Definition of submarine in English:

submarine

Pronunciation /sʌbməˈriːn//ˈsʌbməriːn/

noun

  • 1A warship with a streamlined hull designed to operate completely submerged in the sea for long periods, equipped with a periscope and typically armed with torpedoes or missiles.

    • ‘As well as British ships in the area for support, sources say two British submarines armed with cruise missiles have also been made available for any attack.’
    • ‘The PRC is working on more advanced designs for both submarines and submarine-fired missiles.’
    • ‘RAF fighters and Royal Navy submarines firing cruise missiles were also involved alongside US warships and warplanes.’
    • ‘On the walls of primary schools are large diagrams of submarines and warships built in St Petersburg, showing the torpedo compartments with illustrations of how torpedoes are fired.’
    • ‘Beyond this is the outermost sea space, where the navy would operate shore-based naval aircraft and submarines with ship-to-ship missiles.’
    • ‘The Chinese navy now buying sophisticated Russian warships and submarines.’
    • ‘It could mean the warships and submarines of the future would be more effective, would be better places for their crews to live and work on, and would be built and operated at a lower cost to the taxpayer.’
    • ‘As a hunter-killer, she was designed to detect enemy submarines and destroy them using torpedoes.’
    • ‘It is common now for Orthodox priests to baptize and sanctify warships, submarines, missiles, and tanks.’
    • ‘All Trident Ploughshares protesters, who have broken into Faslane to attack Trident submarines, have been armed with hammers designed to destroy the subs' sensitive computer equipment.’
    • ‘A British ballistic missile submarine has fired torpedoes at an American destroyer - all for the sake of research.’
    • ‘So its presence in areas of responsibility of missile armed submarines is subject to strict regulation.’
    • ‘These ships were to be supported by six torpedo-boat destroyers, two submarines and support ships.’
    • ‘Since the 1960s, the submarine armed with nuclear missiles has become the single most potent embodiment of sea power.’
    • ‘The submarine is equipped with a Kollmorgen search-and-attack periscope.’
    • ‘To avert this situation, and ultimately to consolidate strategic stability, it is expedient to limit search activity against missile armed submarines.’
    • ‘The research is designed to determine the number of pygmy blue whales that visit the area, which is also popular with warships and submarines.’
    • ‘When battleships showed their prowess, submarines and torpedo boats were devised.’
    • ‘The number in the Pacific has since been halved with four of the Trident-missile-fitted submarines converted into conventionally armed cruise missile submarines.’
    • ‘Even the most hawkish leaders baulked at countenancing a right of pre-emptive action when the world's principal disputants both had nuclear missile submarines designed to evade a surprise attack.’
    1. 1.1 A submersible craft of any kind.
      • ‘Tall ships, small ships, pirate ships, submarines, rafts, and Viking longboats might all put in an appearance.’
      • ‘Parrots in the wardroom, Great Danes leading errant sailors home, prone penguins, reindeer wandering around submarines.’
      • ‘Inside the museum, all manner of detailed models, from submarines, steamboats and trawlers to battleships, tugs and cobles, competed for best model in the various classes.’
      • ‘There were a record number of entries from yellow submarines, tall ships, small ships, rafts, sea serpents, to shipwrecks and fishing boats and lots more besides.’
      • ‘And then they may not need us to send a submersible submarine down there.’
      • ‘A boatyard owner renting deep-sea submarines in Vancouver is also murdered, as is a man purchasing illicit rocket guide wires in London.’
      • ‘Knowing the location of all ships, planes and submarines (friendly, neutral or otherwise) is the ideal vision sought by FORCEnet.’
      • ‘Things like microwaves and hairdryers can be powered through inverters if you have the battery capacity of a submarine.’
      • ‘Are our submarines, submersibles and aqualungs not merely imitations of devices and mechanisms that Nature ‘invented’ a long, long time ago?’
      • ‘Ongoing development eventually transforms the ocean into one where great cities thrive and their inhabitants travel through submarines and similar submersible vehicles.’
  • 2North American

    another term for hoagie

adjective

  • Existing, occurring, or used under the surface of the sea.

    ‘submarine volcanic activity’
    • ‘Some of Nepad's major projects still in the pipeline include a fibre optic submarine cable on the East Coast to connect Durban and Djibouti and the Inga III project in the Congo.’
    • ‘Fixed surface platforms, submarine power cables and underwater tanks are all existing technology.’
    • ‘Thomson's continuing work on laying submarine telegraph cables took him to Madeira in 1873.’
    • ‘Wire communications facilities across the Philippine Islands linked the archipelago by submarine cable.’
    • ‘It was the view of the committee that, in these instances, the incidents had likely involved the fouling of submarine telecommunication cables or associated debris.’
    • ‘Orkney Islands Councillors have agreed to a further £200,000 towards the cost of a submarine fibre optic cable from the Scottish mainland via Orkney to Shetland.’
    • ‘Right now, these vertically integrated dinosaurs make everything from hard-disk drives to submarine cables.’
    • ‘The two large submarine canyons under investigation are Scripps Canyon and La Jolla Canyon.’
    • ‘These depocentres contain thick upper Maureen, Eista and Forties sands deposited in laterally extensive submarine fan systems with widespread confined channelling.’
    • ‘A system of submarine canyons developed on the slope during the Oligocene.’
    • ‘And yet echo-sounding maps of submarine topography continued to accumulate.’
    • ‘Communications with the main land, which had been a problem, were vastly improved when a start was made to connect the island with Normanville via submarine cable.’
    • ‘Other uses are found in agriculture and cable wrappings, including submarine cables.’
    • ‘Sand-rich turbidites from two Palaeocene submarine fan systems have very different heavy mineral stratigraphic styles.’
    • ‘Pilot whales can often be spotted resting in large pods at the ocean surface, yet very little is known about the submarine behavior of these deep-sea hunters.’
    • ‘In the same document, Esat also said that it had signed a contract with a major submarine cable company to construct a fibre optic submarine cable between Ireland and Britain.’
    • ‘Oceanic crust is thus created from the mantle at the crest of the mid-ocean ridge system, a volcanic submarine rise.’
    • ‘For a number of years the colonies had talked about a connection with Europe via a submarine cable which could be landed at Perth, Darwin or somewhere on the Queensland coast.’
    • ‘The scheme for managing international communications remained almost unchanged from the first telegraphic submarine cable until the mid-1970s.’
    • ‘The predominant feature of the shoreline is the rocky cliffs, extending under water to encompass a lush kelp forest, submarine reefs and offshore seamounts.’
    undersea, sub-aquatic, subaqueous
    View synonyms

Pronunciation

submarine

/sʌbməˈriːn//ˈsʌbməriːn/