Definition of statism in English:

statism

noun

  • [mass noun] A political system in which the state has substantial centralized control over social and economic affairs:

    ‘the rise of authoritarian statism’
    • ‘Interventionists have long used the language of markets to advance statism.’
    • ‘It is statism, not the market, and socialism, not capitalism, that has destroyed the African economies.’
    • ‘During its 16 years in power, Chile moved away from economic statism toward a largely free market economy that fostered an increase in domestic and foreign private investment.’
    • ‘As a governing philosophy, it has been able to tack for decades from statism to laissez-faire, from big government to individual freedom, with only occasional discomfort.’
    • ‘In 1940, he emigrated to the United States, where he warned of the rise of quasi-socialist statism in his 1944 book, ‘Bureaucracy.’’
    • ‘Liberalism, welfare statism, mixed economyism, socialism, fascism, communism, national socialism and statist conservatism have all been resounding failures.’
    • ‘Militant anti-communism coupled with an increasing social conservative statism were tendencies many libertarians found distasteful.’
    • ‘All systems that try to promote a mixture of both free enterprise and state intervention inevitably evolve into some form of authoritarian statism.’
    • ‘Such imposition of ‘nationalist’ corporate statism has most commonly been identified with variations of fascism.’
    • ‘A real opposition to statism in both its welfarist and militarist guises is resurgent and it finds itself in a target-rich environment full of follies to lampoon, lambaste, and expose.’
    • ‘Europe has always been susceptible to the siren's call of socialism and as Tyler Cowen points out, there is a direct link between statism and the persecution of minorities.’
    • ‘The split will be between the two philosophies of big government statism and small government constitutionalism.’
    • ‘Nowhere was it tried - and I mean real socialism, not welfare statism - where tyranny, misery, poverty, fear and oppression failed to follow.’
    • ‘Challenging the assumptions of the historical school of thought, Hayek insisted that socialism and statism were products not of economic forces beyond anyone's control but of erroneous and destructive ideas.’
    • ‘What we oppose is statism, whether it's called Bolshevism, National Socialism, Fascism, Fabianism, or New Dealism.’
    • ‘Europe is driven by an economic and social doctrine of statism that is fundamentally at odds with the liberal capitalism practised in the Anglo-Saxon world.’
    • ‘Gillingham's libretto revolves around the conflict between the champions of economic statism and proponents of economic liberalism.’
    • ‘Likewise one of the things I hate about socialism and statism is that it erodes incentives to respectability.’
    • ‘This comes as no surprise to realists who understand that words are weapons and that internationalist ideas are the continuation of statism by other means.’
    • ‘Their original leaders were orthodox Marxists who preached international revolution, not domestic statism.’

Pronunciation:

statism

/ˈsteɪtɪz(ə)m/