Definition of squatter in English:

squatter

noun

  • 1A person who unlawfully occupies an uninhabited building or unused land:

    ‘the police moved in and evicted the squatters’
    [as modifier] ‘a squatter camp’
    • ‘The plan aims to clear squatters from government-owned land to make way for infrastructure and commercial development.’
    • ‘It has been one month since squatters occupied the old Woodwards building in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside.’
    • ‘Police have previously been accused of standing by or supporting the land invasions and ignoring court orders to evict the squatters.’
    • ‘Disused and neglected, the hall was invaded by squatters who occupied the building until it was gutted by a fire in 2002, which killed five people.’
    • ‘There are many such other cases, including Kitwe, where squatters have occupied land illegally at the former council farm and are resisting moving despite a court ruling that they vacate the land.’
    • ‘After being empty for years, the boarded-up building is now home to a trio of squatters, who have dubbed themselves ‘land pirates’.’
    • ‘Many Roma in Western Europe are squatters, occupying condemned buildings while trying to find more suitable accommodations.’
    • ‘A Judge today ordered squatters occupying a dilapidated York hotel to leave the building immediately and pay £2,000 in legal costs.’
    • ‘Last year, the building was occupied by a group of squatters, who claimed they were protesting against buildings being left empty in York.’
    • ‘The court rules that the squatters were illegally occupying the land.’
    • ‘To evict squatters, property owners must take out a summons for possession in the County Court or High Court or produce a written statement or certificate under the Criminal Law Act 1977.’
    • ‘But so far only around 200 farms have been taken over and the government has evicted squatters who took over land themselves after the launch of its resettlement scheme in July.’
    • ‘Such juries would be unlikely to evict squatters from land owned by a wealthy entity that left the land untouched, i.e., treated as an investment.’
    • ‘The minister said the man acted contrary to the law and advised all land owners to follow laid down procedure when evicting squatters.’
    • ‘On September 16, the courts issued an injunction asking squatters to leave the building.’
    • ‘Three days later, another fire killed seven in a building used by squatters.’
    • ‘He added that weak law enforcement had resulted in the occupation of riverbanks and other forbidden areas in the city by illegal squatters, and the unlawful development of buildings by developers.’
    • ‘Although Duvenage has been through all the legal channels he has been unable to either sell his land to government or evict the squatters.’
    • ‘The Johannesburg council, however, plans to evict the squatters so that the building can be revamped as part of its inner city regeneration programme.’
    • ‘The city council continued its crusade against bad buildings, evicting illegal squatters from several bad buildings.’
    1. 1.1North American, Australian, NZ historical A settler with no legal title to the land occupied, typically one on land not yet allocated by a government.
      • ‘Finding themselves dispossessed of everything they owned, they became squatters in their former land.’
      • ‘Every year the men used to ride out along the boundaries of the land owned by the towns just to make sure that they were intact; that none of it had been settled on by squatters or enclosed by the local lairds.’
      • ‘The squatters settled in the flat part of the ravine, on top of the cemetery, but did not build a good city in terms of urban development.’
      • ‘He recognised the value of making concessions to the colonists where possible, and it was opportune that his term of office coincided with a relaxation of policy from London and the recognition of land claims by squatters.’
      • ‘These millions of folks, in effect squatters illegally occupying untitled land, cannot ever use their houses for collateral for loans or have any recourse to generate wealth.’
      settler, colonizer, colonial, frontiersman, frontierswoman, pioneer
      View synonyms
  • 2Australian NZ A large-scale sheep or cattle farmer:

    [as modifier] ‘one of the wealthiest and most prominent squatter families of northern Victoria’
    • ‘They moved into runs in the drier back country rather than deal with established squatters and selectors.’
    • ‘It revolves around re-creation of a 19th century grazing property, owned by a squatter and his wife, and all of the people who work on their selection.’
    • ‘After sometimes months on the road, carefully herding the squatter's stock, the drover would ask for his cheque.’
    • ‘Even the squatter has a great deal of trouble to get hold of a good man as a shepherd or knockabout hand.’
    • ‘The demand for self-government in New South Wales in the 1840s came from the rich squatters who objected to Governor Gipps attempting to make them pay more for their land.’
    1. 2.1historical A person occupying a tract of pastoral land as a tenant of the Crown.
      • ‘With little effective recourse, the Government reluctantly accepted the presence of the squatters and handed over Crown land for nominal lease and licence fees.’
      • ‘Can't we replace the vanquished with the courageous, the Chamberlains with the Churchills, the failed squatter with the successful farmer?’
      • ‘From the 1850s it referred to small farmers settling on Crown lands occupied by squatters.’
      • ‘Early pastoralists, or squatters as they were often called, lived a hard and pioneering life, often in isolation with few if any comforts.’
      • ‘The previous Victorian act, the Land Tax Act 1877, was directed to lands owned by squatters, what were known as landed estates.’

Pronunciation

squatter

/ˈskwɒtə/