Main definitions of stile in English

: stile1stile2

stile1

noun

  • An arrangement of steps that allows people but not animals to climb over a fence or wall.

    • ‘Head through the bridle-gate, then walk straight up the steep grassy bank on to reach a stile over a fence.’
    • ‘I climbed a stile, stepped onto uneven turf and followed what I thought must be the route of the footpath I identified.’
    • ‘Eventually, we reached a stile that allowed access over the wall to the fields of the Dyer farm.’
    • ‘Pine will be used for door frames in information centres, oak for boat repairs at Coniston Boating Centre, signboards, fences and stiles will also be made from the reclaimed timber.’
    • ‘Use gates and stiles to cross fences, hedges and walls.’
    • ‘Carry on along a cut path through long grass and, just before Hole House, take a step stile over the wall, now on your left.’
    • ‘It is an offence for a landowner to obstruct a public right of way, and the placing of a new stile, gate or fence can amount to an obstruction, unless it is a replacement of what previously existed.’
    • ‘As children, Nick and I would sneak out of the house at night and follow the pressure-treated cedar fences into the yards of our neighbors, climbing the stiles, careful not to wake the dogs.’
    • ‘Keep to the right of a small brook and climb steps to reach a stile at the top end of the woodland.’
    • ‘But although they put up stiles across the new fence, walkers and residents feared it would mean access to the well used dam would be restricted.’
    • ‘To always use gates and stiles and to avoid damage to walls and fences.’
    • ‘Swing right from the stile and climb the grass bank before bearing left and crossing further stiles to follow a path through woodland.’
    • ‘The fence includes stiles, a bridle gate and kissing gates which are fully accessible to push-chairs and wheelchair users.’
    • ‘Cross the stile and continue along the grassy track with the fence on the right until a wall step stile is reached.’
    • ‘Once, a cattle trough had been set up right next to the stile we had to climb to reach the only footbridge over a small river.’
    • ‘However, every footpath near my home has fallen trees, drainage problems, walls down, broken fences, gates and stiles.’
    • ‘Its lack of steps and stiles makes it fully accessible to horse riders, mountain bikers and walkers.’
    • ‘The poems have been carved into a series of stones by letter-cutter Pip Hall, each verse interpreted in such a way as to add to the impact of the words, and then incorporated into walls and stiles, or planted like milestones along the route.’
    • ‘The survey, completed in April 2000, highlighted a number of blocked footpaths, inadequate stiles, gates and fences.’
    • ‘Climb a fence stile at the top of the ridge and the summit of Sour Howes lies ahead.’

Origin

Old English stigel, from a Germanic root meaning ‘to climb’.

Pronunciation

stile

/stʌɪl/

Main definitions of stile in English

: stile1stile2

stile2

noun

  • A vertical piece in the frame of a panelled door or sash window.

    Compare with rail (sense 4 of the noun)
    • ‘Drill a clearance hole for a new threaded rivet (same diameter as rivet) through the inner face of the door stile.’
    • ‘Remove the rails (the horizontal pieces of the face frame) and bring the stiles (the vertical pieces) together and mark them both for the dowels.’
    • ‘Usually, joiners cut, carved, and painted all the stiles, rails and panels before putting them together with mortise and tenon joints secured by wooden pins.’
    • ‘Use the same procedure to prevent chipping when cutting across the grain of a solid-wood door's vertical stiles.’
    • ‘Then after panels are done, roll out the stiles, which are the vertical pieces and brush after each, then do the rails, which are the horizontal pieces.’

Origin

Late 17th century: probably from Dutch stijl ‘pillar, doorpost’.

Pronunciation

stile

/stʌɪl/