Definition of submersion in English:

submersion

noun

mass noun
  • The action or state of submerging or being submerged.

    ‘five small islands threatened by submersion’
    • ‘She then transferred to Sydney, where in a deepwater berth she was placed on the deck of the Swan, a ship capable of partial submersion to enable vessels to be floated on to her and raised out of the water as the Swan is pumped out.’
    • ‘We also conducted field tests of unattached transmitters to determine how antenna position and submersion in water and mud affected radio detectability and signal strength.’
    • ‘Despite their superficial similarity, submersion of minorities in English-only programs in the USA and Canadian immersion programs are different and they lead to different results.’
    • ‘After long hours of submersion in the sky and the waters, I reached my head forward slowly, my neck muscles sore, to see my own reflection in the water.’
    • ‘If such a seizure occurs while a person is swimming, the average body density may become higher than the density of the water, causing rapid submersion.’
    • ‘She had a sickening feeling of true flying for a moment before the shocking cold and utterly claustrophobic feeling of submersion in water enveloped her.’
    • ‘He had learned during his time in the service how to control his body's response to the cold of that first submersion.’
    • ‘Took almost two hours submersion and exercise in hot water to loosen them up.’
    • ‘What's more it's claimed to survive submersion in water for at least 30 minutes.’
    • ‘If the joint or crack is in an area that will be subjected to particularly difficult stress, such as continual water submersion at the bottom of a swimming pool, it is important to use a primer before caulking.’
    • ‘Our transmitters varied in signal strength in response to position of antenna and submersion in water and mud; however, preliminary field tests indicated that these effects were minimal for aerial monitoring.’
    • ‘The observation that seizures result in expulsion of air from the lungs, thereby increasing the density of the body and promoting submersion, makes logical sense, even though there may be no research.’
    • ‘The effects of 55 years' submersion were apparent from the rusting of plates and fittings and the sponges and soft corals encrusting much of the superstructure.’
    • ‘The analogy between cerebral protection with deep hypothermia, and cold water submersion, now becomes obvious.’
    • ‘The fat layer kept them warm and buoyant, their secretions prevented build-up of excess salt from sea water and their larynx was protected against submersion.’
    • ‘There have been extraordinary examples of survival after long periods of submersion in ice cold water.’
    • ‘The windlass lies unaffected by more than a century of submersion.’
    • ‘A rise in the Mediterranean sea level and sudden submersion caused by earthquakes or climate changes could explain the annihilation of the cities, he said.’
    • ‘He submitted that the meaning of the phrase cannot simply be merged with the requirement for complete crystal submersion in the silicone layer, as that would render it otiose.’
    • ‘This penchant, by virtue of its constant prostration and submersion of self into the shallow tributary streams of Western cultural hegemony, debases the vocabulary of black culture.’

Pronunciation

submersion

/səbˈməːʃn//səbˈməːʒn/