Main definitions of strop in English

: strop1strop2

strop1

noun

  • 1A device, typically a strip of leather, for sharpening razors.

    • ‘First there are the six years, age six to twelve, of being beaten severely once a week with a razor strop by his ex-soldier father.’
    • ‘That segued into a series of small sounds: another drawer opening and closing, the little splash of water and the quick slapping of a razor against a strop a time or two.’
    • ‘This can be done by rubbing away surplus metal with a grindstone, whetstone, oilstone, steel, ceramic rod, leather strop or the palm of your hand.’
    • ‘Dad was one that when he got mad at us, he hit us with a razor strop.’
    • ‘My father was typical - he didn't hesitate taking the razor strop to me.’
    • ‘He taught his sons the Bible and beat them with a razor strop.’
    1. 1.1also strapNautical A rope sling for handling cargo.
      • ‘‘Unfortunately we couldn't get him into the strop because of his injuries,’ he said.’
      • ‘AB Troy Norris from HMAS Coonawarra Naval Stores lowers the strops from a crane.’
      • ‘Having arrived at the payload you can begin to rig the lift using either rope or the supplied attachment strops.’
      • ‘The pilot ejected and Newcastle's sea boat was launched to help the aviator, arriving in time to help him into the winch strop of a Soviet rescue helicopter.’
      • ‘Our feet were jammed into strops, our hands wrapped around canvas handles.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Sharpen on or with a strop.

    ‘he stropped a knife razor-sharp on his belt’
    • ‘He'd seen her often in the past weeks: in the morning as he stropped his razor, in the evening as he wrung dingy water from his satin gloves.’
    • ‘We stropped our straight razors, brandished horsehair wands.’
    • ‘We'll do that by stropping, which work hardens this tiny filament and breaks it off.’
    sharpen, whet, make sharp, make sharper, hone, file
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘thong’, also as a nautical term): probably a West Germanic adoption of Latin stroppus ‘thong’.

Pronunciation

strop

/strɒp/

Main definitions of strop in English

: strop1strop2

strop2

noun

British
informal
  • usually in singular A bad mood; a temper.

    ‘Nathalie gets in a strop and makes to leave’
    • ‘The entire family was in a strop because of my sister.’
    • ‘Childhood birthday parties are made of sulks and strops, and are all the better for it.’
    • ‘Have they started sulking for England, throwing apoplectic strops, slamming bedroom doors that shake the house to its very foundations?’
    • ‘I can't find anybody with this exact problem, but I'm guessing it's to do with SATA drivers and XP having a strop.’
    • ‘This must rate as the Godzilla of all teen strops.’
    • ‘So she sent out a short email having a strop about things.’
    • ‘‘This from a woman who just did an Oscar winning strop,’ Adele mused as she got herself comfortable on the couch.’
    • ‘Throwing one of the strops for which he was famous, Michelangelo returned home to Florence in a state of apoplexy.’
    • ‘My strop has already been immortalised on this blog and it is unfair to bring it up again.’
    • ‘Dimtra pushed out her bottom lip in a strop, before she noticed the brown-haired Prince next to our father.’
    • ‘And she failed the group task by throwing a big strop.’
    • ‘The trademark guitars can still get in a strop, but mariachi horns and orchestral flourishes evoke Cinerama's widescreen dramas.’
    • ‘Mara looks very much taken aback, she steels her jaw, inhales sharply and stomps off in a strop.’
    • ‘I frowned and got off the bed in a strop and got changed.’
    • ‘For a strop that would have embarrassed a two year old, Jon Drummond should hang his head in shame.’
    • ‘Sulks and strops become the norm as alcopops and body piercings replace Barbie dolls and Action Men.’
    • ‘Simonsen's strop around his area, tapping his index finger to his head, was a desperate attempt to cast blame where it did not belong.’
    • ‘No wonder he has strops all over the place and is arrogant and self-obsessed.’
    • ‘Abby, as you can see, begins her teenage strops at a very early age!’
    • ‘When a stiff back and querulous bottom-lip signals a looming mini-starlet strop in daughter Caitlin, Mr Bear is immediately whipped out.’
    temper, fit of anger, fit of fury, fit of rage, fit of temper, fit of bad temper, fit of ill temper, towering rage, bad temper, pet, fit of pique, tantrum, fury, frenzy of anger, frenzy of rage, rampage, paroxysm of anger, paroxysm of rage, passion, bad mood, mood
    View synonyms

Origin

1970s: probably a back-formation from stroppy.

Pronunciation

strop

/strɒp/