Definition of tailplane in English:

tailplane

noun

British
  • A horizontal aerofoil at the tail of an aircraft.

    • ‘During this visit they also decided to build a new tailplane and new control surfaces.’
    • ‘While dimensionally and aerodynamically identical to the original tailplane, the new tail slashes the parts count from 240 parts to only 60.’
    • ‘In a hangar at the famous wartime air base of Duxford, near Cambridge, fuselages, wings, tailplanes and assorted struts and piping are carefully cleaned, X-rayed, repaired and tested by Historic Flying's engineers.’
    • ‘This consisted of the standard scheme with the addition of yellow and orange stripes to the rear of the fuselage and tailplane.’
    • ‘The fuselage is of light metal construction and parts of the tailplane are of composite structure in order to reduce radar signature.’
    • ‘These follow-on tests might only be conducted on specific sections of the aircraft - such as a tailplane or wing - to gather additional information if operations indicated they were needed.’
    • ‘A group of fighters are destroyed in seconds by a mysterious red Mig - 29 with a devil insignia on the tailplane.’
    • ‘Other factors such the lift provided by the fuselage, tailplane and control surfaces, were ignored.’
    • ‘The stabiliser, the horizontal surface on the tailplane, is jammed.’
    • ‘The cantilever all-metal tail has a hydraulically powered rudder and single-piece all-moving tailplane.’

Pronunciation

tailplane

/ˈteɪlpleɪn/