Definition of sting in the tail in English:

sting in the tail

phrase

  • An unexpected, typically unpleasant or problematic end to something.

    ‘the Budget comes with a sting in the tail—future tax increases’
    • ‘‘Motorists got off lightly on petrol prices in the Budget but this is the sting in the tail,’ said a SIMI chief executive.’
    • ‘And there was a sting in the tail for HBOS, who after leading Adlington CC at half time saw their opponents recover in the second half to win 193-144.’
    • ‘But there could be a sting in the tail, with the unexpected surge in jobs putting another interest rate hike back on the RBA's agenda.’
    • ‘It is a sting in the tail for livestock farmers who had welcomed DEFRA's decision to reduce the movement standstill from 20 days to six.’
    • ‘However, there is a sting in the tail - men in Southampton are paid £2.57 an hour more compared to women, even though the Equal Pay Act came into force 35 years ago.’
    • ‘While he extended the current venture capital trust schemes, research and development tax credits and capital allowances, there was a surprise sting in the tail for those running some of Britain's smallest enterprises.’
    • ‘For many companies the only alternative to the EMI is an unapproved option scheme, which has a nasty national insurance contribution sting in the tail.’
    • ‘While he agrees it's a good outcome for shareholders, he believes there could be a sting in the tail for investors as the big players consider their options.’
    • ‘The ‘contingent workforce’ has begun to feel the sting in the tail of ‘flexibility’ and the dart came from none other than Microsoft itself.’
    • ‘If the benchmarking body does not deliver parity of pay, then we will deliver the sting in the tail.’