Definition of statistic in English:

statistic

noun

  • 1A fact or piece of data obtained from a study of a large quantity of numerical data.

    ‘the statistics show that the crime rate has increased’
    • ‘In the West we are faced with this fact in alarming health statistics like one in two men and one in three women will get cancer.’
    • ‘Late last week, a raft of economic statistics suggested Greenspan's cries may go unheard.’
    • ‘The statistic can be found in a single web search.’
    • ‘We assessed heterogeneity between studies with the Q statistic and by visual inspection of the results.’
    • ‘Under this approach, the count statistic is viewed as an index to abundance.’
    • ‘Another statistic provides insight into the class divisions that are ripping apart American society.’
    • ‘I saw a statistic recently that suggested that Britons think about holidays every two minutes on average.’
    • ‘It is completely inappropriate to quote an anonymously-sourced statistic when referring to three deaths.’
    • ‘Instead the statistic suggests two things: that Thorpe has played an unusual number of match-changing innings and that he often played in a weak side.’
    • ‘Bradford's ethnic diversity was another area highlighted in the statistics.’
    • ‘It later transpired the statistic had been plucked from another publication: it was a miscalculation.’
    • ‘By simply taking a superficial look at the quantitative statistics we may not be able to see the whole truth.’
    • ‘Plotkin, Dushoff, and Fraser suggest using a statistic, volatility P value, to measure volatility.’
    • ‘In the week before the final the statistics suggested to the Cork management that they should cut one of the training sessions.’
    • ‘The advantage of using Shannon uncertainty is that it allows a complex source of bias to be represented by a single statistic.’
    • ‘A decline in the statistic suggests a n easing because inflation has declined or unemployment has increased.’
    • ‘Another point to make is surrounds the statistics provided on owner occupancy.’
    • ‘Another statistic that's set to rise is the number of children conceived by in vitro fertilisation.’
    • ‘He quoted a government statistic that suggests foreign coverage has gone down on British television by 40% in the last decade.’
    • ‘Behind Professor Godfrey's sensible suggestion lies a statistic that might appeal to any passing cynic.’
    number, integer, quantity, amount, level, total, sum
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 An event or person regarded as no more than a piece of data (used to suggest an inappropriately impersonal approach)
      ‘he was just another statistic’
      • ‘And so they said why not start now so this doesn't happen and you're not another statistic?’
      • ‘Was I just about to become another statistic, one of the many lost souls who go missing, never to be seen again, until their skeleton is found under a patio two decades hence?’
      • ‘He is just another statistic in the Celtic Tiger's briefcase.’
      • ‘The tragedy of Thomas Smith is yet another statistic to underline the need for something to be done to protect young drivers and other road users from the temptation to speed.’
      • ‘He had become another statistic in the law-and-order game that dominated Queensland politics.’
      • ‘Has he no sympathy or regret to convey to the relatives or Scottish public, or are they, as he seems to suggest, just another statistic?’
      • ‘In the ensuing chaos, she herself could have become another grim statistic in the terrible death toll of Sabra and Shatila, had her father not rescued her and her family.’
      • ‘The shooting down of a Lancaster bomber in France in July 1944 was just another grim statistic for Allied commanders.’
      • ‘Chalk Richard Lewis up as another statistic on the list of people who have ruined their lives through illegal drug use.’
      • ‘I know that I'm just another statistic, another self harming teenage girl.’
      • ‘Employees who suddenly find themselves as just another redundancy statistic are simply not prepared to give up.’
      • ‘Had the company stayed, it would almost certainly have become just another forgotten statistic in the vast list of company wind-ups and failures.’
      • ‘Groundwell Farm, he said, must not become ‘yet another statistic in Swindon's neglect’ of historic buildings.’
      • ‘Sadly another young pedestrian has become a statistic in the recent tragic accident on Bradshawgate.’
      • ‘Why end up sick, in hospital, in poor health or even just another statistic when there is every chance that you could remain healthy and have a full life?’
      • ‘Barbara, of Brampton Road, Croydon, is very open about her past giving yet another thought provoking statistic.’
      • ‘However, he has to begin to appreciate that he is actually dealing with a real life here and not just another health statistic.’
      • ‘Paul Brown has become another statistic in the ever increasing male suicide rate in this country.’
      • ‘There is a way, however, to decrease the risk of being swept away in a slide and becoming another statistic.’
      • ‘Be safe and don't be another Christmas accident statistic.’

adjective

Origin

Late 18th century: from German statistisch (adjective), Statistik (noun).

Pronunciation

statistic

/stəˈtɪstɪk/