Definition of string theory in English:

string theory

noun

  • [mass noun] A cosmological theory based on the existence of cosmic strings.

    See string
    • ‘This is very impressive, especially since they had no quantum mechanics and no string theory!’
    • ‘There are two classes of results relevant for quantum black holes in string theory.’
    • ‘Can string theory make any cosmological predictions relevant to Big Bang physics?’
    • ‘If string theory is a theory of gravity, then how does it compare with Einstein's theory of gravity?’
    • ‘Of course many, many theorists were involved in the development of string theory which continues to this date.’
    • ‘Some promising ideas, such as inflationary cosmology and string theory, already exist.’
    • ‘Does string theory incorporate number theory in its structure?’
    • ‘Brian moved to some extent from hardcore string theory into thinking about cosmology.’
    • ‘Perhaps, lies even exist in non-living events like the existence of stars or string theory.’
    • ‘It has been used in gauge theory, instantons, monopoles, string theory and the theory of anomalies.’
    • ‘Is string theory really the long-sought Theory of Everything?’
    • ‘When supersymmetry is not broken, it's easy to get a zero cosmological constant in string theory.’
    • ‘One exciting candidate for a new unifying theory is string theory.’
    • ‘The second was the adaptation of the multidimensional string theory to show how thought is mere computation.’
    • ‘For the two years that followed, string theory was the theory of hadrons.’
    • ‘Time will tell whether string theory can be the connection.’
    • ‘Indeed, this feature would appear to be present even if string theory proves not to be the correct theory of quantum gravity.’
    • ‘In string theory, the strings collide over a small but finite distance, and the answers do make sense.’
    • ‘In 1974 the question finally was asked: could string theory be a theory of quantum gravity?’
    • ‘Now how does string theory connect this to a microscopic density of quantum states?’