Definition of stylistic in English:

stylistic

adjective

  • Of or concerning style, especially literary style.

    ‘the stylistic conventions of magazine stories’
    • ‘But images of a free and easy stylistic pluralism should nevertheless be regarded with some caution.’
    • ‘Rushdie's borrowings from Dante consist of topographical and stylistic devices.’
    • ‘Balzac, according to this logic, had no stylistic dilemmas when he sat down to write.’
    • ‘Even his trademark style now reads more like a pastiche than a stylistic innovation.’
    • ‘We do not know who they are, but their identity is perhaps less important than their composure and stylistic attributes.’
    • ‘The literary celebration of a city was just one of many stylistic exercises practised by Bruni and his humanist associates.’
    • ‘In addition to vivid imagery, another shared stylistic trait is that of pastiche.’
    • ‘If audiences can get over a few stylistic tropes that define Indian cinema, then the sky's the limit.’
    • ‘Her artistry of story telling is welcome as it is thankfully free from any obtrusive stylistic aerobatics.’
    • ‘Hesiod's version shows some stylistic awkwardness and inconcinnity, but is not without power.’
    • ‘The spare, stripped set and minimal lighting are at odds with the apparently random stylistic touches.’
    • ‘Though he is predominantly a satirist, the main stylistic influence on his work is W. H. Auden.’
    • ‘He combines neo-romantic sentiments with stylistic features of both Modernism and Postmodernism.’
    • ‘The stylistic goal is for the work to function as a pulsating musical tribute.’
    • ‘The use of little notes scrawled on screen in the style of diary entries is a stylistic touch.’
    • ‘Now they aspire to emulate bland American actors whose defining stylistic features are shiny hair and nice, white teeth.’
    • ‘As a stylistic template, the power pop formula is simple and to the point, and followed here by Starky to the letter.’
    • ‘One of the amazing aspects of this stylistic tour de force is that every line of dialogue is sung.’
    • ‘I would like to see Cory, or others, recommending fiction with a broader stylistic range.’
    • ‘This is an impossibility that manifests itself first and foremost as a stylistic occlusion.’
    oratorical, linguistic, verbal
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 19th century: from stylist, suggested by German stilistisch.

Pronunciation

stylistic

/stʌɪˈlɪstɪk/