Definition of stitchbird in English:

stitchbird

noun

  • A rare New Zealand honeyeater with mainly dark brown or blackish plumage and a sharp call that resembles the word ‘stitch’.

    • ‘The stitchbird is sexually dimorphic, the males being larger and more colourful than the female.’
    • ‘He visited the island in 1882 and collected some 150 stitchbirds knowing that they had already disappeared from the mainland.’
    • ‘Sixty stitchbirds from Tiri Tiri Matangi are to be transferred to the Sanctuary as part of a national stitchbird recovery programme recently announced by the Prime Minister.’
    • ‘Of the 170 species of honeyeaters in Australia and the Pacific Islands, only three - the tui, the bellbird, and the stitchbird (the latter surviving only on offshore islands) - are found in New Zealand.’
    • ‘The upshot of all this is that to move the stitchbird from Meliphagoidea to Corvoidea is a fairly significant shift.’
    • ‘The saddleback had survived only on Hen Island; the stitchbird had vanished except on Little Barrier Island.’
    • ‘He said stitchbirds have been successfully transferred to Tiritiri Matangi and Kapiti islands, but require intensive human management to survive.’
    • ‘Mt Bruce now has six adult stitchbirds for its captive breeding programme.’
    • ‘The stitch in time saves nine brochure tells the story well and with only $17,000 raised we know that the days for our stitchbird may well be numbered.’
    • ‘Kapiti is home to birds only seen in sanctuaries or on islands including stitchbirds, North Island saddlebacks, takahe and Little Spotted kiwi.’
    • ‘The stitchbird was the eighth of nine native bird species set free on Tiri since the auspicious freedom flight of the parakeets in 1974.’
    • ‘When we got to the island, we were most anxious to see the stitchbird, since this was the only place where we would encounter this unusual honeyeater.’
    • ‘This incredible place is where you can have endangered takahe nibbling around your boots, and see kokako, saddlebacks and stitchbirds competing with abundant tui and bellbirds for space.’
    • ‘The only birds occasionally known to mate face-to-face, stitchbirds, were down to one isolated population.’
    • ‘For years it was widely held that the stitchbird was part of the tui and bellbird family of honeyeaters.’
    • ‘A new strain of the bacteria has killed 10 rare stitchbirds, or hihi, on Tiritiri Matangi Island.’
    • ‘He says that the reason for the failure of previous transfers involving stitchbirds could be a natural shortage of carbohydrate food, such as nectar and fruit, for the birds to eat.’
    • ‘A number of these, such as the stitchbird and red-crowned parakeet, have gone from the mainland and survive only on small offshore islands.’
    • ‘Officials the Karori Wildlife Sanctuary in Wellington say they have doubled the numbers of the tiny hihi, or stitchbirds, since the program began, the Dominion Post reported.’
    • ‘All images, except for MG 6438 which is a female, are of male stitchbirds.’

Pronunciation:

stitchbird

/ˈstɪtʃbəːd/