Main definitions of stint in English

: stint1stint2

stint1

verb

  • 1with object, often with negative Supply a very ungenerous or inadequate amount of (something)

    ‘stowage room hasn't been stinted’
    • ‘My progress has been stinted by my commitment to tutoring over the last couple of months - a welcome change from continuous writing, but still it has drawn me away from my work.’
    • ‘Publicly, he had stated his desire to stay at Everton and his never stinting determination for their cause appeared to back up such a claim.’
    • ‘Just as he stints discussion of aesthetics, so he repeatedly writes as if authorial intention were merely instrumental, a matter of having one's say about certain issues.’
    • ‘Some asked indignant questions about why his host in Japan was stinting the money required to send his body home.’
    • ‘In striking contrast he asserts that ‘[God's] wisdom hath stinted the effects of his power ’.’
    • ‘He doesn't stint the darker sides of the story.’
    • ‘He played his part well, paying no girl more attention than another, but never stinting his smiles and nods.’
    • ‘One place where TJ's has never stinted is with its employees.’
    • ‘First, federal education spending under him is up nearly 50 percent over the final year of the past presidency, so the coalition's charge that the president is stinting the schools is just bunk.’
    • ‘Their omelet chef makes excellent omelets and definitely doesn't stint on the ingredients.’
    • ‘An obvious test is, are you stinting your family to fund your habit?’
    • ‘Emotions were stinted, lines were rushed, some of the acting was wooden.’
    • ‘While buffers can help mitigate the impact of jitter and wander, they also serve to increase one-way latency, which may stint a conversation.’
    1. 1.1 Restrict (someone) in the amount of something, especially money, given or permitted.
      ‘to avoid having to stint yourself, budget in advance’
      • ‘I know, too, that she frequently stinted herself to give me food.’
      • ‘It really is a completion of something that gives me strength in my work, to be able to go and explore and do things, and also it stints me in certain things about what I would do, because I have children now.’
      • ‘He could have stinted him.’
      • ‘She is a widow who has spent her every mite in the prosecution of Allan's career, stinting herself so that Esther can eventually be ‘the doctor's wife’.’
      • ‘William and his family had not stinted themselves either.’
    2. 1.2no object Be very economical or mean about spending or providing something.
      ‘he doesn't stint on wining and dining’
      • ‘This doesn't mean you should stint on creativity.’
      • ‘He assured me he didn't believe in stinting on pain medication.’
      • ‘The play is daring enough to address the story's deep pathos and also doesn't stint on the ugly emotional and intellectual subtext built into every similar family horror story.’
      • ‘Business facilities at the hotel are extensive, and there are also several restaurants and bars for less formal meetings without stinting on elegance.’
      • ‘When you encounter something truly inspiring don't stint on film.’
      • ‘However this drama plays out, he won't have to stint on golf balls when he retires.’
      • ‘St Petersburg Ballet Theatre, now 10 years old, is a regular and popular visitor to Britain, and it doesn't stint on its coverage.’
      • ‘When the town set up the recent show in his honour, they didn't stint on the celebrations.’
      • ‘As evidence that it doesn't stint on hard drama, two more actors are cast as ‘Japanese customs officers’.’
      • ‘Having designed a center that revels in the exuberant complexities of Columbus Circle, Time Warner's architects stint on the details.’
      • ‘Don't stint on taking out full cover on your home, its contents, your car and travel risks.’
      • ‘Stinting on infrastructural allocations may leave potholes for three years, but stinting on higher education means closing off access for three years and losing a generation.’
      • ‘You can, of course, substitute pumpkin for the squash, but whatever you do, don't stint on the spinach.’
      • ‘Their omelet chef makes excellent omelets and definitely doesn't stint on the ingredients.’
      • ‘He doesn't stint on the hardcore action, but infuses it with artful shots of ocean waves and abstract leaf patterns that give it a sense of poetry.’
      • ‘Know what you are trying to achieve and don't stint on the preparation.’
      • ‘His menus are, like most in Brittany, mainly based on the fresh rich pickings of the sea: simply cooked with the minimum of fuss and, apart from the optional menu diétetique, rarely stinting on the butter and cream.’
      • ‘By stinting on the stonework needed for the projects, they obtained some 10 million yuan they were not entitled to from government.’
      • ‘Not stinting on marketing and promotion, they soon filled empty auditoriums.’
      • ‘But this new pride in the provincial doesn't mean actors can stint on their elocution lessons.’
      skimp on, scrimp on, be economical with, economize on, be sparing with, hold back on, be frugal with
      View synonyms

noun

  • 1A person's fixed or allotted period of work.

    ‘his varied career included a stint as a magician’
    • ‘His early career included stints selling ducks and chickens in an open air market in his hometown of Xinxiang, as well as running a roadside stand hawking barbecued meat sticks.’
    • ‘His Chinese work stints started purely by accident, Miriam recalls.’
    • ‘Her track record has included stints fronting shows such as Top of the Pops, The Movie Chart Show and the sports reality show The Games.’
    • ‘Between stints levelling out the kitchen floor and painting a Noah's Ark mural in the dining room, the Transform team chose to devise some simple lessons.’
    • ‘A three-year stint in Hollywood has made the 59-year-old unashamed of selling products, ideas and himself.’
    • ‘The new council would be selected to a three-year stint beginning February 28, 2004.’
    • ‘His career included stints as papal secretary and chancellor of Florence.’
    • ‘His early career included floor managing stints with the BBC and Granada, and he worked on the first series of Till Death Us Do Part in the mid-1960s.’
    • ‘However, his assignment at VW may prove tougher than his three-year stint at Chrysler.’
    • ‘He just completed a three-year stint as a tour representative for Ping, a maker of golf equipment.’
    • ‘During their brief stints the interns are schooled in organizing techniques and tactics.’
    • ‘Jim, whose two Lockington coaching stints started 17 years apart, was the playing-coach in the team in which Young won his honour.’
    • ‘After a seven-month stint James had resigned, citing a conflict of interest with programs being pursued by the association.’
    • ‘After two relatively brief stints pastoring in New York and Bolton, Connecticut, he served as a tutor at his alma mater in New Haven from 1724 to 1726.’
    • ‘He later moved to software company NCR as a project leader, before doing a three-year stint for the Commercial Bank of Kuwait, designing its Visa credit card system.’
    • ‘After a three-year stint in the military, he headed for Hollywood, where his charms were first noticed in a men's room.’
    • ‘Kay's career also included stints at Atari, Apple, and Disney.’
    • ‘After an 11-year stint his show was dropped in 1982, but revived again in 1998.’
    • ‘He served a record 10 years as speaker of the House, and during most of that stint a Republican was in the Oval Office.’
    • ‘David and his team will be taking turns, doing one and a half to two hour stints each and are aiming for a time of 24 to 25 hours.’
    spell, stretch, period, time, turn, run, session, term
    View synonyms
  • 2mass noun Limitation of supply or effort.

    ‘a collector with an eye for quality and the means to indulge it without stint’
    • ‘But it is said that in Cuba and Brazil this increase of slave labour, without stint or limit, is acting wholesomely, in checking the importation by creating a fear of the slaves themselves.’
    • ‘Accordingly he made presents and wasted money without stint.’
    • ‘Food there was, without stint, for three times the men who were fated to live upon it.’
    • ‘The Democratic Party is intent on maintaining Carhart and the whole panoply of current abortion rights, without stint or moderation.’

Origin

Old English styntan ‘make blunt’, of Germanic origin; related to stunt.

Pronunciation

stint

/stɪnt/

Main definitions of stint in English

: stint1stint2

stint2

noun

  • A small short-legged sandpiper of northern Eurasia and Alaska, with a brownish back and white underparts.

    Genus Calidris, family Scolopacidae: four species

    • ‘The Semipalmated Sandpiper is a small shorebird in the group known as peeps or stints.’
    • ‘International birders include four Eurasian sandpipers, called stints, on the peeps roster.’
    • ‘In the Adyar river, black winged stilts, three varieties of egrets and migrants such as golden plovers, sand pipers and little stints are to be found.’
    • ‘More than half a dozen species of birds have come to roost, which include black-winged stilts, cattle and little egrets, little stints, common sandpipers, pond herons and little winged plovers.’
    • ‘There were peeps, probably some types of stints, larger redshank sized birds and some Tringa species.’

Origin

Middle English: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

stint

/stɪnt/