Definition of stage direction in English:

stage direction

noun

  • An instruction in the text of a play indicating the movement, position, or tone of an actor, or the sound effects and lighting.

    • ‘An extra touch of verisimilitude in this production is provided by the stage direction of Mr Adamo, who certainly knows not only what he wants, but how to get it.’
    • ‘Stoppard doesn't go far in terms of stage direction; that's up to the directors of individual performances to figure out for themselves.’
    • ‘‘I started out wanting to be an actor, but after the third or fourth play, I realised I was better at set designing and lighting, so I took up stage direction,’ he said.’
    • ‘As a result he missed the stage direction that meant his hair would have to be dyed and it was a complete surprise to him when the director mentioned it.’
    • ‘Redgrave suggests Pinter's method is ‘entirely Shakespearean, in the sense that there is no stage direction.’’
    • ‘The sound is vivid and the stage direction (under Graham Vick) is imaginative and fully convincing.’
    • ‘Strindberg's stage directions instruct the mother to listen agitatedly to the Fantaisie-Impromptu, matching the agitato marking of the music.’
    • ‘Graham Vick's stage direction assaults the eyes with bolts of color and outrageous contraptions, like Falstaff's wine-stained dining table, which more closely resembles a playground device.’
    • ‘The stage direction by Abdou Gomari is slick and the myriad of technical equipment for the aerial and stunt acts look totally safe and secure.’
    • ‘In her stage direction, she has the set supposedly balanced on a promontory of earth so that you really see the mud.’
    • ‘Yet since the turn of the last century, Russian ballet has emphasized the dancer over the dance, with little more importance placed on choreography than the art of opera places on stage direction.’
    • ‘As You Like It begins with a stage direction from the First Folio (there were no prior printings) that says simply, Enter Orlando and Adam.’
    • ‘The most common stage directions in Shakespeare's texts, entrances and exits are usually printed in italic, set apart from the text of the dialogue, and couched in Latin terms such as exit, exeunt, manet, manent, solus, and omnes.’
    • ‘Sanjay Talwar's stage direction captures the distance that has grown between these characters by never letting them get within 10 feet of each other.’
    • ‘I probably could talk my way out of doing the rehearsal, but then I'd have missed a whole pile of stage direction and would have to wing it with only the dress rehearsal to go before the show.’
    • ‘If the director gives a stage direction that the star disdains, he will usually simply not do it, or he'll leave the set and sulk.’
    • ‘The stage direction by Frédéric Fisbach was clean and always inventive, never calling attention to itself, which is a triumph in a work that has a large cast and little apparent dramatic action.’
    • ‘Other times, we flounder in our folly, unable to remember the simplest stage direction, let alone the words to save our skin.’
    • ‘Here the final act of the play is set in church for the funeral of the two lovers and the stage directions give instruction for the solemnity of the scene calling for doleful music and processions of crying mourners.’
    • ‘Domingo's fussy stage direction and Michael Scott's sketchy sets update the action to the year of the opera's composition - a pointless gloss, since all sense of time and place is more or less eradicated by Act Two.’

Pronunciation:

stage direction

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