Main definitions of strip in English

: strip1strip2

strip1

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Remove all coverings from.

    ‘they stripped the bed’
    • ‘Bearing in mind I had just stripped the beds - why do we always want clean sheets ‘for Christmas’?’
    • ‘The bed had been stripped all the way from the hangings to the bedwarmer.’
    • ‘I generally strip the bed and toss the sheets in the washer.’
    • ‘At least that sheet was there so it saved me stripping the whole bed off.’
    • ‘Then I took down all the nets, washed them, stripped the beds and put up my new curtains.’
    • ‘I noticed that when a patient was discharged the bed was stripped and wiped down with sterile cloth.’
    • ‘Many other servants came in to strip the bed and put new sheets and comforter on her monstrous bed.’
    • ‘She hit the button carelessly and continued to strip the bed, throwing her many pillows onto the carpet.’
    • ‘Quickly, she stripped her bed of the pillows, sheet and quilt before folding it back into a settee.’
    • ‘I stripped my bed of the familiar black bedspread and trudged back down the hall and to the stairs, after letting a loud yawn escape my mouth.’
    • ‘He stripped the bed and rolled the soiled coverlet about the night dress.’
    • ‘When she stepped out of her bathroom in new pajamas she quickly stripped her bed and pillow cases and replaced them.’
    • ‘Every morning each bed had to be stripped and remade with freshly ironed linen.’
    • ‘He then stripped the bed of its linen and fetched new sheets and pillow cases from the closet.’
    • ‘After the ependyma covering its ventricular surface is stripped away, the elongated caudate nucleus is exposed.’
    • ‘The sandy looking topsoil is stripped back to reveal its history.’
    • ‘The bed had been stripped but she could fix that.’
    • ‘However, I had partially stripped the bed yesterday in my efforts to find it, but obviously had not gone down quite far enough.’
    • ‘There is a scene at the end, after they have left, when the maid comes in to strip the beds.’
    • ‘‘He strips his own bed, does the vacuuming and makes his own pancakes,’ she said with a smile.’
    1. 1.1 Remove the clothes from (someone)
      with object and complement ‘the man had been stripped naked’
      • ‘A few months before that, a 13-year-old student was stripped naked and paraded down the halls of her school.’
      • ‘She looked down and realized that she was stripped naked.’
      • ‘They stripped us naked to make sure we weren't hiding anything else.’
      • ‘His head and eyebrows were shaved, and he was stripped to the waist.’
      • ‘There were bruises all over her body, and she had been stripped naked.’
      • ‘A feeding frenzy ensued - within minutes the unfortunate man was stripped of his clothes.’
      • ‘She already stripped him naked before the session.’
      • ‘Malcolm stood still as his servant proceeded to strip him naked and dress him in fairly complicated clothes.’
      • ‘They strip him naked throw him on the muddy track and tell him to run laps.’
      • ‘He was stripped of all clothes save for his shoes, the papers in his room in complete disarray.’
      • ‘I had never felt this naked, even when the pirates had stripped me for my cleaning earlier that very day.’
      • ‘He was stripped naked and dragged kicking and screaming to the lawn directly in front of City Hall.’
      • ‘You couldn't be more vulnerable if you were stripped naked and wheeled out on a trestle table for the waiting room to gawp at.’
      • ‘At one point a women was stripped to her bra in front of us.’
      • ‘The CSKA fans managed to strip their players almost naked, leaving them with nothing but their shorts.’
      • ‘The second time I was arrested, I was even stripped naked in a room in the regional Parliament in Banda Aceh.’
      • ‘And then they took me in another room and stripped me naked again.’
      • ‘And he tells the story how he was stripped naked by the Gestapo to see if he was circumcised.’
      • ‘Dorian stripped to shorts and a tank top and he was rock hard and dry.’
      • ‘I was stripped of my clothes, my innocence, and my life.’
    2. 1.2no object Take off one's clothes.
      ‘I was tempted to strip off for a swim’
      ‘she stripped down to her underwear’
      • ‘Surely she didn't expect her to strip in front of a complete stranger.’
      • ‘He was just going to wait for her to strip to her underwear.’
      • ‘The boys quickly stripped down to boxers and swan dived into the pond.’
      • ‘So they all stripped naked, this included all piercing, and placed their clothes on the table.’
      • ‘I stripped off to my boxers and curled up under the covers.’
      • ‘Once I get home, I strip off my clothes, toss them into the hamper and shower.’
      • ‘Despite his efforts, however, Gooden stripped to his underpants and jumped.’
      • ‘First, the women stripped, removing all clothing, jewelry and glasses; they were photographed while the men stayed clothed.’
      • ‘Apparently he didn't want to strip in front of hundreds of screaming girls.’
      • ‘The Marine continued stripping, removing his belt.’
      • ‘Quickly stripping down to my underwear and bra, I dashed towards my closet.’
      • ‘On an impulse you strip off all your clothes, swim into the centre of the lake and turn onto your back.’
      • ‘I stripped off my clothes and stepped in to a waterfall of hot water.’
      • ‘Realizing this, we strip off our clothes and dance through the yard.’
      • ‘I stripped sown to my bathing suit and ran towards the lake but I stopped suddenly at the edge.’
      • ‘Chris grinned and quickly stripped down to his plain black boxers before jumping into the hot tub.’
      • ‘He pulled out the warmest clothes he could find, tossing them on the bed before quickly stripping himself of his pajamas.’
      • ‘Is she the exhibitionist who stripped to her bra as she danced on the tables of pubs in Grimsby?’
      • ‘I slowly strip off my clothes and get into the hot shower.’
      • ‘He had stripped naked in an attempt to free himself from the pesky pests.’
      undress, strip off, take one's clothes off, remove one's clothes, shed one's clothes, unclothe, disrobe, strip naked, denude oneself, expose oneself, reveal oneself, uncover oneself
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3 Pull or tear off (a garment or covering)
      ‘she stripped off her shirt’
      figurative ‘strip away the hype and you'll find original thought’
      • ‘‘Black Mountain poetry is stripped bare of everything,’ an acolyte of Frank O'Hara said.’
      • ‘I stripped his shirt, and examined the deep wounds on his chest.’
      • ‘He sighed, too tired to think anymore, and stripped off his shirt.’
      • ‘Blood was on his jacket, and as he stripped his gloves off his hands, he stared at the three.’
      • ‘She stripped the dress off and ran to her dresser.’
      • ‘He stripped the suit off, so he was only wearing a pair of boxer shorts and a thin shirt.’
      • ‘I stripped my clothing off, donned a lab coat, and drove home where I left the clothes in the coal shed to ‘cool’ off.’
      • ‘Within seconds he stripped off the fancy garment and flung it at Sir Miley.’
      • ‘The acceleration strips the lining of the artery away faster than it can be replenished.’
      • ‘I rushed over to him, throwing my helmet off and stripping my gloves and jacket.’
      • ‘We use products that remove ‘bad’ oil and surface skin - thereby stripping away a crucial protective barrier.’
      • ‘She quickly stripped her shirt when she got into her bedroom and grabbed one from her walk in closet.’
      • ‘Then I took the wire cutters and stripped the casing off of the wire that was attached to the gate lock.’
      • ‘‘Anytime anywhere,’ Merrick sneered as he stripped his shirt and followed her in.’
      • ‘He stripped his coat off and marched down the empty hallway.’
      • ‘She stripped the sweater and jeans, and dumped them in her locker.’
      • ‘Several of the Marines stripped off their wet shirts and changed into their spares.’
      • ‘Upon stripping the dress from her lean body, Fionnabhair pulled the pants up around her hips and the tunic over her head.’
      • ‘His style got results very quickly, but it was also stripping the lining from his stomach.’
      • ‘He stripped the leather gloves from his hands and pounded his fist into his steel palm with a clanking thud.’
      • ‘Julie has tears streaming down her face; Blaze just looks at his little brother as he strips his shirt off.’
    4. 1.4 Remove bark and branches from (a tree).
      • ‘Wear marks on the tusks suggest they were used to strip bark from trees, and possibly to dig up plants.’
      • ‘The bird was at the very tip of a branch stripped bare of foliage.’
      • ‘Some have become overgrown, while others have been lost forever due to grazing animals stripping bark from the trees.’
      • ‘The bird strips the bark off dying trees with its powerful beak to get to insect grubs beneath.’
      • ‘To prepare the tree for the sculpting process its bark would first be stripped away.’
      • ‘She closed her great jaws over the tree and stripped the branches and leaves from the main trunk.’
      • ‘They strip bark off of dying trees with their powerful ivory-colored bills to reach the bugs and larvae beneath.’
      • ‘They strip the bark off trees to get at the sweet, sappy tissue underneath, damaging it badly.’
      • ‘A mature tree in Ballina's town park has been stripped of its bark and left to die after being attacked on Wednesday night last.’
      • ‘You might encounter one shoving over a tree or stripping it of leaves and bark.’
      • ‘She pulled a small branch off a tree and began stripping it of its leaves.’
      • ‘Six eucalypts were removed after metre wide sections of bark were stripped from the year-old trees in September last year.’
      • ‘We have a 4-month-old puppy that chewed and stripped the bark off a young cypress tree.’
      • ‘The wood, long ago stripped of its bark and made brittle by countless freezes, snaps and crumbles in his hand.’
      • ‘It used its large bill to strip the bark from trees that had recently died, exposing the beetle larvae that served as its dietary staple.’
      • ‘Mike, Jane, Steve and Tara volunteered to help me strip the tree.’
      • ‘I mean, the trees are stripped of their leaves and branches, but also the storm surge has had the most devastating result.’
      • ‘She'd tried to convince him to strip the bark off, but listened to reason when Jinx explained that the bark worked as kindling.’
      • ‘These creatures are so efficient that a colony of them can strip a citrus tree of its leaves in a single night.’
      • ‘Beavers fell trees, elephants trample plants, ants strip trees of bark, moles dig tunnels, and so the list goes on.’
    5. 1.5 Remove (paint or varnish) from (a surface)
      ‘the floorboards can be stripped, sanded, and polished’
      ‘strip off the existing paint’
      • ‘When the paint was stripped it revealed numerous scratches and old repairs.’
      • ‘Thinking quickly, Stephenson stripped the paint from his beer can, punched a hole in the bottom, and fixed it in place on the model.’
      • ‘The aim of the study was to find a cheaper and less hazardous way of removing lead paint than stripping the paint off the walls.’
      • ‘All the paint had to be stripped and the corrosion rectified.’
      • ‘They run out of beer by about 7pm so we then turned to the wine, which I'm afraid would have stripped the paint off any wall.’
      • ‘Use caution when stripping the paint from the pilot/step castings, as they are very fragile.’
      • ‘Next job is to strip the varnish from the neck, and sand it down to the wood.’
      • ‘If we are to develop a more realistic sense of place we will need to strip the varnish from some cherished myths about our island world.’
      • ‘I suspect that paint is being stripped in Wanganui.’
      • ‘In 1999, a man from Essex, southeast England, left four families on his street homeless while trying to strip paint in his house.’
      peel, remove, take off, flake, scrape, scratch, shave, abrade, rub, clear, clean
      View synonyms
    6. 1.6 Remove the stems from (tobacco).
      • ‘When they feel crisp, strip them from the stems and store them whole in an airtight container, away from the light.’
      • ‘Well, tobacco is stripped from the plant as large leaves.’
      • ‘It got to where I'd be stripping tobacco suckers from the plants, and I'd be able to sense a lurking copperhead.’
      • ‘Lighter mildew doesn't hurt, because leaves are stripped from the stem.’
    7. 1.7 Milk (a cow) to the last drop.
      • ‘No sign of anyone but after a few minutes a bachelor farmer would shout from the byre that he was stripping the last cow.’
  • 2Leave bare of accessories or fittings.

    ‘thieves stripped the room of luggage’
    • ‘Greek temple pediments were stripped bare and the sculpture set into the pediments of temples in Rome.’
    • ‘There were fears that the three-day meet would literally strip York bare of (still-rationed) food and drink.’
    • ‘Australian phosphate mining over the past decades has stripped the island bare.’
    • ‘The room was stripped bare but there was no doubt that it was at one time a child's room.’
    • ‘The day you announce they have been stripped bare, I'll buy you lunch.’
    • ‘A troubled theatre was forced to stay closed despite new managers taking over after it was stripped bare of its fixtures and fittings.’
    • ‘Crowds of looters waited for it to beach firmly on a sand bank so that the serious business of stripping it bare could begin.’
    • ‘The geese pull plants up by the roots to feed on them, stripping the ground bare.’
    • ‘The room was identical to their room, once inhabited, now stripped bare.’
    • ‘The original interior has been stripped back to its bare shell and the exposed structure sandblasted.’
    • ‘The house was stripped back to bare walls, rebuilt and extended during the first half of the 1990s and is now finished to a high, modern standard.’
    • ‘Inside, the rooms are stripped bare, and Anju fingers through some remaining books and papers.’
    • ‘I lugged the box to the bare, stripped living room.’
    • ‘Many shops that used to display ample stock on the sidewalk were stripped bare.’
    • ‘There is no conventional set; instead everything is stripped bare and used in unconventional ways.’
    • ‘And it took just four days for those rabbits to strip Ben's plot bare of every one of his potential prize-winners.’
    • ‘This left the US-funded base to be stripped bare by locals.’
    • ‘The cockpit has been stripped to the bare bones and restoration will begin soon.’
    • ‘In February work will begin stripping the inside of the Midland House office block.’
    empty, clear, clean out, plunder, rob, burgle, loot, rifle, pillage, ransack, gut, lay bare, devastate, sack, ravage, raid
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 Remove the accessory fittings of or take apart (a machine, motor vehicle, etc.) to inspect or adjust it.
      ‘the tank was stripped down piece by piece’
      • ‘Without using tools at all you can strip the chassis down considerably.’
      • ‘Directed to return to their units, the men responded by stripping the engines and airplanes of parts as souvenirs of the experience.’
      • ‘Within minutes the squatters had stripped the car.’
      • ‘After taking a few hours to strip the car of everything they thought might be useful, they divided it amongst themselves.’
      • ‘But the last week has seen six attacks on cars in north Ryedale, with the cars being stripped of their valuable badges each time.’
      • ‘We completely strip your machine down to the last nut and bolt then rebuild ensuring every component works perfectly.’
      • ‘At the 5,000 round mark we field stripped the rifle and inspected it.’
      • ‘To remove the smell entirely, strip the insides of the car and steam clean everything.’
      • ‘The engines for USA must be built before the Canada engines are used, let alone stripped and inspected.’
      • ‘When Paul got to the shop, he stripped the car down to the bare chassis and inspected every nut and bolt.’
      • ‘You wouldn't have a clue, would you, until you pull it apart, and really stripped it down.’
      • ‘A market trader has told how he faces going out of business after overnight raiders stripped his van of £10,000 worth of goods.’
      • ‘It was partially stripped and disassembled, basically thousands of parts in boxes and no directions!’
      • ‘After that the pistol was detail stripped and inspected again.’
      • ‘Before starting to strip the engine we drained all the oil from the engine - noting a high metal content.’
      • ‘They'd stripped the prototype engine out and were constructing a more refined version.’
      • ‘Johnny developed a life long love for fixing things and could strip a tractor down and put it together again.’
      • ‘Police who stripped the van found rope and black adjustable ties.’
      • ‘The more dilapidated eastern end of the Turbine building was partly stripped and cannibalised for other parts of the building.’
      • ‘Those used in racing events are stripped apart and studied for tolerance, performance and ride quality.’
      dismantle, disassemble, take to pieces, take to bits, take apart, break up, demolish
      View synonyms
  • 3strip someone ofDeprive someone of (rank, power, or property)

    ‘the lieutenant was stripped of his rank’
    • ‘Fine but if it does interfere I will be forced to strip you of your rank and I will take command of this ship.’
    • ‘Even then, Alucius would be stripped of most of his power.’
    • ‘Kangueehi this week announced that Botes has been stripped of all his powers as chairman of the body's Doping Committee.’
    • ‘Hitler immediately stripped Hess of all the ranks he held in the Nazi Party including being a party member.’
    • ‘Essex was executed; Southampton was imprisoned for life and stripped of his titles.’
    • ‘But then came a destructive burst that stripped the home team of the points.’
    • ‘But his request was rejected because he was stripped of Japanese citizenship when the war ended.’
    • ‘Ben Johnson originally won that race but was later stripped of his title for doping.’
    • ‘Another pro-nudism argument in poverty-stricken Brazil is that nakedness strips people of their social differences.’
    • ‘After that he was stripped of the captaincy and left out for six matches.’
    • ‘The department reinstated her, but stripped her of her rank as sergeant.’
    • ‘If he didn't attend, King Thomas could strip him of his rank, which would cripple him magically.’
    • ‘Whether the entire foursome will be stripped of their medals will have to be seen.’
    • ‘He was then stripped of his gold medal and condemned by the media and public.’
    • ‘For while it strips the president of apparent power, it also strips him of apparent culpability.’
    • ‘Initially, many old warlords resisted the wide-ranging reforms that stripped them of their powers.’
    • ‘Found guilty of treason, the Fire Master was stripped of his rank and was made an outcaste from the society of Valis.’
    • ‘As of this moment, you will be stripped of any rank the Marine Corps might've given you.’
    • ‘When they got no answers to their questions they banished out mortal forms and stripped Lord Dread of his powers.’
    take away from, dispossess, deprive, confiscate, divest, relieve, deny, rob
    View synonyms
  • 4Sell off (the assets of a company) for profit.

    • ‘Assets were being stripped out of Germany to feed the French and the British.’
    • ‘A private equity deal would have loaded the chain store with debt, slashed costs, and stripped the assets.’
    • ‘Will he fund it like Roman, or will he strip it of its assets?’
    • ‘Assets were stripped and massive sums spirited out of the country.’
    • ‘He has stressed the consortium is keen to develop the business and has no plans to strip its assets.’
    • ‘Any takeover will now be done at a premium to get costs down, with companies looking to strip particular assets.’
    • ‘Have the oligarchs stripped assets from the companies they acquired in privatization, rather than investing in them?’
    • ‘One is that the CEOs in question will be powerful enough to strip assets from their companies for their own gain - and get away with it.’
    • ‘These measures, at the very least, would not strip intellectual property owners of their right.’
    • ‘Notebook resells second-hand laptops, and any that cannot be sold are stripped for parts.’
    • ‘The company says that underlying profits were up 55 per cent, if the ASP investment is stripped out.’
    • ‘We have been stripped of substantial public assets and are further in debt than ever.’
    • ‘Corrupt managers strip their assets, while the firms' inefficiencies lead to the accumulation of nonperforming loans.’
    • ‘Until he is sentenced on May 10, it will not be known if the assets will be stripped from him by the courts.’
    • ‘We had to strip some assets from other star systems in order to deploy them near the border of Gaian territory.’
    • ‘As Browne himself admitted, once acquisitions were stripped away, underlying production fell 2% in the previous year.’
    • ‘It is ‘systematically stripping the wealth and assets of some of the country's poorest neighbourhoods’.’
    • ‘However, the newly created Civil Recovery Unit admitted it had not managed to strip assets from any of Scotland's ‘Mr Bigs’.’
    1. 4.1Finance Divest (a bond) of its interest coupons so that it and they may be sold separately.
      • ‘There is also a question of whether there is a scheme of dividend stripping.’
      • ‘Fimmda will publish the market rates for stripped zero coupon bonds on a monthly basis for valuation and tax purposes.’
      • ‘You can also buy the coupons instead of the stripped bond itself.’
      • ‘In any event, traditional dividend stripping fell out of favor as a tax strategy.’
      • ‘This unique series of funds buy Treasury bonds stripped of their interest coupons.’
  • 5Tear the thread or teeth from (a screw, gearwheel, etc.).

    • ‘I'm not sure if the threads are stripped or what.’
    • ‘After several attempts to make them fit, we stripped the threads.’
    • ‘Be extremely cautious as as you tighten the screws, so not to strip the screw holes.’
    • ‘Use quality tools and work with care so you don't strip the cleat bolts.’
    • ‘Since the receiver is aluminum it is possible to strip out the threads if you go overboard with the hex wrench.’
    • ‘The factory that built your rifle knows how to disassemble it without stripping threads or breaking pins.’
    • ‘Getting the screw out can strip the bushing threads in the frame.’
    • ‘Cowger says that being young, naive and anxious to please, when he'd stripped a bolt he would write out a repair ticket.’
    • ‘Her skating partner has stripped the threads in an axle, due to a fall, and now he has a locked wheel.’
    • ‘What if, after all those years of talking to Beth to hold onto his sanity, he'd finally stripped his gears?’
    • ‘Don't over do it, or you just end up stripping the screws.’
    • ‘I have mounted other things and it felt like you could not tighten things up without stripping the screw in the steel.’
    1. 5.1no object (of a screw, gearwheel, etc.) lose its thread or teeth.
      • ‘We were ready to remove the old squelch module when we quickly noticed that the top of the screw head was stripped.’
      • ‘Don't use the electric screwdriver to torque down the screws - it can strip out the heads.’
      • ‘Ensure the fuze well is clean and the threads are not stripped.’
      • ‘The Phillips screw had stripped, and Nettie knew she should have gone with a Robertson.’
      • ‘Because of that, your bolts are much longer, and the bolt snapped rather than the aluminum thread stripping out.’
      • ‘It was at that point that the screw thread stripped and the pressure blew the whistle up in the air.’
      • ‘The work was routine, but two stripped screws made the job more complicated and prevented the panel's removal.’
      • ‘One of the pins has come loose and the threads appear stripped, can I repair it?’
      • ‘It had an ‘H’ harness like belt hanging on a hook, stripped of gear.’
      • ‘Hold the skate over the Allen wrench and place the stripped bolt directly on top of the Allen wrench, as centred on the hole as possible.’
  • 6no object (of a bullet) be fired from a rifled gun without spin owing to a loss of surface.

noun

  • 1An act of undressing, especially in a striptease.

    ‘she got drunk and did a strip on top of the piano’
    • ‘Excuse self to find the ladies' room, indulging in a private strip for the mirror, just to see if I am sexy at all.’
    • ‘You don't seem overly concerned in the strip with keeping up a continuous narrative.’
    1. 1.1as modifier Used for or involving the performance of stripteases.
      ‘a campaigner against strip joints’
      • ‘Bourbon Street's world famous for its bars and strip joints.’
      • ‘Jason marched right up and into the strip joint, determined to get some directions.’
      • ‘Caesars is reputed to be the hottest strip joint in Kingston.’
      • ‘By dives, you mean bars, strip joints, greasy spoon places?’
      • ‘The story, as most people must know, concerns the efforts of six men to raise money for their wives and families by performing a strip act.’
      • ‘It became a club hit in the US, and is apparently still a staple in strip joints.’
      • ‘Clubs and strip joints were open for business, and dark pubs were filled to the brim with chilled customers.’
      • ‘My stripping ‘career’ didn't begin in a sleazy strip joint, conveniently located on the side of some local highway.’
      • ‘One spot that should not be missed downtown is Fremont Street, where a large number of casinos and strip bars are located.’
      • ‘He gets a tip from Mike that the Whale went to a strip joint.’
      • ‘A couple of weeks ago the Don Hotel, the last of the city's legendary strip joints, closed its doors.’
      • ‘The Europa was a strip joint, drug den and haven for hookers, particularly under-age girls.’
      • ‘Bars and strip joints were the only buildings on the side of the long street.’
      • ‘First, most of the sailors can't afford Manhattan's strip joints.’
      • ‘I was working in this strip joint in Louisville about two years ago.’
      • ‘She not only bares herself for your scrutiny on her blog, she bares all at a couple of strip joints.’
      • ‘What kind of person goes into a strip joint at midday on the weekend?’
      • ‘So are strikes carried out by illegal-immigrant operatives with a fondness for strip joints living in the United States.’
      • ‘Are you sure that the previous Egyptian mission surveillance photos weren't mixed with those from a 21st century strip joint?’
      • ‘Disability does nothing to dampen his interest in smoking, drinking, skiving school and visiting strip joints.’
  • 2British The identifying outfit worn by the members of a sports team while playing.

    ‘the team's away strip is a garish mix of red, white, and blue’
    • ‘‘Our black strip has been a favourite with the team this season and it would be great if the public got behind them in this way,’ he said.’
    • ‘‘It looks like we might have to play in the away strip,’ said club chairman, Mr Neil Spencer.’
    • ‘Are teams whose home strip is red more likely to win/stay up than teams in other colours?’
    • ‘The home side wore green jerseys instead of orange, and the unfamiliar strips reflected the performance they produced.’
    • ‘Unlike the vast majority of junior teams, our strips have squad numbers and names on the back.’
    • ‘Ryan, a keen Manchester City fan, was buried in a team strip sent to his Holborn Street, Brimrod, home by the Premier League club.’
    • ‘Shamutete also requested the firm to send new strips of track suits and jerseys to the national soccer team.’
    • ‘He promises that when Sunderland win the Premiership, he will add a framed strip of his favourite team.’
    • ‘Spain are playing in a white strip with red trim tonight, while the hosts Portugal line out in their usual attire of red shirts and green shorts.’
    • ‘If the jogger was wearing the strip of the team they favoured, they stopped and helped.’
    • ‘And so the only colours that mattered to those taking their seats at Elland Road yesterday were white and red, the teams' strips.’
    • ‘Wigan are set to play in their black strip and the Bulls, as top qualifiers, have been allocated the home dressing room.’
    • ‘In the United States, a team strip is actually called a uniform.’
    • ‘This time he donated a strip to the school team in the town of Serekunda.’
    • ‘In a recent soccer tournament they were runners-up, but were the only team without a proper strip.’
    • ‘This survey has subsequently been extended to several more strips by the same team.’
    • ‘After their final the team was presented with boots, a football strip for the school, and their medals, by sponsor Adidas Predator.’
    • ‘He also said companies in the textile industry could provide kit for the team in return for having their corporate logo on the strip.’
    • ‘Deportivo are in their home strip of blue and white stripes, blue shorts and socks.’
    • ‘This is reflected in their team strip - which is, um, pretty striking.’
    outfit, clothes, clothing, garments, costume, suit, dress, garb
    View synonyms

Origin

Middle English (as a verb): of Germanic origin; related to Dutch stropen. strip (sense 2 of the noun) arose in the late 20th century, possibly from the notion of clothing to which a player ‘strips’ down.

Pronunciation

strip

/strɪp/

Main definitions of strip in English

: strip1strip2

strip2

noun

  • 1A long, narrow piece of cloth, paper, plastic, or some other material.

    ‘a strip of linen’
    • ‘Tape a strip of paper or fabric ribbon around the jar.’
    • ‘I eat cheese every day, so my favorite lunch is a thin-crust pizza topped with chicken strips.’
    • ‘Then add several strips of cucumber next to the crab and on top of the avocado.’
    • ‘So, starting today, there's a new strip running across the top of the front page of this site for a phoneblog.’
    • ‘Place green salad on individual plates and top with chicken strips.’
    • ‘Carefully, she cut several holly leaves out of a strip of green paper and three berries out a piece of vivid crimson.’
    • ‘Then I placed two strips of 1/4-inch foam core between the top mat and the gold matboard.’
    • ‘Initial tests of the strips have been successful when Devro's products have been compared with other brands.’
    • ‘As they neared the hatch to the main section of the ship, he began to tear off strips and apply it over the cracks in the captain's helmet.’
    • ‘She had on a pair of pale pink track pants, with grey running down the legs in two thin strips, a black top, and a blue jacket.’
    • ‘Served on a bed of rice, this consisted of soft strips of veal topped with hot prunes, all liberally sprinkled with sesame seeds.’
    • ‘They are good in sandwiches or cut into strips on top of a salad.’
    • ‘The magnetic strip is read and used to produce a new card or buy goods online.’
    • ‘She flounced a few inches away, then began tearing strips off the sheet.’
    • ‘Even without these boundaries, there are good visual and organizational reasons to put strips of commands at the top of the screen.’
    • ‘Place into bowls, and top with tortilla strips, cheese and chives.’
    • ‘Pressing them on top of the cut, he secured them with the strips.’
    • ‘Cut across the strips to produce a pile of very thin slices.’
    • ‘The top strip was blue so that the sky looked right, and the bottom stripe was green for any shots of grass.’
    • ‘The top and the decorative strip are characteristic of Chinese bells and commonly found on Choson bells.’
    narrow piece, piece, bit, band, belt, ribbon, sash, stripe, bar, swathe, slip, fillet, shred
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A long, narrow area of land.
      ‘the offensive gained a strip of territory a mile wide’
      • ‘This erosion hazard area is the strip of land that should disappear within the next 30 years, given the historical erosion rate.’
      • ‘An area of 2,000 square metres is equivalent to a strip of land just 100 metres long and 20 metres wide.’
      • ‘The bitumen-surfaced path has been created by buying a strip of land along the edge of the field next to the road.’
      • ‘We've taken 30 acres out of production already for double-wide waterways and filter strips.’
      • ‘The Lido in Venice is a strip of land dividing the lagoon from the Adriatic, just a short vaporetto ride from St Mark's.’
      • ‘Between each plot, there's a strip of no-man's land disguised as a hedge or a ditch.’
      • ‘The other nine soldiers who had had nothing else to do had spent all day clearing out a strip of land for a runway.’
      • ‘In this case, the area was a strip of beach about a hundred yards long.’
      • ‘I began to slowly swim around, trying to find a strip of land on the horizon, but all that was visible was pure ocean blue.’
      • ‘Cabinet Magazine would like you to buy a strip of land in New Mexico.’
      • ‘The most productive row crop fields occupy the narrow strip of flat land by the river.’
      • ‘The island was narrow, a strip of land about twenty miles long, running in a north-south direction.’
      • ‘Grass buffers are narrow strips of land between the crop and stream.’
      • ‘Compared to a strip of land in Hungary, it's a cinch.’
      • ‘In the villages most people own a strip of land and grow their own food.’
      • ‘A riparian zone is a strip of land extending on average 10-30m from a designated river.’
      • ‘This had been a lake with a strip of land connecting the Welsh and Wexford coasts in the south.’
      • ‘In this sense, peasants were simply tenants who worked a strip of land or maybe several strips.’
      • ‘Card can also be used for borders, with separate strips to define planting areas.’
      • ‘On Tuesday just six caravans were occupying a strip of land destined to house a £500,000 youth club and multi-use hall.’
    2. 1.2North American A main road in or leading out of a town that is lined with shops, restaurants, and other facilities.
      ‘we went to a discount centre in a strip near where we work’
      • ‘But not all of Vegas' attractions are nestled on the main strip.’
      • ‘On weekend nights dancing, laughing and music can be heard spilling from the bars, clubs and restaurants that line the strip.’
      • ‘Instead of shooting each other, they ran around lining up cars on the main strip.’
      • ‘And since one of the slopes that slipped faced Miami's main business strip, everyone in town knew that the cows had saved the day.’
      • ‘This is really the main strip in Biloxi, at least where the hotels and the casinos are.’
      • ‘His dream is to make all the foreshores a continuous strip of over priced cafes topped with similarly overpriced apartments.’
      • ‘The nightclub was one of the newest on the main strip of Sunset City and bore the city's name.’
      • ‘Heaving my own sigh of defeat, I led her out of the strip of town.’
      • ‘Wesley high school stood in the middle of town just off the main strip of Wesley road.’
      • ‘As soon as we finished setting up our tent, we hightailed it to the main strip.’
      • ‘The main pastime in town was cruising the strip, so we headed over there in the afternoon to see what we could find.’
      • ‘At Studio Bliss, a recently opened spa on the St-Laurent strip, you can double your pleasure with a four-hand massage or soak up a rain massage.’
      • ‘Galleries line Ocean Avenue, the town's main strip, but area museums are also a good bet.’
      • ‘So next week The News will be coming from the Flamingo Casino on the strip in down town Las Vegas.’
      • ‘There is an emergency command center in a hotel here right on the strip.’
      • ‘We stopped and ate in a historically-rich diner joint in the main strip.’
      • ‘Nelson agreed and they said goodbye as the Ryan women walked out into the main strip of town.’
      • ‘As they began to walk down the main strip Janine spoke up.’
      • ‘Sarah's favorite eatery was located not too far from Centreville's main strip - Acadia Road.’
      • ‘I had a big smile on my face and was practically skipping back towards the main strip.’
    3. 1.3mass noun Steel or other metal in the form of narrow flat bars.
      ‘the company had purchased 67,423 kg of steel strip’
      • ‘It is just a long metal strip with a little keypad and monitor on it that will fuse itself to your glove.’
      • ‘The tail has a raised appearance with large light clusters and that single metal strip gives it a very distinctive look.’
      • ‘A fully electronic unit, it consists of a wide, flat strip that extends into the tank, topped by a cap housing the electronics.’
      • ‘She had it re-framed in a wide black frame with a narrow gilded strip at the sight edge.’
      • ‘I grabbed onto the long strip of metal slipped through the handles of the door.’
      • ‘Attached to the box was a long, metal strip that extended about twenty feet.’
      • ‘Most noticeable were the metallic spheres, the red strip of indented metal in the center shining ominously when the light hit.’
      • ‘‘Not bad for your first time, Davis,’ Johnson says as I cross the metal strip that marks the end of the course.’
      • ‘The driver nodded once and pressed a narrow strip of metal to the floor.’
      • ‘If she had felt the thick strip of metal down my side, she certainly would have been curious.’
      • ‘The caster roll is used in the manufacture of metal plate, strip, sheet, or foil.’
      • ‘Her hand trembled with the effort of keeping the metal sensor strip in place.’
      • ‘He hooked the leather-lined, broad strip of bronze around his corded-muscle mid-section.’
      • ‘This contains a thin, flat strip made of a layer of iron and a layer of brass soldered together, and bent into a coil.’
      • ‘The strip of metal was light enough on his shoulder and he could, for a while longer, ignore the steady drip of water down his neck.’
      • ‘The hold I had on my brother's hand got even tighter as the doctor began to gradually urge the thin strip of metal out of my body.’
      • ‘Sgt Smith said he later discovered the weapon was not a sword, but a metal carpet strip or carpet gripper.’
      • ‘The island's butcher-block top is divided into two sections by an undulating strip of stainless steel.’
      • ‘Wrought zinc and zinc alloys may be obtained as rolled strip, sheet and foil; extruded rod and shapes; and drawn rod and wire.’
      • ‘You press a remote control button on your pole handle and - voila - a thin metal strip extends from the sides of your skis.’
  • 2A comic strip.

    as modifier ‘a strip cartoon’
    • ‘Three times during the weekend, other cartoonists had to physically restrain him from creating a new strip.’
    • ‘I sketched out a strip and this got me into the school.’
    • ‘It consists of a series of pictures carved from alabaster, which read from left to right like a strip cartoon.’
    • ‘Perhaps the paper might toy with the idea of further endorsing the country's cartoon talent with a full page of strips?’
    • ‘In lieu of that, there's always this reissue of the original strip in book form.’
    • ‘In lieu of an entry today, I give you this: the first strip in my new comic series, ‘Scutmonkey’.’
    • ‘Steve also brings us our weekly strip cartoon Back Yard, which you can read on Page 20.’
    • ‘There's more to it than Marc Bell, whose playfully obtuse strips and illustrations get most of the attention.’
    • ‘As revealed in the Evening Press, the change of image for the Minstermen includes plans for a new strip for next season.’
    • ‘Born in 1929, Han worked as a strip cartoon artist for the Shanghai Art Publishing House for decades.’
    • ‘Evidence from local people suggest the name came from a strip cartoon in the comic Dandy entitled Danny and his Grockle.’
    • ‘The first strip was published in 1992 in the Weekly Mail, which has since become the Mail and Guardian.’
    • ‘The Times took a few strips from the Mirror (Pogo was one) but cast the others adrift.’
    • ‘Lee, as you requested, here are some rough outlines of my next few strips.’
    • ‘His obsessive past-time of penning cartoons eventually paid off in 1977, when his strip, Life In Hell, debuted.’
    • ‘Also, in the final strip, there's a fine caricature of a Wily's Overland, rather than the standard Jeep, which would have been easier to draw.’
    • ‘But there are some strips from the original comics that influenced him.’
    • ‘Tokaii's satire strips were the hit item of the erstwhile weekly magazine ‘Bichitra’.’
    • ‘The book was an analysis of the capitalist ethic in Disney comics, illustrated with hundreds of strips.’
    • ‘The comic was originally designed so that it could be a Sunday strip in the newspapers, but that was not to be.’
  • 3British A programme broadcast regularly at the same time.

    ‘he hosts a weekly two-hour advice strip’
    • ‘So in addition to my weekly strip, which was about politics but also social and pop-culture issues, I began doing all sorts of things.’
    • ‘At the end of the strip, the reader is left fully outside the frame, but inside the narrative.’
    • ‘If I had a regular strip going now that reflected daily life, then that would be a document of the era we're living in.’
    • ‘The strip also outlines steps local people can take.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from or related to Middle Low German strippe ‘strap, thong’, probably also to stripe.

Pronunciation

strip

/strɪp/