Definition of surtax in English:

surtax

noun

  • An additional tax on something already taxed, especially a higher rate of tax on incomes above a certain level:

    ‘a 10 per cent surtax on incomes of more than $100,000’
    • ‘Recently Mayor Pierre Bourque announced that the surtax on Montreal's downtown parking lots should be raised by 10 per cent.’
    • ‘If we are to have this quaint surtax on upward mobility, at least let's make it open and a boon to the community at large.’
    • ‘He raised school taxes and brought in a new surtax on expensive homes and vehicles.’
    • ‘They are supported mainly by transfers - a surtax on West German income that is transferred to the East Germans.’
    • ‘One idea is a new surtax on production that would rise each year until the sum of royalties plus the surtax would equal 50%.’
    • ‘In many states a temporary surtax on personal income taxes is probably the optimal answer, when contingency funds are inadequate and prudent spending reductions have been exhausted.’
    • ‘The announcement of a 15 per cent surtax on cigarettes, oysters and live swine from the United States came Thursday, just as the European Union took similar measures.’
    • ‘The Liberal budget reduced personal income, capital gains and corporate tax rates, and announced the phased elimination of a surtax on higher income Canadians, but it made no mention of the regressive Goods and Services Tax.’
    • ‘One has to wonder whether the Labour Party remembers who put the surtax on, who brought in asset testing against the elderly, and who removed the elderly as a priority from hospital waiting lists.’
    • ‘Sure, I remember the surtax Congress imposed to support the rich.’
    • ‘It's actually the same as if someone asked the City Council wherever Scalia lives to impose a special surtax on Scalia's property.’
    • ‘It increased the surtax to the highest level ever.’
    • ‘The province has the second-highest income tax rate on corporations and small businesses and the highest surtaxes on high-income earners.’
    • ‘There is no draft to provide soldiers for the war, there is no income tax surtax to pay for the war, and neither is even remotely likely.’
    • ‘We are referring, of course, to the superannuation surtax and the actual level of superannuation payments.’
    • ‘For 2002, the 5-percent surtax, which phases out the benefit of the graduated rates, and the tax rates exceeding 50 percent are repealed.’
    • ‘More than $50,000 in net taxable income is subject to an additional 3.35% surtax.’
    • ‘During World War II, we had surtaxes, not tax cuts.’
    • ‘The surtax of 45 per cent to alleviate unemployment drove a wedge between rural France and Paris, further fuelling class tensions.’
    • ‘He was part of an administration that sold public assets and ruthlessly broke firm electoral pledges, such as that on the superannuation surtax.’

Origin

Late 19th century: from French surtaxe (see sur-, tax).

Pronunciation:

surtax

/ˈsəːtaks/