Definition of stollen in English:

stollen

noun

  • A rich German fruit and nut loaf.

    • ‘Go next door, where they're serving stollen and rum balls.’
    • ‘It's a quick mix of three forms of cranberries - perfect for spooning onto toasted holiday breads, stollen, crackers, and biscuits to satisfy during those early morning hours.’
    • ‘Nuts, marzipan, stollen and puddings will generally contain some allergens.’
    • ‘Place the marzipan in the center of the stollen.’
    • ‘Whether it is the towering panettone and pandoro of Italy, the fruit-studded crown of French kugelhopf or the oblong stollens of Germany, it is the shape that distinguishes the bread as celebratory and regional.’
    • ‘The tables were laden with home made pork pies, stollen and brandy butter, decorations were festooned from the lights, candles twinkled away amidst wreathes of holly.’
    • ‘Like pandoro, stollen, or koeckbotteram, brioche is often referred to as a ‘rich yeast bread’ because the dough is enriched with a generous amount of butter and eggs.’
    • ‘It is also the home of a distinctive Christmas cake, Dresdner stollen.’
    • ‘One newspaper diary seemed to become mildly obsessed - and rather offended - by my weight loss, suggesting its readers send me ‘gifts of stollen and mince pies’ for Christmas.’
    • ‘Dresden stollen is one of the most famous German Christmas breads; plainer Stollen are also made, some aniseed flavoured, as are springerle biscuits.’
    • ‘This time, they had come out with rye breads, baguettes, brotchen, sourdough bread, zopf, German stollen, multi-grain bread and rolls.’
    • ‘Stephen forgets, of course, that Christmas is approaching; and if you want to do your bit to feed the shrinking rightwinger, send gifts of stollen and mince pies care of Civitas.’
    • ‘You could just as easily use stollen or even Christmas cake.’
    • ‘Invert a stollen timbale in the center of a plate, remove the mold, and dust with confectioners' sugar.’
    • ‘Today's Dresden Stollen Festival, which has been celebrated every year since 1994, re-enacts the historical event of the giant stollen, with a 3,500 kilogram cake shown at the Dresden Zwinger.’
    • ‘With all the growth along Colorado's Front Range, a small town that cherishes any tradition - be it a buttery, fruit-filled stollen or a historic shopping district - makes a nice escape.’

Origin

From German Stollen.

Pronunciation:

stollen

/ˈstɒlən//ˈʃtɒlən/