Definition of stationer in English:

stationer

noun

  • A person or shop selling paper, pens, and other writing and office materials.

    ‘cards can either be bought from a stationer or made out of ordinary file paper’
    ‘I bought a book of transparent folders from the stationer's’
    • ‘We will provide stationers with a catalogue of the entire range and customers can place orders and get them delivered fast.’
    • ‘You bought meat at the butchers, stationery at the stationers.’
    • ‘Receivers moved in on Monday to wind up the debt-hit booksellers and stationers, and the company was placed into liquidation.’
    • ‘Encore is the grand dame of wedding invitations so entrust your wedding invitations with a reputable stationer with over ten years in the wedding stationery business.’
    • ‘Wedding invitations can be obtained by mail order, shopping online for printers stationers is easy and stress free.’
    • ‘It was that having agreed that a calendar would be useful the means of getting one that felt natural to her was not to pop into a stationers and pay a quid but to shift the onus onto her social worker.’
    • ‘Another good idea is to get some labels, either buy some from a charity or just plain white ones from the stationers would do, and recycle those prepaid envelopes which come with your junk mail.’
    • ‘A posh stationers in London's Covent Garden has unveiled an ‘interactive shop window’ which lets window shoppers see what's on offer before going into the store.’
    • ‘Finally, the Act of 1534 repealed the Act of 1484, and further stated that aliens could only sell wholesale wares to English-born printers or stationers, and that no bound books were to be imported at all.’
    • ‘Roger and I went to Gibert Jeune the stationer, near Place Saint-Michel, where we bought blue-cover student notebooks lined with graph paper.’
    • ‘A stationer can print more than just wedding invitations.’
    • ‘Second, the statute attempted to break the monopoly of the stationers by limiting the term of copyright - a radical change for the stationers, who until then had enjoyed perpetual copyright.’
    • ‘They retail from about £30 from most stationers and are also available over the web.’
    • ‘You can draw up your own will - you can even download forms from the internet, or buy a form from a stationers.’
    • ‘Garvey writes about some of the albums available from stationers and elsewhere, in which users could essentially ‘file’ their clippings and other material.’
    • ‘When he was interviewed by GQ magazine, he heaped praise on the ‘many extremely fine products’ made by Smythson, an upmarket stationer and leather goods company with a shop in Bond Street, London.’
    • ‘As he tramped the cobbled streets of early nineteenth-century London, clad in his elder brother's shabby overcoat, he decided to get work as a stationer and bookbinder.’
    • ‘Fortunately, it is still possible to visit a stationers and purchase a foot ruler subdivided into inches, whilst a builder's merchants will happily supply a yard-rule, marked up in feet and inches.’
    • ‘They don't call them booksellers, they call them stationers.’
    • ‘Three days early, even after having had the ring-binding prised open by the lovely people at Ryman's stationers to change the bibliography for something… more consistent.’

Origin

Middle English (in the sense ‘bookseller’): from medieval Latin stationarius ‘tradesman (at a fixed location, i.e. not itinerant)’. Compare with stationary.

Pronunciation

stationer

/ˈsteɪʃ(ə)nə/