Definition of superpose in English:

superpose

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Place (something) on or above something else, especially so that they coincide.

    ‘a border of superposed triangles’
    • ‘The easiest way to tell whether a molecule is chiral or not is to try to superpose it on its mirror image.’
    • ‘A sequence of electrons in these superposed states gives you much more subtle information - quantum information.’
    • ‘Typically we would superpose a vast number of different computations - potentially more than there are atoms in the universe - and then bring them together by quantum interference to get a result.’
    • ‘In a quantum system, two opposite magnetic spins can be superposed upon each other, resulting in a third, in-between state.’
    • ‘For example, the displacement of a solid linear brick element's node is a 3-component spatial vector, and the model's overall displacement is often displayed by superposing the deformed shape over the undeformed shape.’
    • ‘The global flexibility of the proteins was measured by calculating the average structure for each simulation and then superposing each frame onto the average structure and calculating the RMSD.’
    • ‘The windowing technique captured simulated sinusoidal and step changes in cell migration superposed on a persistent random walk in simulated cell movement.’
    • ‘This was done by superposing two sets of data of the type used up to this point, where rotations were taking place in opposite directions (the total number of particles in each frame was ~ 400).’
    • ‘Involvement of any mechanical force that may be superposed on the diffusion to enhance the releasing process has not been elucidated to date.’
    • ‘In particular, the early parts of cumulative emergence curves at a range of temperatures were superposed when expressed in thermally weighted time, while the late parts diverged.’
    • ‘A stretch superposed on the low force level resulting from shortening deactivation can again trigger SA, recovering the prerelease isometric force.’
    • ‘The pollinia of these species are also noteworthy for being linear to oblong, equally long and parallel to each other, not superposed, obovate to rotund and heterogeneous in size.’
    • ‘After energy minimization, the deformed protein structures can be superposed on the native structure to determine in which direction the probed residue moved.’
    • ‘The peptide backbones superpose best at positions 3 and 6.’
    • ‘In order to find a possible relation between transparency and thickness, I have made photographs in which portions of the photographic plate were covered with layers of tin-foil, varying in the number of sheets superposed.’
    • ‘The stability of each domain was examined by superposing each domain of each frame of the trajectory onto itself in the first frame.’

Origin

Early 19th century: from French superposer, from super- above + poser to place.

Pronunciation:

superpose

/suːpəˈpəʊz/