Definition of statuary marble in English:

statuary marble

noun

  • [mass noun] Fine-grained white marble suitable for making statues.

    • ‘But it would be as reasonable to say that one of those small blue stains which sometimes occur in the purest statuary marble would convert the Eve of Powers to a monster.’
    • ‘The fireplace is being built both in pure white statuary marble and in solid black and green marble.’
    • ‘Workmanship of the very highest caliber showcases rich finishes of Santos mahogany and select statuary marble.’
    • ‘Inset marble panels in contrasting colours can provide a striking contrast to the statuary marble.’
    • ‘The purest form of marble is statuary marble, which is white with visible crystalline structure.’
    • ‘He had looked for this perfect statuary marble for years and eventually he found it in the oldest quarry in Carrara.’
    • ‘A fine copy of a George III Adam chimneypiece in white statuary marble with a moulded breakfront shelf above full ionic columns and carved paterae end blocks.’
    • ‘The British Vice Consul at Spezia, in a report on the Carrara marble industry, says that last year the production of the quarries was 108,951 tons of ordinary and statuary marble, and 52,360 tons of sawn and worked marble.’
    • ‘A round leaded-glass window in the butler's pantry sits above an antique butcher block (from the original kitchen) bearing a slab of the same white statuary marble as the new countertops.’
    • ‘REF AMBS 34 Original Antique Georgian fireplace surround in statuary marble with delicately carved end blocks. £7500 inc V.A.T.’
    • ‘In the case of statuary marble, the heat was sufficient to obliterate the fossils which the limestone formerly contained.’
    • ‘The earlier secretaire was probably stored at the garde-meuble at Versailles until it was sent for use by the King at the chateau of Saint-Cloud, where it was given its present top of white statuary marble.’
    • ‘The distinctive luster of statuary marble is due to the effect caused by light penetrating a short distance into the stone and then being reflected from the surfaces of inner crystals.’