verb

[WITH OBJECT]informal
  • 1Replace or be replaced; substitute.

    ‘he got a lot of applause when he was subbed’
    no object ‘he subbed for Armstrong at some gigs’
    • ‘But soon thereafter, McMurray subbed for the injured Sterling Marlin in Ganassi's No.40 Dodge and won at Charlotte.’
    • ‘Tony Braysford (centre midfield) Didn't get his foot on the ball enough and was subbed at the break.’
    • ‘Says Kenny Wallace, who subbed for Harvick, ‘This is like any other job.’’
    • ‘McMurray splashed onto the Cup scene in October 2002 when he subbed for an injured Sterling Marlin at Charlotte.’
    • ‘I didn't do myself justice against Sarries and was subbed, but unfortunately by the time Tim Walsh came on the game was out of our hands.’
    • ‘The DRC's Foreign Minister, Antoine Mangalibi, subbed for Kabila.’
    • ‘Without Terry, the starting job falls to Floyd Womack, who has subbed for Terry in four games this season.’
    • ‘Smith subbed for Chris Brown, who they announced was injured by Mike last week.’
    • ‘Rookie Isaiah Smith subbed for George Brown on a few series against the Falcons.’
    • ‘Gary was going to start a nighttime variety show weekly and I subbed one night.’
    • ‘He had been in the hospital and Roger had subbed for him.’
    • ‘Even though I filled in for Gallagher for only one day, while Treason author Ann Coulter subbed for two, I got three times as many emails from listeners about my show as she did about hers - nearly 900.’
    • ‘I subbed my way through several counties and taught in many different establishments from the ‘rough’ to the supposed ‘good’ schools.’
    • ‘Edwards was recalled but was subbed at half-time after dropping a clanger in the 2-0 defeat by Leyton Orient in October.’
    • ‘A year ago, Jamie McMurray subbed for the injured Sterling Marlin in Ganassi's Winston Cup car, and won in only his second start in the premier stock car division.’
    • ‘As for Brooks, who is very good on the PBS talking head circuit (I subbed for him a few years ago and I was a nervous wreck), more than anything else, I feel sad.’
    • ‘Jamie McMurray, who officially will be a rookie in 2003, won in only his second Winston Cup start as he subbed for Marlin, who was injured.’
    • ‘It reunited in 1996-with original bass player Glen Matlock subbing for his replacement, the late Sid Vicious - for a five-month world tour.’
    • ‘Wallace subbed for Johnny Benson, Nadeau's teammate, at Daytona last July when Benson was hurt.’
    • ‘He never really got into the game and was eventually subbed when Lee Cartwright, a natural in that role took over.’
    deputize, act as deputy, act as a substitute, fill in, sit in, stand in, act as stand-in, cover, act as locum, be a proxy, hold the fort
    View synonyms
  • 2British Lend or advance a sum to (someone) against expected income.

    ‘who'll sub me till Thursday?’
    • ‘The fact that the parsimonious queen subbed him no less than £58,000 between 1586 and 1603 suggests tacit acceptance.’
    • ‘They even give us free cakes or croissants with our tea now and in the past have subbed us on the office-run when we've come out without enough money.’
    • ‘He said ‘I'm gasping for a drink could you sub me some money.’’
    • ‘He hadn't got enough saved for it with having just been on holiday and he was trying to get his dad to sub him so that he could have it sooner rather than later.’
    lend, loan, credit, pay in advance, supply on credit
    View synonyms
  • 3Subedit.

    ‘his copy was mercilessly subbed and rewritten’
    • ‘I have really enjoyed subbing the paper as well.’
    • ‘It all starts with this post I wrote last week while subbing at the Daily Dish.’
    • ‘One of them was a sub-editor who subs my work a lot so I ask her what the problems with my writing are, and she gave me pretty good tips.’
    • ‘Glyn learned subbing the old fashioned way, with paper and pencils and funny little rulers that tell you how many spaces and letters can fit on a line, depending on the size of the type.’
    • ‘I wouldn't say that I was born to do this job, but there is a certain aspect of my personality that suits the pettiness & grammatical obsessions of subbing.’
    • ‘I spend half my time writing for it and most of the rest of the time subbing entries from people who visit the site.’
    • ‘Journalists had struck for one day over cuts and the centralisation of subbing across a number of titles.’
    • ‘Together we evolved a monthly theme, subbed, rewrote and proofed the magazine.’
    • ‘You've probably heard the term sub or subbing or sub-editor, but you may be unclear about what they actually do.’
    • ‘I'll just have to do as much as I can on an email so she can at least sub the copy, and then post the proofs back over the weekend.’
    • ‘Obviously the links weren't subbed at all well.’
    • ‘I could read Anne Lamott all day, but Barbara Ehrenreich - while I love her books - was just too lecture-y for me when she subbed for Tom Friedman.’
    • ‘Anyway, am subbing a couple of pieces on aphrodisiacs.’
    • ‘I certainly hope that if it's dubbed or subbed it'll be done respectfully and as accurately as possible.’