Definition of stride in English:



  • 1[no object, with adverbial of direction] Walk with long, decisive steps in a specified direction.

    ‘he strode across the road’
    figurative ‘we are striding confidently towards the future’
    • ‘She strode off in the direction of the scream and, abashed but still reluctantly, I chased after her.’
    • ‘He ended the conversation abruptly and strode with quick steps back to the helm, which he had secured temporarily on a line.’
    • ‘He gave me a sad smile, dug the heel of his combat boot into the rubbery ground and spun in the opposite direction, striding down the hallway.’
    • ‘I strode confidently towards it, until I realised that my steep drive now resembled an ice rink.’
    • ‘As quicker walkers stride ahead, the direction of travel is changed putting the faster walkers at the back.’
    • ‘Thomas let out an angry huff, and strode in the direction of the stables.’
    • ‘Nodding the redhead turned sharply on his heel and started striding off in the direction indicated by the brunette.’
    • ‘David went deep within himself, met God, and found strength and direction to stride into the way of salvation.’
    • ‘Once again Brecht's eyes surveyed the grounds before they settled on a broad shouldered brute of a man who was already striding confidently toward him.’
    • ‘It might have been because I was gazing wistfully at him as he strode in our direction.’
    • ‘Kaerie left her room and strode down the steps of the stairs in search of Mrs. Norton.’
    • ‘She strode swiftly and confidently towards Chris, hands shoved into the pockets of her jeans.’
    • ‘The thin man slipped between them and fluttered down the steps, striding to the far end of the room.’
    • ‘Fifteen minutes later the door opened to reveal the Marquess of Bradford, striding confidently towards him.’
    • ‘Crouching for breath might be a more appropriate position to assume after striding to the top step.’
    • ‘Will just gave me a look of such utter wrath and betrayal that I took an involuntary step backwards as he strode towards me.’
    • ‘He split away from the group and began striding in our direction, shouting questions.’
    • ‘I turned to find Mrs. Abernathy striding down the steps toward us, looking and sounding harassed and more than a little stressed.’
    • ‘Their festering sexuality squinted at you through their unwashed fringes as they strode in step down the school corridors.’
    • ‘Bross, in the meantime, strode confidently, taking even steps, a ghost of a smile on his face.’
    march, stalk, pace, tread, step, walk
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[with object]Walk about or along (a street or other place) with long, decisive steps.
      ‘a woman striding the cobbled streets’
      • ‘The number of foreign trips being made by the First Minister is a reflection of his desire to stride the foreign stage.’
      • ‘Pele and Diego Maradona are the two best footballers ever to stride the planet.’
      • ‘As problems at home well up, she diverts attention by striding the world stage.’
      • ‘The stranger strode the hallways, scanning the placards outside each door.’
      • ‘In bright sunshine yesterday, the relaxed minister strode the fairways with thoughts of politics far from his mind.’
      • ‘Especially when one of them is the richest, and potentially the greatest, who ever strode a golf course.’
      • ‘You might have seen this tall man, hair swept back, with a thick black moustache striding the stage in plays.’
      • ‘Perhaps even now he is striding the Highlands, walking stick in hand.’
      • ‘He strides both the Harlem and Brooklyn black power bases and is the single most popular politician among both blacks and Hispanics in the streets.’
      • ‘Throughout all Strauss continued to display magnificent form, and Flintoff strode the various arenas like a colossus.’
      • ‘Giants of the 1980s, striding the political stage, became the clapped-out bores of the 1990s.’
      • ‘Darren Kelly's leveller just ten minutes from time means City are creeping rather than striding their way to glory.’
      • ‘One after another, they strode the dais and cracked their favourite jokes and recited couplets.’
      • ‘Down the main street of Cowdenbeath strides Major Bob Ritchie of the Black Watch, an icy wind pulling at the red hackle on his bonnet.’
  • 2[no object] Cross (an obstacle) with one long step.

    • ‘It was Chris, striding across the lawns towards the canteen, something in his step suggesting a conquering general returning home in triumph.’
    • ‘He strides across the grounds of the Gleneagles Hotel, resplendent in mustard yellow cords, flat cap and wax jacket, his pruned moustache often twisting up in a smile.’
    • ‘This week, however, Severin strode across an even more telling dividing line.’
    • ‘We've seen the training videos, where the long, lean figure in flowing robes strides across a desert landscape, a Kalashnikov under arm.’
    • ‘A man in a flight suit strides over to the closest patient, the black Christian cross badge on his tan uniform indicating his role among the aircrew.’
    • ‘So, party aides are now striding over the political terrain with a divining rod, trying to find the clear blue water which once separated the two parties back in the days when the party was at its peak popularity.’
    • ‘In the 15 minutes I've been standing here one group of Americans have taken about forty photos, and another proud mum has camcordered her four girls striding across the crossing.’
    • ‘For most of them, the attraction lies not just in the shooting itself, but in the day spent striding over the hills, watching their dogs at work and enjoying the camaraderie that is part and parcel of shooting.’
    • ‘Retired school head, Bill Spray, said the doctor had spent his entire life apart from his five year medical training in Marlborough and ‘was never happier than when striding over the downs’.’
    • ‘Quoting from HG Wells' science fiction classic The War of the Worlds, the MP said high-tech windfarms were ‘monstrous tripods, striding over young pine trees, and smashing them aside’.’
    • ‘I have an image of living in a country cottage by a babbling brook, striding over the hills with my two black Labradors for a pint in the village inn.’
    • ‘So relieved was I to have averted disaster on the tee that, before I had time to see sense, my feet were striding across the sand, and enabling a 7-iron to flick the ball clean off the surface and onto a position just ahead of the green.’
    1. 2.1literary [with object]Bestride.
      ‘new wealth enabled Britain to stride the world once more’
      • ‘It now strides the globe as a banking colossus; albeit one with three legs.’
      • ‘In their time, these two men strode the world stage and influenced innumerable young lives.’
      • ‘The titans of the computer industry stride the media heavens.’
      • ‘Fifty years later, he strode the scene with his heady compositions.’
      • ‘Sure, as a nation we don't stride the world like giants any more.’
      • ‘At nearly 200 feet, the building is a colossus which strides the entire block between West Nile Street and Renfield Street.’


  • 1A long, decisive step.

    ‘he crossed the room in a couple of strides’
    • ‘‘Belle,’ he said as he stood up and took three long strides towards her.’
    • ‘He said nothing, and turned back to continue his stride down the sidewalk.’
    • ‘There were clowns on stilts, eerily taking giant strides around the square.’
    • ‘His leather packages were draped over the animal's body and they were knocked up and down as the horse took enormous strides towards Jourogn.’
    • ‘Talking slow strides towards him, Jane smiled and placed her hands around his neck.’
    • ‘I turn to see Abraham walking towards me in long strides.’
    • ‘He stepped out and took long strides towards the elevator.’
    • ‘Watching his long strides towards the door, Danielle lets herself smile with maternal affection.’
    • ‘Taking long strides towards him, Brett was pleasantly surprised to find that he was taller than the model.’
    • ‘Ben crossed the room in two short strides and scooped her onto his knee.’
    • ‘He ran to me, his shoes clamoring on the floor ungracefully, as if these few strides towards me would forever determine the rest of his life.’
    • ‘Consider him: at slow or fast-medium, his approach never varied; two short walking paces, six running strides and a four-foot leap.’
    • ‘I grinned and crossed to the bed in three strides, kissing Black passionately.’
    • ‘In the final few strides the Glaswegian eased past both Richards and Catherine Murthy, the Welshwoman who had previously held the fastest time by a Briton this year.’
    • ‘Taking long strides towards him was the headmaster, Mr. Bates.’
    • ‘Then with a couple of strides of that long gait of his, he had made room in behind McKenna and had only one thing in mind.’
    • ‘In two bounding strides the woman was in the street, kneeling over her friend.’
    • ‘I took slow strides towards the table, looking around, trying to keep my head high, and not freak out.’
    • ‘He took long, quick strides; his pace as familiar to me as my own.’
    • ‘I began taking long strides towards the entrance, leaving Josh behind.’
    step, long step, large step, pace, footstep
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[in singular]The length of a step or manner of taking steps in walking or running.
      ‘the horse shortened its stride’
      ‘he followed her with an easy stride’
      • ‘With a purposeful stride Eddy walked through the people with an encouraging smile upon her half hidden face.’
      • ‘Stand with your feet together and step forward with your right, about a long stride's length in front of your left.’
      • ‘In fact I read it in his obituary but it didn't stick because for forty years the lanky man with the loping stride who walked all over town was simply known as Boy.’
      • ‘He walked with a determined stride, as if he knew where he was going and nothing would stop him from getting there.’
      • ‘When she walked, she walked in a stride, sometimes slow, sometimes fast.’
      • ‘He did not run, but he walked with a distance-eating stride.’
      • ‘This is an efficient way of moving, and also allows an increase in the length of the stride, as well as avoiding the compression of the lungs.’
      • ‘She walks with the determined stride of a woman who leads from the front.’
      • ‘I brought the book downstairs with me, walking at a brisk stride.’
      • ‘One stride out, the horse to the outside angled in giving us a sharp bump.’
      • ‘When we reached the village on foot the others went ahead, walking in a purposeful stride toward the synagogue.’
      • ‘Liao walked into a quick stride and Kazuya walked steadily behind her.’
      • ‘He then took to walking in a stride towards these fellows, smelling the aroma emanating from the beverage.’
      • ‘So I showed them how I walked with the bent-kneed stride of the cattle herder, how I leaned on my staff while talking with my gaze far away as if in search of a straying cow.’
      • ‘She just took a medium stride and walked back to her home.’
      • ‘I carefully flipped my long blond locks out of my face and adopted a confident stride as I walked out of the alley towards the apartment complex.’
      • ‘The decrease is in stride length rather than steps per minute.’
      • ‘With her hair tied back in a bun and a sharp business skirt on, she walked with a stride of confidence.’
      • ‘Where your heel lands is your proper stride length when walking for fitness.’
      • ‘After a while her posture lent itself a graceful, long-legged lope when she ran, or a silent stride when she was walking.’
  • 2A step or stage in progress towards an aim.

    ‘great strides have been made towards equality’
    • ‘The town has made great strides over the past number of months and the club is delighted with the progress of the team.’
    • ‘It reflects the great strides the school has made under the new head teacher.’
    • ‘Southampton has made great strides over the past six years in closing the gap between our results and the national averages, and we are proud of this achievement.’
    • ‘Zambia has so far made some positive strides in this direction although the challenges still remain in some aspects like packaging.’
    • ‘There can be no question however that the Spanish League has made tremendous strides over the past few seasons and that Spanish soccer is once again on the rise.’
    • ‘However, an exciting alternative method of acceleration is making great strides towards the next energy regime.’
    • ‘He notes that while geo-thermal and solar energy are still in their infancy, wind power has made significant strides over the past decade, especially in Europe.’
    • ‘Ultimately, I believe both nations must make strides towards the middle.’
    • ‘It's not a hard-and-fast rule, because every so often an athlete or team will make great strides towards success with a big heart and a small wallet.’
    • ‘We're looking forward to making massive strides this season, and hopefully there are people out there who could a role in the club, at some level.’
    • ‘Yet, the Union has made far fewer and shorter strides towards integrating societal interests compared to the steps it has taken to subject new policies to collective governance.’
    • ‘As early as the 1930s Veblen expressed pride in the enormous strides the country had taken up to that time.’
    • ‘Without leaving his wheelchair, he was able to make great strides towards a cure for conditions like his.’
    • ‘But Professor Brenner said research into blood coagulation had made significant strides over the past two decades.’
    • ‘But an ever-expanding organisation has been making vast strides towards solving these problems.’
    • ‘I hope people can see the club has made some great strides over recent times.’
    • ‘Within the next five years, with energetic political representation, nationalists will make major strides towards real equality in this state.’
    • ‘Even as the country takes great strides towards progress and the living standards of the urban elite improve, the society slips backwards.’
    • ‘But by French standards, it has made impressive strides towards more acceptable international norms.’
    • ‘It has made admirable strides in recent years towards more democratic access, and it is not in our interest to see them take a step backwards.’
    make progress, make headway, gain ground, progress, advance, proceed, move, get on, get ahead, come on, come along, shape up, take shape, move forward in leaps and bounds
    be getting there
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    1. 2.1A good or regular rate of progress, especially after a slow or hesitant start.
      ‘the speaker was getting into his stride’
      • ‘You know, I think we all like to think that we haven't hit our stride yet.’
      • ‘Indeed, in recent days both frontrunners seem to have hit their stride, for the time being at least, and are campaigning smoothly.’
      • ‘The play gains momentum in its second act, in which both leads and two fine male supports, finally hit their stride.’
      • ‘The early books are interesting in an evolutionary sense, as they show how Rankin got started and hit his stride.’
      • ‘I don't think we've hit our stride in terms of working together.’
      • ‘Edwards really seemed to have hit his stride and was right on the mark, whether talking about his background, or addressing issues of concern.’
      • ‘But then maybe about seven or eight minutes in he started to hit his stride.’
      • ‘It's a great show; he's really hit his stride, and most of the pieces are already sold.’
      • ‘Morris hit his stride several years later as a member of the Pennsylvania delegation to the Constitutional Convention.’
      • ‘It was during these years that Da Vinci hit his stride, reaching new heights of scientific and artistic achievement.’
  • 3British informal Trousers.

    • ‘He is often admired for his tasteful shirts, cool strides and groovy haircuts.’
    • ‘I've always wanted to wear spandex strides.’
    • ‘The manic shoppers in search of baby-soft cashmere or cool leather strides range from gamine model types to balding businessmen and sleek middle-aged ladies.’
    • ‘Otherwise he is all red and black - red shirt, black strides, black jacket with rhinestone trim, and an astonishing pair of lace-ups in red crocodile skin.’
  • 4[as modifier] Denoting or relating to a rhythmic style of jazz piano playing in which the left hand alternately plays single bass notes on the downbeat and chords an octave higher on the upbeat.

    ‘he's a noted stride pianist’
    • ‘James P. Johnson was the prime innovator of stride piano. He embellished basic ragtime syncopation, beginning with a general increase in tempo.’
    • ‘Here was stride piano playing of the magnificent variety!’
    • ‘Moran intersperses breathtaking flights of improvisation with vamps, ostinatos, and stride techniques.’
    • ‘If you love stride, blues and jazz piano but haven't found a definitive collection, look no further.’


  • break (one's) stride

    • Slow or interrupt the pace at which one walks or moves.

      ‘Davis scored from 20 yards without breaking stride’
      • ‘Barely breaking his stride, Craig Brewster brushes past in the Caledonian stadium tunnel, a surge of purpose.’
      • ‘Rupert barely glanced over his shoulder, never breaking his stride as he continued to stroll down the hall.’
      • ‘The smuggler walked right past them through the gate and never broke his stride.’
      • ‘‘Now no one will see,’ he announced, not once breaking his stride.’
      • ‘He quickly demolished most of the pie, then chucked the remains and the paper bag it had been in on the pavement, without breaking his stride.’
      • ‘I caught his glance, but they passed without breaking their stride.’
      • ‘If I broke my stride, I wasn't sure I'd get it back.’
      • ‘I watched his car disappear into the distance, but never broke my stride. ‘Let him go’ I told myself, I meant it in more ways then one.’
      • ‘The important thing is not to break one's stride: to drivers and motorcyclists, you are simply another vehicle, moving steadily in a given direction.’
      • ‘The City skipper didn't even have to break his stride as he took the ball into the box and passed it with purpose into the corner of the net.’
  • match someone stride for stride

    • Manage to keep up with a competitor.

      ‘bargain basement Newry matched their high price rivals stride for stride’
      • ‘Fortunately for the home side, Myers matched him stride for stride and ushered the ball out of harm's way.’
      • ‘Playing with the breeze, Glenmanor matched Drumlea stride for stride in the first-half, after which the sides were on level terms.’
      • ‘I asked him as I scurried along beside him, trying to match him stride for stride. ‘I didn't notice you leave.’’
      • ‘However, it might not be too long before City are not just clinging to the coattails of their Premiership neighbours but matching them stride for stride - if only in the fitness stakes.’
      • ‘For an hour his team matched Chelsea stride for stride, creating better chances, constructing more flowing moves.’
      • ‘A week ago, I was unable to walk… now I matched him stride for stride going through a two mile run.’
      • ‘He matches you stride for stride, and he is running very well right now.’
      • ‘Egewe slowed his own pace, matching Zylnain stride for stride.’
      • ‘She was pleased to see that she had matched Nika stride for stride while she let her thoughts run on.’
      • ‘Having little experience in the whole dance department, I had to watch Matik's footing closely, matching him stride for stride.’
  • take something in one's stride (us also take something in stride)

    • Deal with something difficult or unpleasant in a calm and accepting way.

      ‘I told her what had happened and she took it all in her stride’
      • ‘A person of unassuming nature, she took things in her stride and was independent by nature.’
      • ‘I just take it in my stride, but it's kind of hurtful to the families that are involved.’
      • ‘When the time came for Ruby to step into the spotlight, she took things in her stride.’
      • ‘I have to take it in my stride and take a few deep breaths and manage it in the most mature way I can.’
      • ‘So, although the outcome of this war is not in doubt, we may have to take some unpleasant surprises in our stride.’
      • ‘I know never to expect anything from the criminal justice system, so you are trying to be calm and take it in your stride.’
      • ‘He was a man who thrived on challenge, who took obstacles in his stride; he was proud of it.’
      • ‘Fortunately she did not find the IVF regime too unpleasant and took the process in her stride.’
      • ‘It was as if whatever happens I will take it in my stride and will accept my challenges as they come.’
      • ‘He adapted well to these changes and took things in his stride.’
      deal with easily, cope with easily, think nothing of, accept as quite normal, accept as quite usual, not bat an eyelid
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Old English stride (noun) ‘single long step’, strīdan (verb) ‘stand or walk with the legs wide apart’, probably from a Germanic base meaning strive, quarrel; related to Dutch strijden fight and German streiten quarrel.