Definition of strangulate in English:



  • 1Medicine
    Prevent circulation of the blood supply through (a part of the body, especially a hernia) by constriction.

    ‘a strangulated hernia’
    • ‘Pain is not common but can occur when the pile is strangulated or clotted.’
    • ‘Acutely strangulated haemorrhoids occur as a result of thrombus formation resulting in gross swelling, irreducible prolapse, and severe pain.’
    • ‘His best feathered friend is an adopted Canada goose named Gilligan that he saved from strangulating in a fishing net, an ongoing love affair that will soon become a children's book.’
    • ‘These can get caught on objects and strangulate the child.’
    • ‘Amniotic bands that connected a hypocoiled cord to the fetal neck and strangulated the neck were seen in one case.’
    • ‘He subsequently underwent surgery to remove six feet of small intestine, which had strangulated itself because a benign tumor of fat cells that restricted blood flow.’
    • ‘He said the defendant decided to do away with her cousin when she could not repay the loan, and had her strangulated, by two close aides.’
    • ‘If a child was doing it, it could encircle and strangulate part of the body and that would interfere with the blood supply.’
  • 2informal Strangle; throttle.

    ‘the poor woman died strangulated’
    • ‘All of a sudden - when the working classes benefit - we get a massed chorus warning of money's strangulating effect.’
    • ‘The minorities, especially the ten million Christians, are physically, socially and spiritually strangulated and trapped under the Blasphemy Law in Pakistan.’
    • ‘This absorbs the human resources of the police and reduces their ability to strangulate the supply route.’
    • ‘He came up with the scheme in response to strangulating trading blocks imposed by England, which had led to widespread poverty in Scotland.’
    • ‘Mr Surjewala said the government had strangulated the democracy in Haryana by registering false criminal cases against Congress leaders and workers.’
    • ‘He has beaten up his mother and children and even tried to strangulate one child.’
    • ‘The Government has decided to legislate, regulate and, as usual, strangulate.’
    • ‘But the law is free of that strangulating formalism that is seen as a burden rather than a blessing.’
    • ‘Indian fashion is at a different stage of development and just arbitrarily dumping foreign trends into clothes stores strangulates Indian tastes and style.’
    • ‘As the project is executed with aid from the World Bank, there may be several strings attached that may eventually strangulate the unsuspecting customers whose immediate need is water.’
    • ‘As a consequence, the city is reduced to humdrum of brick and mortar breeding environmental and health hazards while strangulating human existence.’
    • ‘Using strangulated syntax instead of plain English means that the real meaning can be concealed from all save the magic circle of fellow-professionals who are in on the act.’
    • ‘The car's waist got higher and fatter and the engine became increasingly strangulated by anti-emissions equipment as the years rolled by.’
    • ‘In the more humane 19th cent., however, the sight of poor folk being strangulated for minor offences became less acceptable, and other methods of crime prevention were sought.’
    • ‘In the 1990s and beyond, institutions of higher education in Africa, especially the universities, must contend with several interrelated major problems, whose combined effect threatens to strangulate them…’
    throttle, choke, garrotte
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1Sounding as though the utterer's throat is constricted.
      ‘a strangulated cry’
      • ‘Though he can do all the pro forma stuff in bigger settings, his performances can be stiff and strangulated.’
      • ‘Mason's low, slightly strangulated voice is perfect for suggesting the thin-lipped intensity of his newly unpeeled anger.’
      • ‘The music is volatile: its percussion tribal and its lead like a snake charmer's flute, strangulated forever.’
      • ‘The gruff, strangulated tones seemed to reflect the woman's petulant desires and suffocated potential, making her initially quite grotesque but ultimately deeply sympathetic.’
      • ‘Kristin doesn't so much sing as offer strangulated, childlike whispers that are often double-tracked.’
      • ‘Her voice is as sexy as ever, yet, for such a small venue as the Blue Heron Arts Center, often too loud, and sometimes curiously strangulated.’


Mid 17th century (in the sense ‘suffocate’): from Latin strangulat- choked, from the verb strangulare (see strangle).