Definition of stout in English:



  • 1(of a person) rather fat or of heavy build.

    ‘stout middle-aged men’
    • ‘I'm ushered into a clean, airy office by a small, stout man with merry eyes, a father's face.’
    • ‘It was the father; a rather short, stout man with a feathery blonde mustache, who spoke for the rest.’
    • ‘As the warden gazed out the open door, one of his underlings, a rather stout fellow named Mr. Hersby, approached the nervous man.’
    • ‘And the girl was slightly stout, though nothing compared to the servant.’
    • ‘So, living her dream vicariously through her son, she traipsed him round church halls to entertain audiences of stout women.’
    • ‘She was stout, middle-aged, and veiny in the cheeks and nose.’
    • ‘The door was always locked, but there was a small bell, which said simply Fischer and this, if rung, produced a small, stout man wearing round wire-rimmed glasses.’
    • ‘It was difficult to believe that this, a short, stout man, had put fear in the hearts of wrestlers in the 1980s.’
    • ‘It was lavishly furnished, and behind its wide oak desk, sat a burly and stout man.’
    • ‘She was a stout woman with rosy cheeks and always cheerful.’
    • ‘The slide was flimsy, and if you had the help of a stout friend you could tip it over.’
    • ‘He was stout, well past middle age, and his round cheeks were pink in the winter air as though they had just been shaved.’
    • ‘She was stout enough to be a grandmother, but the hair confined beneath her hair net was dark, and her quick, decisive hands did not seem grandmotherly.’
    • ‘He also said the authors had hurt him by describing him as a ‘short and stout fellow who uses foul language’.’
    • ‘He's stout and middle-aged, wearing a suit - looking totally out of place in the barbaric surroundings.’
    • ‘Higgins, a small stout woman who usually speaks in a booming Irish brogue, nods silently.’
    • ‘I was sitting alone in my favorite restaurant when a short, stout man of middle age asked if he could join me.’
    • ‘He was stout and looked quite like a construction worker.’
    • ‘Her husband, a tall, stout fellow who probably wrestles alligators for fun, stomps ahead, engrossed in the sports pages of the paper.’
    • ‘The waitress was a short stout woman who spoke broken English.’
    fat, fattish, plump, portly, rotund, roly-poly, pot-bellied, round, dumpy, chunky, broad in the beam, overweight, fleshy, paunchy, corpulent
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  • 2(of an object) strong and thick.

    ‘Billy had armed himself with a stout stick’
    ‘stout walking boots’
    • ‘She's a game old bird, though; dashingly dressed in sensible breeches and stout walking boots, she's off down the fairway to confront the offending husband.’
    • ‘He walked along the dirt path with a gray cat, hooded in a brown cloak and carrying a stout walking stick.’
    • ‘I came armed with a pair of stout histories and a promisingly thick archaeological field-guide.’
    • ‘As far as your feet go, some stout old-fashioned walking shoes or boots with gaiters look best and give you the most support.’
    • ‘When walking in the mountains be sure to wear stout boots with a good grip.’
    • ‘It was tall and stout, and a good support for him as he walked, for he could place it before him and so be sure of his next step.’
    • ‘The switching stick serves as a convenient probe; it is stout and unlikely to bend or break in the joint.’
    • ‘At both locations, you can see various types of bamboos, from those as thin as an index finger to stout trunks that are thicker than an arm.’
    • ‘Not only would red sticks protect them, but stout fencing and a location atop a river bluff.’
    • ‘Always travel with stout boots, rainproof clothing, spare clothes, a first aid kid, torch, map, compass, food and drink.’
    • ‘His eyes widened when he picked up the tracks of a man in stout boots and a horse leading away from the clearing.’
    • ‘Engineered with the ergonomics of a spinal column, the highest grade of surgical stainless steel is crafted into stout links of solid metal.’
    • ‘The plants are stout, robust and shrub-like, with reddish stems and greenish-white or reddish-brown flowers produced in narrow, upright clusters.’
    • ‘For those with stout boots and stout hearts, there is a spectacular breathtaking, circular-kilometre walk from the abbey through the mountains.’
    • ‘Taking a stout walking stick to help particularly with the descent is advised.’
    • ‘Long trousers, long sleeves and stout boots are a necessity.’
    • ‘If you have weak knees or ankles, it helps to hire or buy adjustable walking poles, or a stout stick.’
    • ‘Without speaking he lifts me to my feet and brings his stout stick down across my shoulders.’
    • ‘Mother and father are both dressed in walking attire: calf length walking trousers tucked into long socks, stout walking shoes, check shirts, bobble hats and a back pack.’
    • ‘Particularly important are a windproof jacket, or anorak, with hood or hat and a stout pair of walking boots or shoes as they may have to cross some rough ground to see the best wildlife.’
    strong, sturdy, heavy, solid, substantial, robust, tough, strongly made, durable, hard-wearing
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  • 3Having or showing courage and determination.

    ‘he put up a stout defence in court’
    • ‘The Education Secretary yesterday launched a stout defence of the basic principle of top-up fees.’
    • ‘While he might think it a stout defence of his membership, there are those who view that approach as ostrich-like, robbing us of any hope of his assistance in weeding out the bad guys.’
    • ‘One reason for the defense's stout performance is the coaches' ability to make the most of the players' strengths.’
    • ‘York absorbed plenty of pressure from the students who became increasingly aggressive as they became more frustrated at being unable to pierce a stout defence.’
    • ‘His stout defence distracted the Austrians, helping Bonaparte to invade northern Italy and beat them at Marengo.’
    • ‘The Dolphins were favoured to win but ran into some stout defence and a forward pack that grew in confidence throughout the day.’
    • ‘Establishing a flow and chemistry on offense is critical, especially for a team that expects to be competitive behind a stout defense.’
    • ‘His current team depends heavily on the running game and stout defense.’
    • ‘It was time for stout defence and it was forthcoming.’
    • ‘It's a stout defence of the ability of large corporations to sort themselves out while remaining profitably in one piece.’
    • ‘Both sides showed a glimmer of promise with the occasional attack, only to be let down by poor discipline, some shoddy handling and stout defence.’
    • ‘They had to scramble to become the sixth seed in the play-offs, and they've earned a lot of believers with their stout defense and great rushing attack.’
    • ‘Elton's stout defence of his thesis parallels the tenacity of his beliefs regarding the practice of history.’
    • ‘Only Giles, with a mixture of stout defence and calculated hitting, took England past 300, a total they should need to exceed in their second innings if they are to save, or indeed win, the game.’
    • ‘He used a specially-arranged series of interviews during the Commonwealth summit yesterday to mount a stout defence of his position.’
    • ‘Not a theologian, he was unconcerned by doctrinal minutiae; far from encouraging popery his one known theological work was a stout defence of the church against Catholicism.’
    • ‘Ingleton battled gamely to the end, but a stout Kirkby defence kept their fourth clean sheet.’
    • ‘Where was his stout defence of public schooling during the Commonwealth's crusade against state schools?’
    • ‘And, despite some stout defence, a feature of York's game this season, they were unable to prevent scrum half Duffy from scoring from short range.’
    • ‘The lads in maroon were dominating at this stage but a stout Laois defence was denying them the scores.’
    determined, full of determination, vigorous, forceful, spirited, stout-hearted
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  • [mass noun] A kind of strong, dark beer brewed with roasted malt or barley.

    [count noun] ‘microbreweries specialize in ales and stouts’
    • ‘A few ciders and stouts for mixed beer drinks are also a good idea.’
    • ‘Originally, all beers were dark and heavy, similar to the porters, stouts and brown ales of Britain.’
    • ‘The brewery has been exploring the idea since a think tank appointed by the Irish government recommended that low-alcohol versions of beers and stouts be introduced.’
    • ‘The company brews its own selection of nine stouts, ales and lagers in Dublin using chemical-free, unpasteurised brewing methods.’
    • ‘He also points to a fondness for strong drink taken neat; whisky and vodka rather than English ale or Irish stout.’
    • ‘With beers, stouts and ales of such quality on tap all weekend, the visitors may well have had a few pointers for the organisers of the Munich festival.’
    • ‘He adds that the 80 or so brews on offer, including bitters, milds, porters, stouts, wheat beers and real lagers, will range in strength between three and eight per cent and alcohol by volume.’
    • ‘High prices for soft drinks and bottled water in many pubs and hotels means it works out cheaper for customers to order beers and stouts than to opt for a non-alcoholic alternative.’
    • ‘It's too easy to say that lagers have a clean hoppy character, stouts and porters have roasted flavours, and wheat beers, fruity and clove ones.’
    • ‘Don't substitute a dark ale or stout for the light beer here; it can be too bitter.’
    • ‘We do still get requests for some of the chewier beers like porters and stouts but the light beers are big.’
    • ‘A lot of those heavier beers - porters, stouts, bocks and such - are available year round from many brewers.’
    • ‘In Wednesday's budget, he is expected to slash the duty that breweries have to pay on ale, beer and stout.’
    • ‘Beer can range from light ales to dark stouts depending on the proportions of malt and barley.’
    • ‘I fully enjoyed sampling a variety of beer from European Pilsners to stouts.’
    • ‘The most common, or at least best known are lager, ale, stout and Pilsner.’
    • ‘Cider represents a fourth Irish drink, one that is traditional, light and crisp, and appeals to drinkers who might not be interested in stouts, whiskeys, or cream liqueurs.’
    • ‘Finally, different beer styles have their own colour distinctions: golden for Pilsners, amber for most pale ales, black or near-black for stouts and so on.’
    • ‘A drink generally means beer, either lager or stout.’
    • ‘Even in England, the traditional home of ales, lagers grow bigger and bigger, placing not only ales, but stouts, porters and other brews in the shade.’


Middle English: from Anglo-Norman French and Old French dialect, of West Germanic origin; perhaps related to stilt. The noun (late 17th century) originally denoted any strong beer and is probably elliptical for stout ale.