Definition of street door in English:

street door

noun

  • The main door of a house opening on to the street.

    • ‘A downstairs neighbour let them in through the street door.’
    • ‘Most of the street doors were wide open, and through them I stepped straight into the front parlour.’
    • ‘It's a fabulously grand home - even though you approach the street door down a narrow alleyway hung with washing - but they're not grand about it.’
    • ‘As soon as the street door opened every news camera in the southern hemisphere hit the lights and reporters started yelling questions.’
    • ‘Bryan alleged that as he and Rebecca approached, Mawhood and Mr Gilchrist were kissing and cuddling at their street door, but Rebecca claimed the couple were having a short argument.’
    • ‘I heard his little steps hammer up the stairs, but Marissa must have picked him up, for there came a great howling under the door, and it was abruptly cut off by the street door crashing shut.’
    • ‘When we go out, we transit the same doors but use fewer keys-the elevator and the street door lock behind us.’
    • ‘Nowadays, especially in cafes with large street doors, they are just as comfortable as you are - perhaps more so: no waiter is going to present them with a bill.’
    • ‘As he was in the lead, Astor pulled the street door open for Maddox.’
    • ‘Follow me in five minutes; and don't knock at the street door.’
    • ‘Viola ducks away from him and blunders blindly out of the street door, in tears.’
    • ‘I got off to a bad start when I couldn't figure out how to open the street door to the restaurant.’
    • ‘My job at the food importers started at seven, and the street door of the overflow hostel was not unlocked until seven.’
    • ‘He gets out of the street door and walks around to the sidewalk door, opens it and pulls his female companion out by her hair and dumps her to the ground.’
    • ‘Soon a fan the size of a card table is pulling the bad air out the street door.’
    • ‘When they unlock the street door, they take the puppy off its leash.’