Main definitions of stoop in English

: stoop1stoop2

stoop1

verb

[no object]
  • 1Bend one's head or body forwards and downwards.

    ‘he stooped down and reached towards the coin’
    ‘Linda stooped to pick up the bottles’
    with object ‘the man stoops his head’
    • ‘Evelyn stooped down and picked the six-year-old girl up.’
    • ‘Finn stooped down next to the bright, crystal clear water and started scooping handfuls of water into his mouth.’
    • ‘She would have stooped to retrieve her knives had he not waved his own at her threateningly.’
    • ‘Adam stooped down and picked up the object, careful shutting the lid and placing it back on her nightstand.’
    • ‘My balance regained, I stooped down to pick up the overgrown puppy that immediately began licking my face once it was within reach.’
    • ‘I was pruning the flowerbeds, mowing the grass, that sort of thing, and had just stooped down to pick up a piece of litter when a red rubber ball landed about twenty centimetres from me.’
    • ‘A wave of guilt washed over me and I stooped down to pick him up.’
    • ‘He stooped down to the window and looked right at me, grinning.’
    • ‘He stoops to recover the horseshoe from where it lies.’
    • ‘After looking around for a few seconds, he stooped down to pick up a snail shell he found on the sidewalk.’
    • ‘Hands trembling, he stooped down to pick them off the road and steadied himself with one hand on the truck.’
    • ‘Borrowing a pen from another tourist, she stooped down to the boy's level.’
    • ‘Jorge stooped down, picked it up and dusted it off.’
    • ‘Then, she pointed at the towering hill and at herself, then stooped down and wrote in the sand with her finger.’
    • ‘The gentleman stooped down and plucked one of the blooms from its bed.’
    • ‘A man never stands so tall as when he stoops to help a child.’
    • ‘I stooped down to pick up a book and then handed it to her.’
    • ‘David grinned and stooped down beside his daughter.’
    • ‘He stooped down and carefully peered around the doorway, both ways.’
    • ‘He turned his back on me, went over to the generator, stooped and retrieved something.’
    • ‘He stooped down to touch the road, then straightened up, worried.’
    • ‘Instinctively Loretta stooped down to pick it up.’
    • ‘He then stooped down next to me and ran a hand over my hair.’
    • ‘I spun towards the voice, stooping to grab my knife.’
    • ‘Mal shrugged as he stooped down to look into the car.’
    bend down, bend, lean over, lean down, kneel, crouch down, squat down, hunker down, hunch down
    lower, bend, incline, bow, duck
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Have the head and shoulders habitually bent forwards.
      ‘he tends to stoop when he walks’
      • ‘His injuries healed but as he grew bigger the scar tissue contracted and he began to stoop like an old man.’
      • ‘During the Brixton riots inquiry in 1981 his tall, stooping figure appeared regularly on television.’
      • ‘Though he stoops over as if gravity is dragging down his meaty shoulders, Rod standing tall is six feet six inches and 270 pounds.’
      hunch one's shoulders, walk with a stoop, be round-shouldered
      View synonyms
  • 2Lower one's moral standards so far as to do something reprehensible.

    ‘Craig wouldn't stoop to thieving’
    ‘she was unwilling to believe that anyone could stoop so low as to steal from a dead woman’
    • ‘When you see ideological opponents stoop to a barrage of personal insults, do you think that they've scored a political point?’
    • ‘I think it's absolutely despicable that anyone could stoop so low as to steal something from a children's ward.’
    • ‘Would Edward stoop so low as to kill them all?’
    • ‘If some moron can stoop so low as to steal a wheelchair from an 82-year-old lady, what are we coming to?’
    • ‘Try to be communicative with other people in your class but if that doesn't work do not stoop to their level.’
    • ‘I don't believe our youths would stoop so low as to desecrate the graves or vandalise the cemetery.’
    • ‘If I, and all my friends, had given her the love and encouragement she so obviously needed, perhaps she wouldn't have felt the need to stoop to these depths to try and gain our attention.’
    • ‘I'm sure nobody around here would stoop so low as to put their muck in our dustbin, but word gets around about these things and you may not realise the lengths some unscrupulous types will go to.’
    • ‘Ask yourself - when you hear your political adversaries stoop to empty insults like this, do you feel that they're helping their cause or hurting it?’
    • ‘It is astonishing the columnist could stoop so low.’
    • ‘Could anyone in tinsel town stoop so low?’
    • ‘Why am I not surprised that they would stoop to cheating?’
    • ‘It's really sad for them that they have to stoop to these awful things and it just shows what kinds of people we are dealing with.’
    • ‘I wouldn't stoop low enough to go directly to his house to see him.’
    • ‘When we raised our concerns to the senators lining up to oppose Ashcroft, they of course protested they would never stoop to such bigotry.’
    • ‘We, the virtuous local media, would never stoop so low!’
    • ‘Nor would they stoop to depriving the downtrodden fans of a struggling club of an adored star just by offering him some filthy money and the chance of European football.’
    • ‘I feel relieved in a sense because people have been killed or injured for less but I feel disgusted that people can stoop to that level.’
    • ‘The fact that he is willing to stoop to this sort of outright revisionism in order to make his point demonstrates the abject lack of substance to his arguments.’
    • ‘However, we cannot continue to stoop to their level, because it removes our right to righteous indignation at their atrocities.’
    lower oneself, sink, descend, resort
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1archaic with infinitive Condescend to do something.
      ‘the princes now and then stooped to pay a nominal homage’
      • ‘He would not stoop to ask for any man's compliments, praises, flatteries; and he would be far above exacting them.’
      • ‘He does not stoop to deny the charge against the president, instead he points out the signifier of the true moralist: the man who tears up the constitution when politically expedient.’
  • 3(of a bird of prey) swoop down on a quarry.

    ‘we witnessed an eagle stooping on its prey’
    • ‘I found this out recently when I suddenly got the urge to go, having seen a falcon stoop at a distance as I was driving.’
    • ‘Occasionally, a kite stoops and grabs a dragonfly, one of its favorite meals.’
    • ‘Splendid aerial displays are described, the birds climbing several hundred feet before stooping at tremendous speed at each other until almost at ground-level when the performance is repeated.’

noun

  • 1in singular A posture in which the head and shoulders are habitually bent forwards.

    ‘a tall, thin man with a stoop’
    • ‘His sprightly frame is totally erect with not a hint of a stoop and his quick stride and purposeful gait would put men half his age to shame.’
    • ‘He walked with a stoop and a rolling gait, the once upright take-on-the-world stance of the magnificent athlete now reduced to a shambling stagger.’
    • ‘Now 71, he is tanned and tall, with a slight stoop.’
    • ‘He was walking with a pronounced stoop, gleefully rubbing his hands together and grinning like a maniac.’
    • ‘Tuck was angular and lean, with a slight stoop, as he is today.’
    • ‘He noticed a beginning, almost imperceptible touch of red around her eyes, a stoop to her shoulders that had not been there before.’
    • ‘The elderly man is of medium height and build, wearing glasses and walking with a slight stoop.’
    hunch, droop of the shoulders, sag of the shoulders
    View synonyms
  • 2The downward swoop of a bird of prey.

    • ‘There was a horrible sensation of plunging into the abyss, falling, falling as swiftly as a falcon in stoop.’
    • ‘They descended on the village like a falcon in stoop.’
    • ‘We were watching Annie, another centre falconer, luring a young lanner through a pattern of stoops and dives after a pair of meat-garnished, dried wings swung on a long cord.’

Origin

Old English stūpian (verb), of Germanic origin; related to the adjective steep. Both senses of the noun date from the late 16th century.

Pronunciation

stoop

/stuːp/

Main definitions of stoop in English

: stoop1stoop2

stoop2

noun

North American
  • A porch with steps in front of a house or other building.

    • ‘Lately, I have noticed a man sitting on the stoop of an apartment building near mine.’
    • ‘It ended with a long kiss on my stoop and his promise to call the next day.’
    • ‘I was legitimately surprised when I saw Tucker, along with Emma and Hayden standing on the front stoop of my father's house.’
    • ‘He was there standing on the front stoop, hands stuck in his pockets.’
    • ‘What I remember most is sitting on the back stoop of the house, crying.’
    • ‘Concrete is popular for sidewalks, parking pads, patios, dumpster pads, front stoops, recreational areas, driveways, curbs, gutters and much more.’
    • ‘The ferryman was watching from the stoop of a nearby clapboard house as we rolled up.’
    • ‘They opened the door, and slowly stepped out onto the stoop, looking out at the land in front of them.’
    • ‘When I bought my house, there were immense, ball-shaped evergreens on either side of the front stoop.’
    • ‘The Sunday New York Times, wrapped in blue plastic, already was on the front stoop, and the smell of coffee was floating up from the kitchen.’
    • ‘Around here, neighbors yelled to each other from their front stoops.’
    • ‘We've been sitting on the front stoop of an unlit house, blinking into the darkness, waiting, or so we thought.’
    • ‘I even let James kiss me on the stoop and it feels okay.’
    • ‘She stepped up onto the stoop and fumbled around the doorway for the keypad.’
    • ‘Emma stormed out of the manor and collapsed on the front stoop in tears.’
    • ‘The boy stands outside on the stoop of his house finishing the rest of his toast.’
    • ‘Momentarily, I will get up, take a few steps down the hallway, and peek out onto our front stoop.’
    • ‘About ten minutes later, we were sitting on the stoop of his building, putting on our roller blades.’
    • ‘She sets her buckets on the front stoop and pauses before opening the door.’
    • ‘Jackson was sitting on the stoop early in the morning, when the birds were just beginning to call and the sky was grey.’

Origin

Mid 18th century: from Dutch stoep (see stoep).

Pronunciation

stoop

/stuːp/