Definition of state school in English:

state school


  • A school that is funded and controlled by the state and for which no fees are charged.

    • ‘But it is based on the cheque book: if you can afford to send your child to a private school, to pay for extra lessons, or to move into the catchment area of a decent state school, then you are fine.’
    • ‘He's still glowing from the spat he had on radio last week with the minister about who can and can't teach in a state school.’
    • ‘Burnham GS, a mixed state school, was encouraged by Bucks County Council to apply for funding.’
    • ‘In the present ecumenical atmosphere it might even be possible for a reformed church school and a Catholic school to be accommodated within the same state school.’
    • ‘A bright boy with an inquisitive mind, Pycroft went to a state school and became a member of the National Academy for Gifted and Talented Youth, a government body that nurtures exceptional children.’
    • ‘The quest for normality includes sending Gina-Maria to the local state school.’
    • ‘The top state school was Colchester Royal Grammar School on 512.3 points per student.’
    • ‘The most eye-catching proposal, first outlined last year, is to allow parents to send their children free to a private school provided the fees are no more than a state school.’
    • ‘In a nation where rowing is dominated by private school programmes, Tanner began teaching and coaching at state school, Ealing Grammar.’
    • ‘Every time government subsidises a private school at the expense of a state school it helps the private sector to build its balance sheet.’
    • ‘After losing a gruelling three-year battle with Cumbria County Council to save Lowick as a state school, it began life as an independent with a rousing opening parade on Wednesday.’
    • ‘The government in this country is crying out for English teacher's, and I've got an English degree, but I can't teach in a state school because I can't do long multiplication.’
    • ‘Such a sum could have been more fairly spent improving a state school or employing more teachers.’
    • ‘It was a medium sized village with a public school and a state school.’
    • ‘It is an expensive quandary involving private schools or moving house to be in the catchment area of a decent state school, and often it also means paying for extra tuition.’
    • ‘It is surely of little importance whether a college's students are drawn from a public school or a state school.’
    • ‘Avonmore primary, a state school in the London borough of Hammersmith and Fulham, came 19th, with an aggregate score of 266.’
    • ‘Some years ago, my eldest son, from a state school but via a sixth form college, applied to Oxford, among other universities, to read law.’
    • ‘No state school in the UK today - primary or secondary - can be relied upon to promote Christian beliefs or values.’
    • ‘I'd rather beg than send children to state school, Letwin says’


state school