Day opened over the weekend with the biggest take ever for a Bond film.’
      revenue, income, gain, profit, money received, payments received
      View synonyms
  • 3Printing
    An amount of copy set up at one time or by one compositor.

    • ‘When a compositor had set up his take he deposited the type set up by him on a galley upon the galley-bank, and deposited the copy from which he had set up the type in a drawer or box, or upon a table or shelf.’

Phrases

  • be on the take

    • informal Take bribes.

      ‘he may be county sheriff, but he's on the take’
      • ‘The police were often part of the network of corruption, on the take and/or brutal.’
      • ‘Of course there are people who say that Miller is on the take from someone for his vociferous defense of the this potential ecological nightmare.’
      • ‘It demands that where an official has knowledge that a colleague is on the take, this too is conveyed to those in a position to do something about it.’
      • ‘Once people learned so many politicians had been on the take - often in cahoots with business leaders - it was only natural that there would be a public outcry for a ‘war on corruption.’’
      • ‘It wasn't really a crime anyway in Philadelphia for a police officer to be on the take.’
      • ‘Spain's government is under mounting pressure from opposition politicians in Parliament who want to know whether Spanish officials also were on the take.’
      • ‘For years now we have listened to and read about one inquiry after another, about this politician and that politician who was on the take.’
      • ‘They made no secret of the fact that they were on the take.’
      • ‘Bulgarians are trenchant in their view that their country can no longer be perceived as a lawless, volatile state where every citizen is on the take.’
      • ‘From the constable to the cabinet minister, everyone, or at least almost everyone is on the take.’
  • be taken ill

    • Become ill suddenly.

      • ‘The man behind the world's tallest and fastest rollercoaster has died suddenly after being taken ill during a party.’
      • ‘Twelve people died and 5,000 more were taken ill as the nerve agent spread.’
      • ‘Five people were killed and 17 others were taken ill.’
      • ‘Suddenly, Emma is taken ill and having horrible dreams at night.’
      • ‘He was taken ill in the last two weeks and the suddenness of his departure left the whole community shocked and numb.’
      • ‘Yet if you were taken ill in the United States, for example, the cost of private medical treatment could be ruinous.’
      • ‘Derek was taken ill suddenly in The Caribbean Islands where he was performing as part of an entertainment special on board a cruise ship.’
      • ‘He was a youthful 70 years old and appeared fit and healthy and indeed was taken ill and died suddenly while playing a game of golf on Monday.’
      • ‘Latest figures suggest that about 6,000 service personnel engaged in the first Gulf War were taken ill afterwards and that some 600 have died.’
      • ‘All proceeds from the event will go to St Mary's Hospice, where Mr Bolton was cared for after suddenly being taken ill in September 2003 with a cancerous brain tumour.’
      become ill, fall ill, be taken ill, be taken sick, catch something
      View synonyms
  • have what it takes

    • informal Have the necessary qualities for success.

      ‘for those who have what it takes, early responsibility will bring job satisfaction’
      • ‘Thank you for having what it takes to run such an article.’
      • ‘We have what it takes - it just needs leadership and a change of Council.’
      • ‘The inference was that they simply did not have what it takes.’
      • ‘But he is confident he has what it takes to be a successful manager and it will be in the track suit on the training ground where he will make his biggest impact.’
      • ‘Does he have what it takes to get out there and create the conflict and controversy that are part and parcel of talk shows?’
      • ‘They seem to have what it takes to be successful, it will be interesting to see if and how they develop.’
      • ‘This term will include the achievements of women, that is they are successful and have what it takes to make it in the modern world today.’
      • ‘But do politicians have what it takes to succeed in the cutthroat world of blogging?’
      • ‘If you guessed ‘towel,’ then you may have what it takes to be a quiz team member.’
      • ‘If they play as well as I know they are capable of playing then Tallow have what it takes to survive.’
  • take advantage of (or take advice etc.)

  • take something as read

    • Assume something without the need for further discussion.

      ‘you can take it as read that you have the contract’
      • ‘It should be taken as read that the software used is capable of finding and correctly identifying any viruses that you may have.’
      • ‘The green issue should now be taken as read.’
      assume, suppose, dare say, imagine, take it, expect, believe, think, surmise, guess, judge, trust, conjecture, speculate, postulate, posit, hypothesize, deduce, divine, infer, conclude, presuppose, take for granted, take as read
      presuppose, take for granted, presume, assume, take it, suppose, surmise, think, accept, consider, postulate, posit
      View synonyms
    • see read
      • ‘I took it as read that she, like everyone else round here, must be a true-blue Democrat.’
      presume, suppose, take it, take for granted, take as read, take it as given, presuppose, conjecture, surmise, conclude, come to the conclusion, deduce, infer, draw the inference, reckon, reason, guess, imagine, think, fancy, suspect, expect, accept, believe, be of the opinion, understand, be given to understand, gather, glean
      View synonyms
  • take a chair (or seat)

    • Sit down.

      • ‘Isis then stepped down from the platform and took a chair near it, where she could still see the whole Council but she was no longer the center of attention.’
      • ‘He took a chair, and watched her warily through wire-framed glasses.’
      • ‘He then took a chair at the back of the room, as did my mother, and all of a sudden I was unsure of what I was meant to do or say.’
      • ‘Nezbek walked into the main room and took a chair.’
      • ‘Jude followed Jamie into the board room of Mason Enterprises and took a chair near the back of the room.’
      • ‘Sean sat in a chair in the corner of the plain room and the girls each took a chair opposite him.’
      • ‘The smile refusing to leave my face, I obediently led my friend into the living room, where the two of us stepped over the discarded scouting reports and each took a chair.’
      • ‘Each of them took a chair after setting their books down at the table.’
      • ‘She took a chair beside a disheveled looking woman who was most likely a writer and waited patiently for someone important to arrive.’
      • ‘Yoli came in after a bit and took a chair and introductions were made.’
  • take five

    • informal Have a short break.

      ‘there was a newsreel crew taking five at a little café nearby’
      • ‘F has now gone and I am just taking five to chill again before commencing more bagging/boxing!’
      • ‘Sometimes it's obvious that everyone took five and smoked a joint the size of a rolled-up Sunday New York Times.’
      • ‘Whatever you said to them can come in and there's just a minefield of things, if you actually wanted to represent this low-life that you tell him to go ahead take five.’
      • ‘Whenever you feel your brain doing the stress sizzle, take five.’
  • take a lot of (or some) ——

    • Be difficult to do or effect in the specified way.

      ‘he might take some convincing’
      • ‘The book is designed with marginal notes, which takes some getting used to but are very helpful.’
      • ‘With just four trains an hour and only one route home it's taken some getting used to.’
      • ‘This tough love and honesty takes some getting used to, but it is valuable.’
      • ‘It took some convincing (and maybe a bribe), but he agreed to come home to see the girls and his grandchildren.’
      • ‘It takes a lot of style and pacing to flash back and forth from action scenes to images and thoughts in the mind of an actor.’
      • ‘In the beginning it did take some getting used to.’
      • ‘" It takes a lot of training for a person to develop a performance onstage.’
  • take someone in hand

    • Undertake to control or reform someone.

      • ‘From the first time I ever met Richard, several years ago, he struck me as the kind of guy who probably needed a good woman to take him in hand, and sort him out.’
      • ‘He could take her in hand - ensuring that she finds a flattering wardrobe, fashionable hair and a smart social circle which will elevate her status.’
      • ‘If she is not taken in hand and directed on the right lines, hers could be a talent that is, wasted in the desert air.’
      • ‘Does The Age have someone who'll basically take Andrew in hand and say, ‘Look, I'll be your eyes and ears, if you like’?’
      • ‘But all I really want them to do is to take me in hand - to quietly and firmly and with tremendous affection tell me that I've done enough, that I can stop now.’
      • ‘Then Old Trafford manager Mike Watkinson took him in hand, working on his technique, and last summer he was the talk of every county dressing-room.’
      • ‘It can only lead to trouble unless someone takes him in hand.’
      • ‘Sunil Gavaskar once wrote of how, as a boy, he was taken in hand by the legendary Bombay coach Vasu Paranjype.’
      • ‘Camilla announced one evening to her gang in the lounge that she was very sorry for George, and she thought he needed someone to take him in hand (whatever that might imply).’
      • ‘I suppose your mother who was alerted at that stage was more capable of taking you in hand because the situation around her wasn't as toxic as it is now?’
      control, have authority over, be in charge of, direct, preside over, lead, dominate, master
      View synonyms
  • take something in hand

    • Start doing or dealing with a task.

      • ‘But Jesus immediately took the situation in hand by rebuking the unclean spirit and healing the boy.’
      • ‘Fortunately, the Capitol Hill police, who seemed interested in order above all, took matters in hand, and after we'd preached for the cameras they marched us into the rotunda for an on-time arrest.’
      • ‘It was getting to a point where Donnan was going to get himself killed, when Golin took matters in hand and cocked Donnan a good shot to the head, knocking him unconscious.’
      • ‘But let's not be taken back by that factor because it was back in the 1980s when Fr. Peyton, C.C., took the matter in hand during his days in Tubber and set up the first Tidy Towns Committee.’
      • ‘The scheme was coldly looked on until Mr Chamberlain took it in hand as part of a great national and imperial policy.’
      • ‘The New Zealand-born leader, Alan Loveday, took matters in hand.’
      • ‘My son Luke, meanwhile, took it in hand to go with a friend to claim one of the ‘Fourteeners’ (there are 53 mountains in Colorado that are over 14,000 feet).’
      • ‘But that was before Rockefeller / Hricak Architects of Venice, Calif., took matters in hand.’
      • ‘Just then a slight shudder reverberated through the deck plates and Exodus quickly took the situation in hand while the two men cast bewildered looks at each other.’
      • ‘It was then Mattie Kiely took matters in hand for Kilrossanty and points in the 56th and 59th minutes had the Nire reeling.’
      deal with, apply oneself to, address oneself to, get to grips with, get stuck into, busy oneself with, set one's hand to, grapple with, take on, attend to, see to, sort out, take care of, pursue, handle, manage
      View synonyms
  • take ill

    • informal Become ill, especially suddenly.

      • ‘Paul was out walking on Kiltimagh mountain with friends from St. John's Western Care Centre, Ballinamore when he took ill and died suddenly.’
      • ‘Faust took sick in 1914 and was no longer with the Giants.’
      • ‘During the first half, Jimmy Grimes took ill and died suddenly.’
      • ‘She took ill and died suddenly while on the way to Castlebar hospital.’
      • ‘Submitted to conditions unfit for man or beast, the goat eventually took sick, became too weak to walk, and died just as Hunt began sketching its head.’
      • ‘Albert, formerly from Knockroe, Mayo Abbey took ill and died suddenly while working in the Manchester region.’
      • ‘Some hours later Martin took ill and died suddenly.’
      • ‘But, she tells Tom, when her mistress took sick, Prue had to spend days and nights caring for her, and she lost her milk.’
      • ‘Michael took ill suddenly on Monday evening of last week and was pronounced dead in the General Hospital in Castlebar on Saturday.’
      • ‘Mick took ill and died suddenly just 20 minutes after one of those family get-togethers on a recent Saturday night.’
  • take something ill

    • archaic Resent something done or said.

      ‘there was no point in calling her attention to the implications of her statement, she would only take it ill’
      • ‘I hope you will not take it ill that I asked my son about your doings, we tell each other everything.’
      • ‘So I stand and watch ball after ball whistle past my outstretched hand and, try as I might, I take it ill to see him running about like a dive bomber, whooping and hollering.’
      begrudge, feel aggrieved about, feel aggrieved at, feel bitter about, grudge, be annoyed about, be annoyed at, be angry about, be angry at, be resentful of, dislike, be displeased about, be displeased at, take exception to, object to, be offended by, take amiss, take offence at, take umbrage at
      View synonyms
  • take it from me

    • I can assure you.

      ‘take it from me, kid—I've been there, done it, seen it all’
      • ‘If you get the impression that the book is poorly written, take it from me, it has nothing to do with my translation.’
      • ‘If you've never seen it, take it from me: it's no joke.’
      • ‘However, take it from me, I would have felt a lot better having it available when I was going through the turmoil.’
      • ‘Don't take it from me though - I'm just one person.’
      • ‘But take it from me: He was everything you'd want a comedy writer to be.’
      • ‘I think you can take it from me there is a warning out to all rabbits that they should not assume I will brake for them in the future.’
      • ‘You can take it from me: Jack will not be happy about it.’
      • ‘But take it from me, this film really is something special.’
      • ‘So take it from me, it's far better to talk about something early on, despite how difficult it may seem at the time, than to leave it to fester and allow it to do some real damage.’
      • ‘Most do, but take it from me, there are some who don't.’
  • take it on one (or oneself) to do something

    • Decide to do something without asking for permission or advice.

      ‘she had taken it on herself to rearrange all the furniture in the sitting room’
      • ‘They took it on themselves to define the distinction between high and popular culture and then police its boundaries.’
      • ‘Roth thought, ‘How could I take it on myself to decide that my father should be finished with life, life which is ours to know just once?’’
      • ‘Edward decided to take it on himself to rid Ralph's house of Alex.’
      • ‘He even sometimes read petitions from individual prisoners, taking it on himself to decide whether to release them.’
      • ‘You had a juror who took it on himself to have a press conference on the courthouse steps to say how happy he was that they convicted her of insider trading.’
      • ‘Any useful advice would mainly have been that Abid should consult a solicitor; no social worker would or should take it on himself to give any legal advice.’
      • ‘He took it on himself to help at the mosque, things that other people wouldn't want to do.’
      • ‘One Highland laird who had been the victim of a housebreaking in 2004 took it on himself to check out whether any of his rare china collection, stolen from his mansion near Kingussie, might be up for sale online.’
      • ‘He then probably took it on himself to carry out these very brutal acts.’
      • ‘If you take it on yourself to make a diagnosis, for example by deciding that the condition isn't serious, you could be liable if the condition turns out to require urgent treatment.’
  • take it or leave it

    • usually in imperativeSaid to express that the offer one has made is not negotiable and that one is indifferent to another's reaction to it.

      ‘that's the deal—take it or leave it’
      • ‘We have already been told that the moving of the market and interchange are not negotiable and that, in effect, we can either take it or leave it.’
      • ‘He offered the cash and said take it or leave it and the bank eventually came back and said it would accept the cash.’
      • ‘They suspect that the government will then abandon the talks and make them a take it or leave it offer.’
      • ‘This looks like an opening gambit rather than a take it or leave it offer.’
      • ‘It tends to be a case of take it or leave it, so now what we have to do is speak to more clubs and see if we can get a better deal elsewhere.’
      • ‘And they would insist that they would choose the lawyers for you, and they give you a very stark choice: take it or leave it.’
      • ‘Would they tell them to take it or leave it, this is what we offer?’
      • ‘It was presented on a plate to us in Melbourne with a take it or leave it attitude.’
      • ‘The art of haggling, as I see it, is to not actually want what is on offer, and show a take it or leave it attitude.’
      • ‘The invitation to consent is very much on a take it or leave it basis.’
  • take it out of

    • 1Exhaust the strength of (someone)

      ‘parties and tours can take it out of you, especially if you are over 65’
      • ‘But there is no doubt that it takes it out of you when you're IT with a poorly toddler and a big ol' fat pregnant belly, a household still to run and so forth.’
      • ‘Every so often we would try to get them to come out of their rooms, but they were exhausted - it really took it out of them.’
      • ‘Not surprisingly 4 hours of semi-sober sleep followed by 12 hours of work, followed by 6 hours of recovery sleep, followed by another 12 hours of work takes it out of you.’
      • ‘This week could be one that takes it out of me completely.’
      • ‘I was traveling from the North West of the City to the East End by bus and I think that took it out of me a lot.’
      • ‘But man, two and half hours of running around after a Frisbee will really take it out of you… and every joint and tendon.’
      • ‘For our exhausted purposes ('cause holy man, this film really takes it out of you) I'm pretty sure two will do.’
      • ‘Driving constantly at such a high speed really takes it out of you.’
      • ‘That really took it out of me; I felt exhausted afterwards.’
      • ‘DJ-ing for such long sets really takes it out of you and it's strenuous.’
      exhaust, drain, enervate, tire, fatigue, wear out, weary, debilitate, jade
      View synonyms
    • 2Take reprisals against.

      • ‘He took it out of Kuwait in 1991, and we made him spit it out.’
      • ‘Schools are doing their bit, and one of the several antics at Biddenham Upper School was an opportunity to take it out of four brave teachers - at 25p a go.’
  • take someone out of themselves

    • Make a person forget their worries.

      • ‘It takes them out of themselves, and gives them a thrill.’
  • take that!

    • Exclaimed when hitting someone or taking decisive action against them.

      ‘You lowlifes! Take that! And that! And that!’
      • ‘I cried, beginning to climb back onto the island, ‘take that!’’
  • take one's time

    • Not hurry.

      ‘take your time if you're planning a big job’
      • ‘I'm going to take my time, no hurry, and concentrate on walking to detention in a dignified, poised manner.’
      • ‘Dominic had never been one to hurry, and he took his time as he considered.’
      • ‘The stewards took their time with the inevitable inquiry, and the only question was whether they would disqualify the horse altogether or leave the result alone and merely punish the jockey.’
      • ‘You Taurans like taking your time and hate being hurried, but right now Mars and Venus don't want you bogged down and stuck in a rut through some stubborn refusal to change your ways.’
      • ‘We all take our time, dawdling across in twos and threes until some poor car has been sitting there for five minutes.’
      • ‘I took my time, dawdling at windows where I had the chance, stopping to look at the paintings.’
      • ‘They got there but - by God - they took their time.’
      • ‘It is not comely and not of their nature for Goths to hurry, so Morgan takes her time, making sure she is last to get up and leave.’
      • ‘So they took their time before joining the party.’
      • ‘I think about the teachers who ran us through our lessons as if racing from one period to the next, and the teachers who took their time with us and really taught us something.’
      go slowly, not hurry, be leisurely, proceed in a leisurely fashion, dally, dawdle, delay, linger, go at a snail's pace, drag one's feet, waste time, while away time, kill time
      View synonyms

Phrasal Verbs

  • take after

    • Resemble (a parent or ancestor)

      ‘the rest of us take after our mother’
      • ‘Scarlett always said that he took after his grandparents rather than his parents.’
      • ‘May you take after your wonderful parents, and my treasured friends who share your name.’
      • ‘Katherine could tell she took after her mother.’
      • ‘He was blonde and resembled his mother while his sisters took after their father.’
      • ‘I just hope though that the kids take after their mother.’
      • ‘Pete took after his mother in slimness, but was the tallest in the family, beating his father by an inch.’
      • ‘Aikane, who seemed to take after neither parent and yet fitted in perfectly with the family, was the sweetest, most genuine person Kai knew.’
      • ‘The rest of us took after our grandmother's people, the recipients of a strong gene of predictable traits, like the double chins much in evidence on every other relative in my field of vision.’
      • ‘I took after my mother, at least Pa always told me so.’
      • ‘And of course, George takes after my mother a lot.’
      resemble, look like, be like, be similar to, bear a resemblance to, have the look of
      View synonyms
  • take against

    • Begin to dislike (someone), often for no strong or obvious reason.

      ‘from the moment he arrived, they took against this talented loudmouth’
      • ‘Why the crowd took against him at the Stadium of Light is an old story now that doesn't matter to him any more beyond what it added to him in terms of character.’
      • ‘From the start Frederick-William took against his son, for the two were as unlike as possible.’
      • ‘Fairly or unfairly, the public took against him big-time from the start.’
      • ‘The curator insisted it was of placid temper, but obviously it took against me, and only a dangling camera bag saved my legs from a mauling.’
      • ‘Auden - ‘Miss Master’, as Chester called him - took against Paul Bowles, and was pained by their friends.’
      • ‘Saria and Raj then complained loudly to their team members that the artists took against them right from the start ‘because we weren't posh enough’.’
      • ‘He began talking about revolutionary socialism in his teens, taking against the school and the system that underpinned it.’
      • ‘First impressions can be deceptive, as Anoushka discovered on that first night when she got blootered and half the house took against her.’
      • ‘But others note that if she takes against somebody, their access will be ruthlessly cut off.’
      • ‘I wear a baseball cap because I like the way it looks, but it seems like enough of a reason for the police to take against you.’
      take a dislike to, feel hostile towards, view with disfavour, look askance on, become unfriendly towards
      View synonyms
  • take something apart

    • 1Dismantle something.

      • ‘What ‘overriding narratives’ do you feel are being dismissed or dismantled that should be kept intact, and who's taking them apart?’
      • ‘The paths and roads received an uplift with some resurfacing and the unpopular parking bays along Main Street were taken apart and made into more attractive surrounds for the trees planted in the street while still serving as parking bays.’
      • ‘When responsibly understood, the implications of deconstruction are quite different from the misleading clichés often used to describe a process of dismantling or taking things apart.’
      • ‘I watched workmen dismantling several ships and asked why they were taking the vessels apart, for they seemed to be very careful not to damage the integrity of the pieces.’
      • ‘A striking historical church is to be dismantled and moved - and it is the second time it has been taken apart.’
      dismantle, pull to pieces, take to pieces, pull to bits, take to bits, pull apart, disassemble, break up
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1informal Attack, criticize, or defeat someone or something in a vigorous or forceful way.
        ‘she was relishing the sight of me being verbally taken apart’
        • ‘Hopefully some member of the opposition parties will take him apart.’
        • ‘This was the man who took Manchester United apart at the seams, the talisman for the attack.’
        • ‘Out of frame of late Tiger sharpened his claws again last week and took Mount Juliet apart.’
        • ‘Looking back on it they really took us apart for a couple of spells at the beginning and towards the end of the game but for a long period in the middle of the game we dominated but just didn't put the scores on the board.’
        • ‘Up the road at Torrance House, Ellon took East Kilbride apart by 45-0.’
        • ‘At home to Liverpool we were taken apart - it was like a kids game of ‘shots in’ for them.’
        • ‘Daniel O’ Brien singly handily took Burrin apart as he scored three in the second half to bring his tally to four.’
        • ‘Even more, a few times my Chinese friends took me apart.’
        • ‘Graham Harrison, also a member of the squad but yet to represent the county, took Atkins apart in the opening round, throwing 180 for 14 then 15 darts.’
        • ‘But nothing to match what the team produced in the second half last Sunday as they took Tipp apart and inflicted as comprehensive a defeat on the Premier county as the famed blue and gold has ever suffered.’
        criticize, attack, censure, condemn, denigrate, find fault with, pillory, maul, lambaste, flay, savage
        View synonyms
  • take something away

    • Buy food at a cafe or restaurant for eating elsewhere.

      ‘he ordered a lamb madras to take away’
      • ‘If you are just running in to get something to take out, it's okay - the burger was awesome, the fries were old, and the soda was soda.’
      • ‘I really wanted a milkshake and ordered one to take away.’
  • take away from

    • Detract from.

      ‘that shouldn't take away from the achievement of the French’
      • ‘Like a lot of new books talking about postmodernity, the publisher tried to change the look of the paper it is printed on and I think it took away from the book rather than added to it.’
      • ‘This took away from what was otherwise good cooking, and did not seem very West Coast.’
      • ‘The prop almost looks dirty, taking away from what is supposed to be a beautiful monster (at least as far as monsters go).’
      • ‘From what I remember, there was also an alternative parade organised by some religious people who felt that the main parade took away from what Patrick really stood for.’
      • ‘Both Mitchell and O'Brien agree, that one game does not take away from what has so far been a successful season.’
      • ‘The band were solid (though a bit too guitar-heavy) but Leyton's constant microphone spinning and hardcore delivery really took away from that.’
      • ‘We've got great programs, they're doing great things, but the distractions were taking away from that.’
      • ‘Still, it is not necessarily a bad thing as long as it does not take away from who and what I am.’
      • ‘The joy you get from kids is 24 hours a day and the fact that you are not there from 9 to 5 doesn't take away from that.’
      • ‘The drunkenness really took away from what I was looking at.’
      belittle, diminish, reduce, lessen, minimize, lower, make light of, play down, discount, soft-pedal, brush aside, gloss over, trivialize, decry, depreciate, denigrate, devalue, devaluate, deprecate
      View synonyms
  • take someone back

    • Strongly remind someone of a past time.

      ‘if ‘Disco Inferno’ doesn't take you back, the bell-bottom pants will’
      • ‘Step through the heavy wood and glass doors of Hargadon Bros. and you are taken back to a time when time didn't matter, where the money in your pocket didn't dictate the good time you had.’
      • ‘The music between scene changes took us back to the 1980s.’
      • ‘There in the library amongst the smell of books and binding, he was taken back to what seemed like a past life.’
      • ‘The world now awaits a verbal fudge that will end seven days which took us back to the Cold War.’
      • ‘The color reminded her of Radcliffe, but their gaze took her back to the days when she was a child.’
      • ‘We were given headphones, playing a soundtrack that at first threatened to mimic the worst kind of heritage audio tour, as it took us back in time.’
      • ‘It took us back to the 1980s - before there were treatments for HIV infection - when so many became infected with HIV, progressing to serious illness and death from AIDS.’
      evoke, awaken one's memories of, evoke one's memories of, remind one of, put one in mind of, conjure up, summon up, call up
      View synonyms
  • take something back

    • 1Retract a statement.

      ‘I take back nothing of what I said’
      • ‘Well, tell your teammates to catch a pass and I'll take that statement back.’
      • ‘These are not friendly guys, and given the opportunity to spend the night at it with a few members of the editorial pages of the Star Tribune, I think that maybe they would take their statements back.’
      • ‘She didn't realize how rude the statement sounded until it was too late to take it back.’
      • ‘Having said it, Paisley could not bring himself to take it back.’
      retract, withdraw, renounce, disclaim, disown, unsay, disavow, recant, abjure, repudiate, override
      View synonyms
    • 2Return unsatisfactory goods to a shop.

      • ‘Even if the store claims ‘no returns,’ I would take it back along with a dramatic protest.’
      • ‘In internet auctions, if you are disappointed it is not like taking something back to a shop.’
      • ‘If any sets have exposed bare wires or terminals around the lampholders consumers should take them back to the shop from where they were purchased.’
      • ‘But she thinks Express has the best return policy, because you can take an item back at any time if you have a receipt.’
      • ‘Our Ghost Ship DVD threw a wobbly half way through when we tried it last night, so we took it back to the shop today.’
      • ‘He was the one who took things back to the shop if we weren't pleased!’
      • ‘I took some faulty goods back to a shop, but the trader pointed to a notice which said ‘No Refunds’.’
      • ‘I spent a long time talking on ICQ, took something back to a shop, read my book, painted my toenails.’
      • ‘The research shows people are now willing to make a nuisance of themselves if a restaurant meal is not up to scratch and feel confident taking a product back to a shop.’
      • ‘It's not the same as buying a pair of jeans, deciding you don't like them, and then taking them back to the shop for a refund.’
      1. 2.1(of a shop) accept goods returned as unsatisfactory.
        • ‘While the shop was willing to take the durables back, it has yet not replaced nor refunded the equipment.’
        • ‘If he did not manage to sell it before or during his forthcoming journey to Flanders, he would return it to the dealer Fierens who was willing to take it back at cost, namely three hundred livres.’
        accept back, give a refund for, exchange, trade, swap
        View synonyms
    • 3Printing
      Transfer text to the previous line.

      • ‘The mark surrounds the matter to be taken back and it also extends in to the margin.’
  • take something down

    • 1Write down spoken words.

      ‘I took down the address’
      • ‘Certainly, within Maori heritage, oral history is of extreme importance, and it is extremely important that it is taken down and recorded in an appropriate fashion.’
      • ‘Vincent was reading one of her thick books and taking notes down.’
      • ‘Personal details were taken down for the record.’
      • ‘As he reflected on this fact, he began to write the notes for the day and that he knew would just be a waste of chalk because no one would take the notes down.’
      • ‘Are you taking notes down or maybe just scrawling love messages to your hubby?’
      • ‘Stewart spoke from a military hospital in Sydney, McAuley spoke from Melbourne, and she took their statement down in longhand.’
      • ‘I shuffled through my pockets, trying to find a piece of paper and a writing utensil so I could take the address down.’
      • ‘He muttered things under his breath in a language I didn't recognize, shifting between several books, and taking notes down in a little black book.’
      • ‘Obviously, it can be very useful to take your notes down straight away, i.e. as soon as something interesting happens.’
      • ‘When I started to make it from the begin, I saw Mrs. Kennedy taking notes down of everything I do.’
      write, note, note down, make a note of, set down, jot, jot down, scribble, scrawl, take down, record, register, document, minute, put in writing, commit to paper
      write down, note down, make a note of, jot down, set down, mark down, record, put on record, commit to paper, put in black and white, register, draft, document, minute, pen
      View synonyms
    • 2Dismantle and remove a structure.

      ‘the old Norman church was taken down in 1819’
      • ‘The windows were falling in, there were holes in the floor, and even the church bell had been taken down and left in a chair.’
      • ‘Many older buildings have been taken down to make room for roads and newer structures.’
      • ‘It does not make sense, and Denmark, the world leader in this form of energy production, has now stopped its building programme and is actually taking the structures down.’
      • ‘In addition, in every street of every suburb, cottages and structures in back yards have been taken down, leaving lodgers without accommodation.’
      • ‘But their health has deteriorated so much in recent months that they are willing to return the money if the structure is taken down.’
      • ‘The property has been in storage since the 1950s, when it was taken down as one of the few ancient structures to survive Second World War bombing.’
      • ‘The building consisted of mass concrete and heavy duty steel and it took a major effort by demolition machines to take it down.’
      • ‘But council bosses ordered the residents to take the gates down - or have them removed - because they were blocking access to a public alleyway.’
      • ‘Tony and Jane were given until March this year to take the structure down.’
      • ‘In recent weeks the roof of the building had been removed and then the inside of the premises had been taken down, leaving just the exterior walls standing as an empty shell.’
      remove, dismantle, disassemble, unfasten, separate, take apart, take to pieces, take out, disconnect
      View synonyms
  • take from

    • Detract from.

      ‘training for the show has not taken from her efforts to campaign for the shipyard’
  • take someone in

    • 1Accommodate someone as a lodger or because they are homeless or in difficulties.

      ‘the convent took in single Catholic ladies fallen on hard times’
      • ‘She is destitute, begs and is near death almost for three days, until she comes upon a house, whose members take her in and care for her.’
      • ‘Seraph brought her to the convent, which took her in.’
      • ‘I took you in, fed you, cleaned you, raised you (even if like a servant), and cared for you.’
      • ‘Terry Evans took Barrett in when he was homeless and offered him a place to stay.’
      • ‘But people were really kind to us, they took us in and fed us and stuff, so it was pretty impossible to stay mad on the whole tour, and I was trying really hard.’
      • ‘They took us in, fed us, clothed us, and taught us basic survival skills.’
      • ‘The first year they took someone in, he expected free accommodation for the rest of the summer.’
      • ‘I took them in and have given them a warm house to sleep in, lots to eat and long walks across the tundra.’
      • ‘Uncle was the one who took them in, fed them and taught them how to live on their own.’
      • ‘Remarkably this German woman, Frau Fuchs, and her husband, an ambulance driver, not only took them in but harboured them until the Russians entered Dresden.’
      accommodate, board, house, feed, put up, take care of, admit, let in, receive, welcome, take, billet, harbour
      View synonyms
    • 2Cheat, fool, or deceive someone.

      ‘she tried to pass this off as an amusing story, but nobody was taken in’
      • ‘The next moment they think they can take me in by tricks that a baby would see through - bless them!’
      • ‘But she was not taken in by his charade and finally tricked him and galloped off with his mount and money alike.’
      • ‘I must admit I was taken in absolutely by Michael Volle (Beckmesser).’
      • ‘In every situation, we demonstrate the clairvoyance of the dupe who swears that he will not be taken in again.’
      • ‘In May 2002, Roy Greenslade, the editor of the Mirror during its witch-hunt against Scargill, admitted he had been taken in by lies.’
      • ‘We have to admit, we were taken in at first when we received an email charting the conversation between one Bradley Chait and one Claire Swire.’
      • ‘So you were taken in just like all the other fools by her beauty?’
      • ‘We chuckled at how Bill Buckley had been taken in by a hoax involving postal taxes on internet mail.’
      • ‘In fact we actually had really interesting discussions about it once we all admitted that maybe we were taken in in some parts and we enjoyed the joke.’
      • ‘As things had turned out, however, he had not been taken in by the con trick and he had not suffered a little, redeemable financial damage and a whole lot of less easily repaired damage to his pride.’
      deceive, delude, hoodwink, mislead, trick, dupe, fool, cheat, defraud, swindle, outwit, gull, humbug, bluff, hoax, bamboozle
      View synonyms
  • take something in

    • 1Undertake work at home.

      • ‘Take laundry in to do for others that don't want to be bothered doing this.’
    • 2Make a garment tighter by altering its seams.

      • ‘When taking garments in, try on the garment and pin at the spot where the most fabric needs to be removed.’
      • ‘I took it in to be altered before I went to New Jersey in August because it needed to be taken in all over and the skirt needed to be lifted up.’
      1. 2.1Furl a sail.
        • ‘As they drew near, they began to take in sail after sail, until they were reduced to the same condition.’
    • 3Include or encompass something.

      ‘the sweep of his arm took in most of Main Street’
      • ‘The book attempts to take in a too broad canvas and not everyone is au fait with pastiche operetta.’
      • ‘The cove was named after Alfred Waylen, the original grantee of Swan Location 74 which took in most of the present day localities of Myaree and Alfred Cove.’
      include, encompass, embrace, contain, comprise, cover, incorporate, embody, comprehend, subsume, envelop
      View synonyms
      1. 3.1Fully understand or absorb something heard or seen.
        ‘she took in the scene at a glance’
        • ‘Kate's dad Ron phoned me up to tell me and when I heard I couldn't take it in.’
        • ‘I stood on the cliff tonight and took it in, arms out in the standard Zorba-the-Czech posture I assume in these moods of surpassing joy.’
        • ‘That was something I didn't want to do, but knew I had to in order to fully take it in.’
        • ‘Melissa gestured toward Braden, Megan just nodded, not quite fully taking it in, but more like stuck in that moment of time.’
        • ‘Of course, I will need to re-read the transcript later to take it in fully.’
        • ‘We are allowed to look at a scene and take things in.’
        • ‘But I was too loaded to ever take the time to actually take it in and understand it.’
        • ‘Shivering with fear and cold, I tried to take the whole scene in.’
        • ‘He carried this piece of paper to the glass door of the classroom, and then instructed me to stand facing the door, holding the piece of paper to the door with my forehead, so I could stare at the two words and take them in fully.’
        • ‘I threw my arms around him and took his presence in.’
        comprehend, understand, grasp, follow, absorb, soak in, assimilate, make out
        View synonyms
    • 4Visit or attend a place or event in a casual way or on the way to another.

      ‘he'd maybe take in a movie, or just relax’
      • ‘He was in town with his wife, and they took in a minor league ball game earlier in the day.’
      • ‘We even took in a movie, in French with Spanish subtitles!’
  • take off

    • 1(of an aircraft or bird) become airborne.

      • ‘The wheels drop off when the aircraft takes off, and the ground crew retrieves them.’
      • ‘Any unfound debris on runways could cause damage to aircraft landing and taking off at the airport.’
      • ‘Coun Brand says the noise is mainly caused by aircraft taking off from the airport.’
      • ‘The local press has played up the danger these birds might pose for aircraft landing and taking off.’
      • ‘It worked and the plane's head rose a little bit and the aircraft took off safely.’
      • ‘The airline says it had no knowledge of the security breach before the aircraft took off.’
      • ‘Aircraft taking off from Manchester Airport could have crashed into part of a jumbo jet engine which had fallen on to the runway.’
      • ‘Crowds regularly flocked to the base to see the aircraft take off on one of its many test flights.’
      • ‘British fighter aircraft taking off from West Malling airfield were guided by the terrible orange glow on the horizon.’
      • ‘This will be used later with a stock shot of an aircraft taking off from the airport.’
      become airborne, leave the ground, take to the air, take wing
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1(of an enterprise) become successful or popular.
        ‘the newly launched electronic newspaper has really taken off’
        • ‘Should it ever take off and become wildly popular, you'd be advised to sign up now to avoid MeFi style agony.’
        • ‘His career took off when he was spotted by an Italian scout playing in a friendly tournament in a Paris park.’
        • ‘Their pure fruit smoothie recipes took off, and they've grown steadily since.’
        • ‘Then Hotmail and the like took off and almost everyone started using web-based e-mail.’
        • ‘The Ferry was a success, and the fledgling company really started to take off.’
        • ‘We were going to just count the number of nominations we were getting, but as it took off there were too many for us to read them all.’
        • ‘They were astonished at how the business took off with young Western-born Muslims.’
        • ‘The business really took off by the end of December, with all places now full.’
        • ‘As Carlyle's career slowly took off, the couple moved to London, settling in Chelsea.’
        • ‘But as we started to get the traditional boost of people voting on their way home from work it just took off.’
        succeed, do well, become popular, catch on, progress, prosper, flourish, thrive, boom, turn out well, work, work out
        View synonyms
    • 2Depart hastily.

      ‘the officer took off after his men’
      • ‘He had retrieved it from a rubbish bin but was having little success in taking off with his prize.’
      • ‘The limousine took off, and the pensioners all moved to one side to let the car through.’
      • ‘His leg was probably broken at this point but he held on as the Mondeo took off at great speed along Worksop Road.’
      • ‘The very saddest day of both of our lives was on my 18th birthday when my mother took off.’
      • ‘So myself and all my mates all took off for England, and I was to remain there in fact for five years.’
      • ‘Sixty-years ago last week, Glenn Miller took off in the fog for Paris and was never seen again.’
      • ‘A taxi driver was beaten and robbed by three men who then took off in his car.’
      • ‘The guards were raiding and he took off like an Olympic sprinter, only to come to a sudden halt.’
      • ‘The police were called and on arrival Robinson took off but was stopped soon after, the court heard.’
      • ‘Together they made millions, but when the relationship soured Doherty took off with just a small bag.’
      run away, run off, flee, abscond, take flight, decamp, disappear, leave, go, depart, make off, bolt, make a break for it, make a run for it, take to one's heels, beat a hasty retreat, make a quick exit, make one's getaway, escape, head for the hills
      withdraw, retire, take one's leave, make one's departure, leave, exit, depart, go away, pull out, quit, make oneself scarce
      View synonyms
  • take someone off

    • Mimic someone humorously.

      • ‘The broad social base on which the theatre rested during this period enabled the mimics to take off people from practically all walks of life.’
      mimic, impersonate, imitate, ape, parody, mock, caricature, satirize, burlesque, lampoon, ridicule
      View synonyms
  • take something off

    • 1Remove clothing from one's or another's body.

      ‘she took off her cardigan’
      • ‘Colin gently laid her body on her bed and Meila took her shoes off and covered her body with her duvet cover.’
      • ‘You can't take that suit off, but your body will resume its former masculine shape.’
      • ‘Their ties were taken off, shoelaces removed, like common criminals.’
      • ‘Then the clothing is taken off and preserved - usually hung to dry so that its DNA evidence will not be destroyed by decomposition.’
      • ‘He took his clothes off and threw them down a banking before driving to his mother's house.’
      • ‘But did you intend to do so, which is why you took the clothes off your upper body?’
      • ‘After washing him up, and taking his outer clothing off, she was about to leave when a heavy hand came up behind her and pulled her down.’
      • ‘Rebecca Lloyd-Smith, prosecuting, told the jury the defendant took off his shirt.’
      • ‘The man just got out of the car, casually took his coat off, threw it into the car, calmly walked around to the car in front and lamped the driver.’
      • ‘Leanne then realized she should remove her hat and took it off, placing it under her chair.’
      remove, doff, divest oneself of, shed, strip off, pull off, peel off, climb out of, slip out of, shrug off, throw off, cast off, fling off, fling aside, discard
      View synonyms
    • 2Deduct part of an amount.

      • ‘It went up to $44.99 but then they took off $10 because we bundled with the internet, and that makes it $34.99.’
      deduct, subtract, take away, remove
      View synonyms
    • 3Choose to have a period away from work.

      ‘I took the next day off’
      • ‘For any of you who can take some time off over this period, it will be just the best way to explore the countryside of Thailand.’
      • ‘In fact what made the journalists so angry was that many of the bosses chose to take the night off.’
      • ‘After my hit single I chose to take a year off to write my autobiography and produce this new album.’
      • ‘After she took a few years off to start a clothing business, Burke's acting career is back in high gear.’
      • ‘Taking my Constitutionals indoors removes the option of taking the day off and blaming it all on the interaction between sun, earth, and atmosphere.’
      • ‘Anyway, I took the week off from work; they wanted to deduct that from my vacation pay.’
      • ‘And he took a night off last fall from ‘World News Tonight’ so that he could do the radio broadcast of a big benefit concert there.’
      • ‘I like their new stuff, but I agree that they took a long period off and people don't know what to expect.’
      • ‘If you feel progressively chillier over a week, take a day off to allow your body to recover.’
      • ‘After a continuous seven-year period, John took a year off and he returned in 2003 with renewed enthusiasm.’
  • take on

    • Become very upset, especially needlessly.

      ‘don't take on so—no need to upset yourself’
      • ‘Don't take on so, it will all turn out right in the end.’
      get upset, make a fuss, break down, get excited, go too far, lose one's sense of proportion, overreact
      View synonyms
  • take someone on

    • 1Engage an employee.

      • ‘There had been a medical examination before his employment which identified that disability and the respondent chose to take him on with that disability.’
      • ‘When you go to interviews many employers don't want to take you on because you are a single father.’
      • ‘The limit used to be a year, so when an employer took somebody on, at least that employee would work for a year before the provisions came in.’
      • ‘In Yogyakarta, UGM was recruiting a large number of employees and Soenaryo was taken on as an office boy at the school of technology.’
      • ‘When an employer takes somebody on, at the end of the day there has to be a reward.’
      • ‘But he is finding it impossible to find an employer willing to take him on as an apprentice.’
      • ‘They demanded that Metrobus take them on as permanent employees.’
      • ‘In the meantime, individuals so diagnosed might well be discriminated against by insurance companies who will refuse to take them on, or employers who will refuse to hire them.’
      • ‘Prospective employers hesitate to take him on, because they view him as a liability.’
      • ‘If that goes well, the employer will take him on as an apprentice.’
      engage, hire, employ, enrol, enlist, sign up, take into employment, put on the payroll
      View synonyms
    • 2Be willing or ready to meet an adversary or opponent.

      ‘a group of villagers has taken on the planners’
      • ‘Murray was a thorn in the side of the City defenders all afternoon, rarely giving them time to dwell on the ball when in possession and always ready to take them on with the ball at his feet.’
      • ‘Michael Brodie roared out a warning to the rest of the world's featherweights: ‘I'm ready to take you on!’’
      • ‘Several opponents took him on; more often than not, they ended up worse for wear.’
      • ‘And even they liked it, came increasingly willingly to the slaughter, Posh and Becks, John Humphries, Germaine Greer, ready to take him on.’
      • ‘So it means that the low fare carrier in Australia can withstand one hell of a battle, and if Qantas wants to take us on, we're ready to take 'em on.’
      • ‘But he's a talk show host, so his opponents should take him on in public.’
      • ‘Her eyes narrowed, ‘Next time, you had better be damned sure that you are ready to take me on.’’
      • ‘And the only way to do that is to jog his memory and let him know I'm back… back and ready to take him on.’
      • ‘In the 400, Klochkova appears untouchable, but Hungary's Risztov may be ready to take her on.’
      • ‘And then he tells someone on the phone that ‘The president is ready to take Congress on.’’
      compete against, oppose, challenge, confront, face, fight, match oneself against, pit oneself against, vie with, contend against, contend with, battle against, battle with, struggle against, take up cudgels against, stand up to, go head to head against
      View synonyms
  • take something on

    • 1Undertake a task or responsibility, especially a difficult one.

      ‘whoever takes on the trout farm will have their work cut out’
      • ‘Whoever takes it on now has the fun task of rebuilding the party, just to be dumped a year out from the election.’
      • ‘York Archaeological Trust has been looking at how outlying areas could be explored and the task was taken on by York Archaeological Forum, a group of professional and amateur archaeologists who advise York Council.’
      • ‘Formulating a succinct and meaningful constructive agenda out of disparate protests is a feat unto itself for leftists, and I am not going to snub this formidable task by taking it on in the space remaining.’
      • ‘He dismisses the help of his own mates, takes his task on alone, and in doing so attempts again to find the impossible-a place between social worlds, a quest that time and time again ends in death.’
      • ‘Administrative tasks will be taken on by support staff so teachers can concentrate on teaching and a pupil researcher will be appointed to monitor progress.’
      • ‘It was a huge administrative task and Sanderson took it on with extraordinary zeal, travelling all over the country, interviewing candidates for regional posts and trying to bring opposing factions together.’
      • ‘Finding another studio willing to take the project on proved difficult.’
      • ‘Members of the TRA appealed to local residents for help and, despite an initial flood of interest, the daunting task was taken on and successfully completed by only eight members.’
      • ‘Repairing this damage, and returning to the centre ground, seem like an almost impossible, and thankless task, for whoever takes it on.’
      • ‘I took the responsibility on because I was convinced that it would be easier than it has turned out to be.’
      accept, take up, take on, undertake
      undertake, accept, take on oneself, tackle, turn one's hand to, adopt, assume, shoulder, embrace, acquire, carry, bear, support
      View synonyms
    • 2Acquire a particular meaning or quality.

      ‘the subject has taken on a new significance in the past year’
      • ‘On a trip to the ground last Wednesday, the wind took on the properties of a giant cutlass.’
      • ‘It is then that Jacobsen's controversial account takes on the tone of a cheap airport thriller.’
      • ‘From that momentous day, Muir's already awesome influence took on a fresh sheen.’
      • ‘In the process of translation and adaptation, Verdi's opera took on qualities of its own.’
      • ‘Indeed their joint instincts occasionally took on an almost telepathic dimension.’
      • ‘Her version takes on added resonance and power when you remember that Tori is herself a victim of male violence.’
      • ‘Along the way, we will also come to an understanding of why labour took on the importance it did for Marx.’
      • ‘When followers are taken into account, the hunt takes on the character of a spectator sport.’
      • ‘It was a city where Baudelaire's vision of the artist of modern life took on a new urgency.’
      • ‘As the running battle was fought along the seafront, the scene took on a surreal sense.’
      acquire, assume, come to have, come by
      View synonyms
  • take someone out

    • 1Escort someone to a social event or place of entertainment.

      ‘I took her out to dinner the following night’
      • ‘Swanson had repeatedly called Donna, bought her gifts, and taken her out on expensive dates - active steps that the court ruled lured her away from marital bliss and culminated in divorce.’
      • ‘See, apparently I made the mistake in assuming that since I've taken Cat out almost every day this week, that would mean we were actually going out.’
      • ‘So tell me, is this date better than anything Justin has taken you out on?’
      • ‘Brandon had taken her out on numerous dates, but it just didn't feel the same.’
      • ‘You did not have to come on the other dates I have taken you out on.’
      • ‘He asked me one time if I had taken you out on a date yet.’
      • ‘Nate had taken Mia out several times.’
      go out with, escort, partner, accompany, go with
      View synonyms
    • 2Respond to a bid or double by one's partner by bidding a different suit.

      ‘most players would take their partners out into 4♥ on these hands’
      • ‘A wonderful agreement is that if you take out partner's 3 NT to 4 of a previously bid minor, you are making a slam try in the minor, and if partner then bids 4 NT, this is negative, to play.’
  • take someone/something out

    • Kill, destroy, or disable someone or something.

      • ‘And if somebody wants to take you out and creates an assassination contract on your head, then the hitman gets your picture to familiarize himself with the face he's to kill.’
      • ‘I don't see him getting hit, but I do see him bungling an order to take someone out, and getting himself killed.’
      • ‘No matter how safe a driver you are, you can be taken out by someone else's bad driving.’
      • ‘You caused a big uproar a few weeks ago when you suggested the U.S. should just simply take him out, should simply kill him.’
      • ‘A huge number of the group around Muqrin were taken out last night - killed or arrested.’
      • ‘The fighters who tried to take him out, he killed with his speed by taking advantage of their mistakes and countering them off a miss.’
      • ‘Nothing beats getting 10-15 kills before someone eventually takes me out!’
      • ‘It is neither our intention nor in our interest to take him out or assassinate him.’
      • ‘‘I agree with you on principle,’ Brenner said, ‘but it's not worth sending a young man to kill himself to take O'Dell out.’’
      • ‘Worst of all, if the agency concluded that she didn't intend to go through with the assassination, they would take her out.’
      kill, murder, assassinate, put to death, do away with, put an end to, get rid of, dispatch, execute, finish off, eliminate, exterminate, terminate
      View synonyms
  • take something out

    • 1Obtain an official document or service.

      ‘you can take out a loan for a specific purchase’
      • ‘If a debt has already been amassed and your repayments are impossible to meet, talk to your bank manager about taking out a personal loan.’
      • ‘More people are taking out interest-only mortgages, but they could face big debts if house prices fall further.’
      • ‘Williams is also $120,000 in debt from a series of bank loans he took out to finance the development of Broadcast 2000.’
      • ‘Many years ago I took out a personal loan to buy a decent second-hand car.’
      • ‘Afraid to own up to the truth, she takes out a huge loan and buys a replica to return to her rich friend.’
      • ‘When you go to a bank, although it might be called a car loan you're actually taking out a personal loan with the bank.’
      • ‘Anthony thanked the main sponsors and all the people who took out advertisements.’
      1. 1.1Get a licence or summons issued.
        • ‘According to a source, the pair took out a license on Tuesday morning.’
    • 2Buy food at a cafe or restaurant for eating elsewhere.

      ‘he ordered a lamb madras to take out’
      • ‘I really wanted a milkshake and ordered one to take away.’
      • ‘If you are just running in to get something to take out, it's okay - the burger was awesome, the fries were old, and the soda was soda.’
  • take something out on

    • Relieve frustration or anger by attacking or mistreating (a person or thing not responsible for such feelings).

      • ‘Instead, I took my anger out on her, my frustrations, purely because she was there.’
      • ‘But she should be the last person he should be taking his frustrations out on.’
      • ‘I'm sure you missed having some one to take your anger out on.’
      • ‘Then at least I'll have something to take my anger out on.’
      • ‘And when you're the defendant and you're the only one that they can take that anger out on, you're going to pretty much always get convicted.’
      • ‘Chin's attackers were angry about not being able to find jobs in the auto industry and - mistakenly believing that he was Japanese - took their anger out on him.’
      • ‘Then she found out her grandmother, her primary caretaker, was dying of cancer and she took her anger out on the only person she had: me.’
      • ‘Children are soft targets and easy to take frustrations out on.’
      • ‘I don't know, I am a bit of a soft target to take your anger out on, don't you think?’
      • ‘I guess that was why you took your anger out on all those guys.’
  • take something over

    • 1Assume control of something.

      ‘British troops had taken over the German trenches’
      • ‘On December 17, 1943, residents were forced to leave the village near Warminster when it was taken over for training US troops in the Second World War.’
      • ‘Anisminic Ltd was a British mining company which had owned property in Egypt, but during the Suez Crisis in 1956 the property was taken over by Israeli troops and £500,000 worth of damage was caused to it.’
      • ‘But again, I think they want to control their case, and when the media starts taking it over and the ‘Enquirer’ is the one breaking news on evidence, then they've got a problem.’
      • ‘We can be attracted to that other, wishing to possess it, control it, or take it over and make it part of ourselves: this is passion.’
      • ‘Considering the fact if an airliner is taken over, and the pilot is no longer in control of the aircraft, the US Government's option is to send up a couple of F - 15s to blast the airliner from the sky.’
      • ‘East Timor, a former Portuguese colony, was invaded in 1975 by Indonesian troops, with 200,000 of its citizens killed before it was taken over.’
      • ‘They just wanted to have our troops invade it and take it over.’
      • ‘The new struggle is the sort that is happening in Iraq, where resources have been taken over and people are struggling to gain back local control of them.’
      • ‘Officers said that the perimeter of the cathedral was controlled by police, but the inside of the church had been taken over by Rock Steady.’
      • ‘Let's invade the country and take it over so they know where they can kill our troops.’
      assume control of, take control of, gain control of, take charge of, take command of, assume responsibility for
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1(of a company) buy out another.
        ‘his new company took over his old one’
        • ‘British Land first acquired an interest in the York properties in 1997 before taking them over completely.’
        • ‘My wife and I got some money from First Active shares earlier this year when the company was taken over and we haven't done anything about capital gains tax.’
        • ‘In the technology world, this is not your classic merger where the acquirer nukes 90% of the staff of the acquired company and basically takes it over.’
        • ‘It acquired 20% of Montedison with the idea of taking it over, extracting the power company and part-financing the deal through disposals of Montedison's other assets.’
        • ‘The management team had been together for a good number of years and we felt it was an appropriate time to take it over.’
        • ‘At this stage, it's not clear what CH's plan for the satellites is - assuming it does indeed take them over.’
        • ‘In such a scenario he said the Israelis could end up with full control of the company without paying to take it over.’
        • ‘Mr Woodhead ran Standard Fireworks in Huddersfield until a Hong Kong company took it over and moved production to China, blaming excessive factory controls in this country.’
        • ‘We remain interested in taking it over as a community-owned facility so we can more appropriately care for it but there is no way we can pay big sum of money for it.’
        • ‘In the late 1990s the paper was taken over by the Alpha Newspaper group, which is controlled by former Ulster Unionist MP and Stormont cabinet minister John Taylor, now Lord Kilclooney.’
      2. 1.2Become responsible for a task in succession to another.
        ‘he will take over as chief executive in April’
        • ‘It should also be noted that GPs are absolved of their responsibilities when the care is taken over by a hospital.’
        • ‘The control of pollution functions were taken over by the National Rivers Authority and consolidated in the Water Resources Act 1991.’
        • ‘Elders who formerly controlled distribution of land within the family and household lost some of this control, as it was taken over increasingly by outsiders with political clout.’
        • ‘All border controls were taken over by the Bundesgrenzschutz.’
        • ‘Eventually, these simple, repetitive tasks were taken over by newly designed machines.’
        • ‘The 173d Airborne Brigade escorted Air Force fuel from Mosul to Kirkuk until the task was taken over by the 101st Corps Support Group.’
        • ‘If necessary, part of the responsibility is taken over by the internal security troops.’
        • ‘When the UDC's property and responsibilities were taken over by Bradford Council in 1974, the stones were left in the Ashlands Road cemetery, some piled on crates, with some of the others left standing against a wall.’
        • ‘The key to all of this is training troops and police forces to take that mission over.’
        • ‘City's finances were taken over by the State Financial Control Board.’
        deputize, act, act as deputy, substitute, act as substitute, act as stand-in, fill in, sit in, do duty, take over, act as understudy, act as locum, do a locum, be a proxy, cover, provide cover, hold the fort, step into the breach
        View synonyms
    • 2Printing
      Transfer text to the next line.

      • ‘But a syllable of two letters must not be taken over to the next line.’
  • take to

    • 1Begin or fall into the habit of.

      ‘he took to hiding some secret supplies in his desk’
      • ‘After an initial treatment elsewhere, he took to drinking again.’
      • ‘Once the local gossip was out of the way, she took to her usual habit of saying, ‘So what's new?’’
      • ‘Lorenzo Amoruso of Rangers seems to be an amiable sort of fellow so it was sad to read that, during a long injury lay-off, he fell into a depression and took to the drink.’
      • ‘They also took to the habit of calling me Charlie, even though it was no longer necessary.’
      • ‘The funding turned out to be chimerical; Förster panicked and took to drink.’
      • ‘A lot of people took to drink for solace, and drunkenness was often a problem.’
      • ‘To cope with the stress of sudden fame he took to drink, but these days never touches a drop.’
      • ‘Or take to relatively less harmful habits like drinking, smoking and gambling.’
      • ‘The latest and most amusing one was discovering two students who took to falling asleep in a lecture.’
      • ‘Ronnie and I took to drinking in a nationalist shebeen, the Old House.’
      make a habit of, resort to, turn to, have recourse to, begin, start
      View synonyms
    • 2Form a liking for.

      ‘Mrs Brady never took to Moran’
      • ‘He convinces her to go by promising a full congregation for her mission, and Sarah quickly takes to the milk drinks Sky orders for her.’
      • ‘Children could easily take to the world of 3D excitement offered here.’
      • ‘American mobile phone users are beginning to take to SMS, but IM may be the future for wireless messaging in the US.’
      • ‘Footballers are insular but they took to him very quickly.’
      • ‘So they easily take to the exercises, said participant Celine Chen.’
      • ‘Annette Salmeen was one of the UCLA athletes who took to the ideas quickly.’
      • ‘Martin seemed to do very well as a valet and Richard took to him easily which I was very happy to here.’
      • ‘Well Susie quickly took to the emo lifestyle, she already had pierced herself fourteen times by the end of the hour.’
      • ‘The advent of online lotteries had a bad effect on the State lottery, as fortune seekers began to take to the former.’
      • ‘Mainly because I think people will take to weblogs very quickly.’
      develop a liking for, like, get on with, become friendly with
      View synonyms
      1. 2.1Develop an ability for (something), especially quickly or easily.
        ‘I took to pole-vaulting right away’
        • ‘He shifted to left late last July and took to it quickly, improving rapidly in range and instincts.’
        • ‘Mr Wilstrop, 20, whose father often teaches the sport at the school, said the youngsters took to squash very quickly.’
        • ‘I took to figure skating with enthusiasm and began competing at the age of eight.’
        • ‘Frasier takes to the radio job at KACL with some enthusiasm and enjoys being a local celebrity.’
        • ‘What amazes me is how quickly they take to caring for an elderly person who has to be cleaned, dressed and sorted out.’
        • ‘He quickly took to the work and was even initiated into the Guild.’
        • ‘I went through several modules using games to explore mathematics, and they took to the work quickly.’
        • ‘He took to learning sign language quickly and was soon outpacing his mother and aunt.’
        • ‘Aaron and Luke took to it very quickly after that, but Nick and I just couldn't grasp it.’
        • ‘While some former cricket stars were good at commenting, others took to umpiring but for Kapil there is a greater joy in getting closer to people.’
        become good at, develop an ability for, develop an aptitude for, be suitable for
        View synonyms
    • 3Go to (a place) to escape danger or an enemy.

      ‘they took to the hills’
      • ‘The contrast with their hosts was enough to leave any Tartan Army foot soldier taking to the hills in fear.’
      • ‘Increasingly, Zambia's AIDS orphans attempt to escape their suffering by taking to the street.’
      • ‘Of course there is every chance that voters might literally take to the hills to escape such an election, but to my mind it is a risk worth taking.’
      • ‘As the lowlands dry up in spring, the nomads take to the hills to spend the summer months.’
      • ‘Shocked into a speechless stupor, Ibis took to the air to escape the horrible sight on the ground.’
      • ‘When the bombs started falling, the family took to an Anderson shelter and a garden shed.’
      • ‘Most able-bodied men fled, some running to the river on the west side, some taking to the hills to the east.’
      • ‘He had to take to the hills and it was from here that he blessed Ireland and all in it with two exceptions, snakes and the Red Bog.’
      • ‘To escape, Nancy takes to the road to hitchhike out of the situation.’
  • take someone up

    • Adopt someone as a protégé.

      • ‘To the Edinburgh literati who took him up after the success of his Kilmarnock edition of 1786 he played up to the image of the ‘heaven-taught ploughman’ as created by that second-rate poetaster Henry Mackenzie.’
      • ‘Most of the people wintering in Jamaica at that time were rich, elderly Americans, and we were taken up by some of them, including Adele Astaire, the sister and one-time dancing partner of Fred.’
  • take something up

    • 1Become interested or engaged in a pursuit.

      ‘she took up tennis at the age of 11’
      • ‘She told me last week she once did kick-boxing and was interested in taking it up again when she moves to Sheffield!’
      • ‘I don't have a single friend who's not interested in listening to music or taking it up himself.’
      • ‘Mr Frost contacted Counsel and Care after reading about its national campaign to encourage older people to continue their artistic pursuits, or take them up for the first time.’
      • ‘Mostly good weather favoured the event for the three weeks when outdoor pursuits could be taken up.’
      • ‘‘Those interested in taking up careers in flying can take this hobby up,’ he said.’
      • ‘Extended versions of the course are also on offer for anybody taking it up as a full-time career like Jennifer Lopez in the hit film The Wedding Planner.’
      • ‘Watching opera on television and attending live opera performances got her interested in taking it up as a career.’
      • ‘He exerted great influence on a number of other mathematicians who joined him at Kiev, and his interests were taken up by others there, particularly Bukreev.’
      • ‘Her father had agreed to take him on as a student so he could learn more about jazz music, since he had just begun taking it up.’
      • ‘Those interested in keeping fit and those who plan to take it up as a career can join the classes for a fee of Rs.1,750.’
      become involved in, become interested in, engage in, participate in, take part in, practise, follow
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Begin to hold or fulfil a position or post.
        ‘he left to take up an appointment as a missionary’
        • ‘Initially,he had applied for an advertised job of book-keeper at the RAOB, also know as the Buffs Club, but could not take it up.’
        • ‘Then Wiun takes his post up on the arena's catwalk, amidst the media, the announcers, disc jockey, and many other members of the crew.’
        • ‘A keen artist, Carli, who went to Huby primary school and Easingwold School, had been offered a place at York College, but couldn't take it up because she had a relapse of her ME.’
        • ‘The Authors took their positions up around the Square, pages fluttering rapidly in their shivering hands.’
        • ‘While he was there he received an offer of a Chair of Mathematics at the University of Poznan, and was awaiting approval of the post by the Ministry of Education so that he could take it up at the beginning of the 1939-40 academic year.’
        • ‘The real Charlie takes his position up behind Forrest and allows him to fire, thoroughly destroying his copies and leaving rather nasty looking impact marks in the arena.’
        • ‘He was offered appointments but did not take them up.’
        • ‘Part of the problem, Mr Adams said, was that there was no traffic warden patrolling for more than a year before he took the post up in July.’
        • ‘If the agreement held, the positions in the new government would be taken up and elections held within a year.’
        • ‘But its reasoning in paragraph 13 shows that it was only addressing its mind to the different argument that, had another job been offered, her illness would have prevented her taking it up and continuing in it.’
      2. 1.2Accept an offer or challenge.
        • ‘I believe it is harder, in this culture at this time, to write well about characters who do good, and so I believe that is a challenge thrown down before a writer, and I try to take that challenge up in my own way.’
        • ‘So many couples took the city up on its surprise offer that, by late afternoon, overwhelmed officials told new applicants to return yesterday.’
        • ‘He says he was offered oil, but did not take it up and repeatedly told them he was not interested.’
        • ‘I took the train up in the morning, spent three hours or so doing the usual rounds of presentation and schmoozing, and then I thought I would take my host up on her offer to see the sights.’
        • ‘It is in all our interests that his invitation is taken up.’
        • ‘The right of selection by aptitude is open to specialist arts, sports, music, modern language and technology schools, although in practice not all take it up.’
        • ‘There is of course no end of endless hand-wringing of the pay-the-piper/call-the-tune variety when public officials take private interests up on their hospitality.’
        • ‘Should he take the governor up on what is apparently a serious suggestion that the two of them debate?’
        • ‘Nine or 10 of the lads, myself included, took the manager up on his kind offer.’
        • ‘Indeed, I suggest that if the Government offered Ngati Tuwharetoa who are living in the Bay of Plenty now an opportunity to exchange their position for what they had then, very few would take it up.’
        accept, take up, take on, undertake
        accept, say yes to, agree to, accede to, adopt, get, gain
        View synonyms
    • 2Occupy time, space, or attention.

      ‘I don't want to take up any more of your time’
      • ‘Vincent is a grower and contractor and at this time of the year in particular his time is taken up completely in the harvesting of beet.’
      • ‘The rest of that building will be taken up with some retail space, a small number of offices, possibly a hotel, and conference facilities.’
      • ‘But many who currently sit in the Main Stand are angry that similar seats will not be available at the new stadium, because the space is taken up with expensive executive seats.’
      • ‘It is clear from the wording of s. 84 that the list of matters that may be relevant is not intended to be exhaustive, and it is in the discussion of the nature of the public interest that much of the investigative time is taken up.’
      • ‘If you divide the number of lines, 30,000, by the number of working days, you get about twelve lines to be learnt each day, though much time is taken up for practising and rehearsing what has been learnt before.’
      • ‘Phil Burgess, group main board director of Emerson, Orbit's parent company, told the committee that only four per cent of the floor space would be taken up with the goods restricted by the covenant.’
      • ‘The remainder of the album is taken up by particularly appropriate couplings.’
      • ‘Zhechev's first day in the post was taken up with appointing referees for the matches in the eighth round of the championship.’
      • ‘Most of the afternoon was taken up in Oxford, where I had a hair appointment.’
      • ‘The other hundred pages are taken up by an afterword by Executive Producer Robbie Stamp offering an useful insights into the script development.’
      consume, fill, absorb, use, use up, occupy
      View synonyms
    • 3Pursue a matter later or further.

      ‘he'll have to take it up with the bishop’
      • ‘If any members of the health board or the health board itself want to take it up with me, I will meet them anywhere, any place.’
      • ‘I decided not to take it up - too soon and no need - but it's an interesting idea.’
      • ‘I am going to take it up with Roundway parish council and I know that other players are going to complain to their councillors.’
      • ‘‘I'd be very interested in taking it up and I'd like to invite representatives from this firm to come along and talk at our Parochial Church Council meeting about it,’ said Captain Wheatley.’
      • ‘I'll take it up with you over a cocktail tonight if you're downtown.’
      • ‘This is a matter for us to consider and we will take it up with the principals concerned.’
      • ‘If the matter is not resolved locally, the associations could take it up with Garda Headquarters.’
      • ‘You will be starting a bit earlier today, if that is a problem, take it up with Master Shay.’
      • ‘If you wish to change legislation, why don't you take it up with the relevant authority?’
      • ‘I'll be interested to see if other papers take it up, because that column goes out with the Wrap, which is now a subscription-only service.’
      1. 3.1Resume speaking after an interruption.
        ‘I took up where I had left off’
        • ‘He simply took up where he'd left off before I had so rudely interrupted him.’
        resume, recommence, restart, begin again, carry on, continue, carry on with, pick up, return to
        View synonyms
    • 4Shorten a garment by turning up the hem.

      • ‘I'm looking to take them up, in and shorten the sleeves.’
      shorten, make shorter, turn up
      View synonyms
  • take someone up on

    • 1Challenge or question a speaker on (a particular point)

      ‘the interviewer did not take him up on his quotation’
      • ‘But I have to take you up on your question - your question to Frank Rich.’
    • 2Accept (an offer or challenge) from someone.

      ‘I'd like to take you up on that offer’
      • ‘I am delighted I took him up on his very kind offer.’
      • ‘You know we've been sitting here all day just waiting for some handsome cowboy to come save us and you know not a one has took us up on the offer.’
      • ‘I took Slooh up on their offer of a test drive, and here's what I found.’
      • ‘Fortunately, I don't have time to take her up on her offer, so Amherst audiences were mercifully spared.’
      • ‘When we took them up on their kind offer the next day, they went one step further and Jim said, ‘Hell, take the Buick!’’
      • ‘The ad promoted six-month subscriptions to the Post by offering six movie tickets to people who took them up on the offer.’
      • ‘She took me up on the offer (not so much for my winning personality, but more for the fact that her parents can be a little overpowering more often than not).’
      • ‘As it is rare for James to actually make an effort to speak or spend time with me, and although I felt like having a sleep, I took him up on the offer.’
      • ‘I realized how stupid I was acting and decided to take him up on the offer, silently accepting the pudding snack.’
      • ‘A single Frenchman took him up on the offer, and Travis was true to his word.’
  • take up with

    • Begin to associate with (someone), especially in a way disapproved of by the speaker.

      ‘he's taken up with a divorced woman, I understand’
      • ‘The narcissism of the pervert, who is interested in sex only as extreme sensation nurtured in solitary fantasy, is best illustrated by a vulgar movie star Charlotte takes up with in season three.’
      • ‘As the film begins, she dumps him and takes up with one of his younger, upwardly-mobile colleagues.’
      • ‘At 21, Caroline took up with Philippe Junot, a feckless playboy 17 years her senior.’
      • ‘Thrice-married screen legend takes up with 19-year-old starlet?’
      • ‘I moved to Toronto and took up with a crew of no-nukes anarchists.’
      • ‘Willcox is 42, but will make a convincing Dora Maar, the half-French, half-Yugoslavian woman who was 29 when she took up with the 54-year-old artist in 1936.’
      • ‘Maggie takes up with and marries Prince Amerigo, an impecunious Italian nobleman with a wreck of a castle in his homeland.’
      • ‘After splitting from his producer wife, Polly Platt, after The Last Picture Show, he took up with its star, Cybill Shepherd.’
      • ‘In 1984, during what was supposed to be Juliet's junior year of high school, she dropped out for good, took up with a girlfriend, moved to a skanky part of town, and started delivering pizza to pay for pot, coke, and lots of alcohol.’
      • ‘‘I wouldn't mind taking up with up with her,’ another chuckled.’
      become friendly with, become friends with, go around with, go along with, fall in with, join up with, string along with, get involved with, start seeing
      View synonyms

Origin

Late Old English tacan ‘get (especially by force), capture’, from Old Norse taka ‘grasp, lay hold of’, of unknown ultimate origin.

Pronunciation

take

/teɪk/