Definition of stink in English:

stink

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1Have a strong unpleasant smell:

    ‘the place stank like a sewer’
    ‘his breath stank of drink’
    • ‘The air stank of burned plastic for at least two days after the attack.’
    • ‘My room stank from the smell of tar today, thanks to the re-paving of the road outside my courtyard.’
    • ‘He was leaning in and his breath stank of alcohol.’
    • ‘The place stank of sour beer and cigarette smoke.’
    • ‘Soldiers said that the city just doesn't stink as it did when they arrived to find sewers backed up all over the place and mounds of rotting garbage.’
    • ‘His head was shaved and his black track suit stank of sweat and cigarette smoke.’
    • ‘The Ylang Ylang scent, which I feared would stink like rutting pandas, smells like very old people.’
    • ‘The guy that grabbed me stank of alcohol and started to sway me back and forth.’
    • ‘Sometimes you can stink without letting off a smell and people will still keep away.’
    • ‘The River Croal was an open sewer and the middens stank all through the year.’
    • ‘This room stunk so badly we could not stay in it for very long.’
    • ‘She likes to relate the time a cat had a litter in her clothing, and how horrible her wardrobe stunk afterwards.’
    • ‘What a sad, sad sight to see him there in his white apron, stinking from the smell of salami.’
    • ‘It stunk like there was a dead body inside it, and perhaps there was.’
    • ‘To explore the hole you needed a very long ladder and a strong constitution: it stank and was crawling with rats.’
    • ‘The floor stank of sweat and urine, and Rave could hardly breathe.’
    • ‘He smelled of musky cologne and his mouth stank of beer.’
    • ‘We decided to leave and came back in half an hour but the place absolutely stank.’
    • ‘It was jelly-like and it stunk horribly, like butter gone off or old chip pan oil.’
    • ‘His breath stank of alcohol, despite the early hour.’
    reek, smell bad, smell disgusting, smell foul, smell to high heaven, stink to high heaven, give off a bad smell
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    1. 1.1stink somewhere out/upinformal [with object] Fill somewhere with a strong unpleasant smell:
      ‘her perfume stank the place out’
      • ‘We think that the fish used to stink the place up were stolen from a refrigerator that Hunter uses for the demonstration ingredients for his show.’
      • ‘The RSPCA have done their best for the poor chap, but things just aren't looking too good, and it appears we'll have a dead whale stinking the place up for the New Year.’
      • ‘I couldn't see anything around the back, so I just hoped whatever it was would decompose quickly and stop stinking the place up.’
      • ‘Fourthly, rats are smelly animals that stink the room out.’
      • ‘Besides which, the fish carcases do not stink your dustbin up for days.’
      • ‘You had a fire in your garden that was stinking my house out.’
      • ‘Okay, so you could buy a mackerel for a £1 these days but who wants to stink the entire house out for a week?’
      reek, smell bad, smell disgusting, smell foul, smell to high heaven, stink to high heaven, give off a bad smell
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  • 2informal Be very unpleasant, contemptible, or scandalous:

    ‘he thinks the values of our society stink’
    • ‘The success of Angela's Ashes spawned a spate of memoirs-by-nobody-in-particular, most of which, frankly, stunk.’
    • ‘‘I'd rather you told me I stunk,’ I said, ‘than tell me I lost the job because of my race.’’
    • ‘‘I caught the first fifteen minutes of Absolute Power and thought it stunk, but I wouldn't want to clog this thread up with a post about why,’ he said in the Extras thread.’
    • ‘It can also be very revealing if you loved the movie and he thinks it stunk.’
    • ‘The first half hour, visually ‘influenced’ by Fellowship of the Ring, is so poorly written it stinks like an episode of Hercules with an extra $14 in the budget.’
    • ‘We got three issues out before we realized we stunk at selling ads and subscriptions.’
    be very unpleasant, be abhorrent, be despicable, be contemptible, be disgusting, be vile, be foul
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    1. 2.1stink of Be highly suggestive of (something regarded with disapproval):
      ‘the whole affair stinks of a set-up’
      • ‘The whole thing stinks of desperation - desperation to seem cool, to seem relevant, to be popular.’
      • ‘Whether it's pitch battles, boardroom corruption, manager's bungs or ticket tout scandals, the whole league stinks of sleaze.’
      • ‘But most of all, the whole project simply stank of arrogance.’
      • ‘The whole thing stinks of favoritism, especially as, according to several Borg drones, the Linux angle was already being pursued in-house.’
      • ‘The whole thing stank of a setup and police impropriety.’
      • ‘From what he had gathered from the Marines, however, the whole thing stank of an ambush.’
      • ‘Granted, nothing I have offered is conclusive, but this whole issue really stinks of fraud.’
      • ‘The whole thing stank of a concerted attempt to ride the wave of bad publicity games were getting in the mainstream press at the time.’
      • ‘The whole Diana story stinks of lies and deception.’
      • ‘He was the front runner, and the whole affair stank of the worst kind of partisan hackery.’
      strongly suggest, have all the hallmarks of, smack of, give the impression of
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    2. 2.2stink of Have or appear to have a scandalously large amount of (something, especially money):
      ‘the whole place was luxurious and stank of money’
      • ‘The office carried the stink of money and power.’
      • ‘The place still stinks of money - and not just the old double-barrelled wealth traditionally associated with the club.’
      • ‘The room absolutely stank of fear and pain.’
      • ‘Back in the eighties when the money was flowing, the place stank of evil and unacceptable moral standards, pretty much like today, except that the economy is in the toilet.’
      • ‘‘A Day Like Today’ signals the fact his follow up reeks with polish and immaculate production values, stinking of money and thoughtfulness in all the right places.’

noun

  • 1A strong unpleasant smell; a stench:

    ‘the stink of the place hit me as I went in’
    • ‘There's been a stink in my classroom, for a week now, we couldn't figure out where it was coming from, but it smelled like metho.’
    • ‘‘But the stink was putrid, the smells were absolutely awful,’ he said.’
    • ‘There was a slight breeze, and I neatly managed to avoid the worst of the stink.’
    • ‘The huge mounds of refuse have gone and so has the stink.’
    • ‘Since the intervention of the special unit, the stink at the school had been slowly dissipating, sources said.’
    • ‘There was an odd stink, but the house seemed clean.’
    • ‘It's supposed to cover up the stench of stale pee, but the disinfectant stink is almost as bad.’
    • ‘I hope nobody ever has to smell the stink that my family and neighbors are experiencing.’
    • ‘The stink is loathsome and high where wasted rubbish gets disposed off uncaringly in an open public place.’
    • ‘At times you can smell the stink, hear the rats running in his shack, and feel the numbing cold.’
    • ‘The stink in the dining room is as bad as garbage smell.’
    • ‘He could still smell the stink, but his nose was sort of numb now and he didn't care.’
    • ‘Even if the gas wasn't poisonous, the stink was still unpleasant.’
    • ‘Interestingly, even though the stink from this particular city stretch is so powerful that strong men quaver, the authorities are apparently contemplating introducing boating in the Canal.’
    • ‘In Warheads, while demonstrating irritant-gas, a mercenary trainer tells the film team: ‘The stink is so strong, you'll get a whiff of it too’.’
    • ‘Unmindful of the rain and the stink, several drove down, specially to catch the sight of rain lashing the lake, and yes, get themselves drenched to the skin.’
    • ‘I opened a window in an attempt to circulate some air and get the cigarette stink off of Ben and I, and it happened to be making one young thing in the back cold.’
    • ‘I daren't put clothes in it until I am happy with the smell as I don't want them to absorb the stink.’
    • ‘Once I tried reading the Herald on a car trip to Sydney, but it's a broadsheet and with the newsprint stink, I spewed all over the business pages.’
    • ‘It smells terrible, and the stink was getting into my house, my van and other houses nearby.’
    stench, reek, foul smell, bad smell, fetidness, effluvium, malodour, malodorousness, miasma
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  • 2informal A row or fuss:

    ‘a silly move now would kick up a stink we couldn't handle’
    • ‘Milltown residents have been creating a stink about raw sewerage that is flowing into a river in the village.’
    • ‘The stink travelled with them, like body odour.’
    • ‘The project's caused quite a stink among victims' rights groups and staunch conservatives.’
    • ‘‘They can do it but the political stink will be quite intense,’ he said.’
    • ‘Disgruntled natives of Boyle are creating a stink over a decision by Beirne's Bins to revise their pricing policy.’
    • ‘Dragging this old case up will create such a stink, it will pit neighbour against neighbour.’
    • ‘Why think when it's so less demanding to simply raise a stink?’
    • ‘Of course, the kid threw up a stink, started yelling and screaming, and its elder sister had to drag it off for a replacement.’
    • ‘One theory was put my way when the stink over Coke and Pepsi broke out which I present now for your consideration.’
    • ‘He is out of office because he's raising a stink,’ says a Taradale resident.’
    • ‘They prove their mettle daily, without making such a stink.’
    • ‘However an Enniscrone businessman said he was considering withholding payment of his rates in protest at the on-gong stink.’
    • ‘If I were on trial and I got even so much as a hint that the judge might be biased against me, I'd certainly raise a stink about it.’
    • ‘In mid-August, a group of mainland Chinese business executives made such a stink at a Chicago hardware fair that most attendants were left perplexed and appalled.’
    • ‘If it's nothing special, why are the first-mentioned group of people kicking up such a stink?’
    • ‘If the council wishes to take action I will be quite pleased because I will really raise a stink about this.’
    • ‘The sight of the brightly coloured Royal Parade Lilies has caused a real stink among Sinn Fein representatives.’
    • ‘Residents causing a stink over chemical emissions from a business park - which left them unable to open their windows because of the stench - have persuaded Pendle Council to investigate.’
    • ‘York council's plan to change the rubbish collection from weekly to fortnightly has caused a right stink, as one whiff of our letters pages confirms.’
    • ‘The Australian Workers Union who represent production line employees of Ion in Adelaide have raised a stink about this arrangement, to no avail.’
    fuss, commotion, rumpus, ruckus, trouble, outcry, uproar, brouhaha, furore
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adjective

West Indian
  • 1Having a strong unpleasant smell:

    ‘‘What you doing with that stink dog?’’
    • ‘I'm trying that right now, but I can't have this stink situation put a damper on my session situation.’
    • ‘It follows a fleeing him like a stink cloud, misconstruing his running away as an opportunity to take more pictures and ask more questions.’
    • ‘Giant oil drum of sludge in a back closet next to the bathroom: someone bumped the lid off this with a bit of equipment and immediately vomited due to the stench that came out from the stink barrel.’
  • 2Contemptible; corrupt:

    ‘the whole episode is so stink that the principal asked for an immediate transfer of the teacher’
    • ‘I can't really think of any, and if that's all there are, then, isn't that a stink reason to give your sovereignty away?’

Phrases

  • like stink

    • informal Extremely hard or intensely:

      ‘she's working like stink to get everything ready’
      • ‘You can do that - but even those people work like stink,’ she says.’
      • ‘One thing that really helps my attitude is thinking about setting records when the wind isn't blowing like stink.’
      • ‘They have ended up separating, hating each other's guts, taking law suits out against each other, and fighting like stink over the property.’
      • ‘This bike goes like stink and handles like a dream.’
      • ‘So - while keeping my legs crossed and writing like stink - I have to assume that we sheilas are the new economic magic bullet.’

Origin

Old English stincan, of West Germanic origin; related to Dutch and German stinken, also to stench.

Pronunciation:

stink

/stɪŋk/